International Skeptics Forum

International Skeptics Forum (http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/forumindex.php)
-   Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology (http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   NK cell donation ? (http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=338442)

casebro 25th August 2019 09:54 AM

NK cell donation ?
 
Natural Killer cell donation for the sake of a cancer patient relative. Anybody here know the procedure? Looks like they start with a plasma extraction, but do they put the remains of the plasma back in?

And would diabetes, kidneys, BP(meds) preclude a donor?

McHrozni 26th August 2019 03:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by casebro (Post 12798282)
Natural Killer cell donation for the sake of a cancer patient relative. Anybody here know the procedure? Looks like they start with a plasma extraction, but do they put the remains of the plasma back in?

Yes. Donating blood cells (and plasma) is a common medical procedure, the blood is drawn in a continuous system, the cells separated from plasma, the relevant cell layer is removed and the rest of the blood put back into patient.

It all sounds scary, but it is not. You would be donating a buffy coat:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ion-scheme.png

The blood is commonly processed after donation, you almost never recieve a donation of full blood. It is usually erithrocytes plus saline, we use plasma for other patients who need fresh frozen plasma, such as hemophiliacs. The reason why your blood would be put back in you is because there are very few leukocytes in blood as compared to other fractions and only a few percent of them would be NK cells.

This is done through apheresis:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile...FPP-plasma.png

Quote:

And would diabetes, kidneys, BP(meds) preclude a donor?
Probably not, but ask your doctor all the same.

McHrozni

casebro 26th August 2019 06:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by McHrozni (Post 12798884)
Yes. Donating blood cells (and plasma) is a common medical procedure, the blood is drawn in a continuous system, the cells separated from plasma, the relevant cell layer is removed and the rest of the blood put back into patient.

It all sounds scary, but it is not. You would be donating a buffy coat:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ion-scheme.png

The blood is commonly processed after donation, you almost never recieve a donation of full blood. It is usually erithrocytes plus saline, we use plasma for other patients who need fresh frozen plasma, such as hemophiliacs. The reason why your blood would be put back in you is because there are very few leukocytes in blood as compared to other fractions and only a few percent of them would be NK cells.

This is done through apheresis:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile...FPP-plasma.png



Probably not, but ask your doctor all the same.

McHrozni

Ah, the whole family has given blood. Dad was a WWII Vet, knew the value and ease.

The question was "do they keep the plasma out to separate the NKs later, or do they separate the plasma and put it back in while the donor is on the table?" Sounds like the separation step is probably too complex to do at the phlebotomist's.

But found out that my sibs have already asked the oncologist about me, he says I'm not a good choice due to my health issues. Bro has 4 other first degree relatives. Two are local, two would fly in if needed. Not likely they would need me, but I already emailed my Doc. But Bro is getting down to life-or-death, it's a no-brainer that I would step up.

Apparently even random NKs will help, but the closer the match the better. First step is a gene test for all the potential donors.

I'm not sure if they are concerned about a lowered plasma level causing me grief, or that i may get anxious on the table and cause THEM grief. But I'm pretty stoical, even had a knee replaced without sedation. Local and spinal yes, but I was awake and could FEEL the bone saws and hammers in my ears, more than hear them.

eta: Apparently the DNA study is to check the HLA-DRB1 gene in particular. That is after a rough match of histocomaotaibility HLA-a,b,&c. The HLA-DRB1 match is to avoid Sarcoidosis. Genes is tuff.

Giordano 26th August 2019 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by casebro (Post 12798986)
Ah, the whole family has given blood. Dad was a WWII Vet, knew the value and ease.

The question was "do they keep the plasma out to separate the NKs later, or do they separate the plasma and put it back in while the donor is on the table?" Sounds like the separation step is probably too complex to do at the phlebotomist's.

But found out that my sibs have already asked the oncologist about me, he says I'm not a good choice due to my health issues. Bro has 4 other first degree relatives. Two are local, two would fly in if needed. Not likely they would need me, but I already emailed my Doc. But Bro is getting down to life-or-death, it's a no-brainer that I would step up.

Apparently even random NKs will help, but the closer the match the better. First step is a gene test for all the potential donors.

I'm not sure if they are concerned about a lowered plasma level causing me grief, or that i may get anxious on the table and cause THEM grief. But I'm pretty stoical, even had a knee replaced without sedation. Local and spinal yes, but I was awake and could FEEL the bone saws and hammers in my ears, more than hear them.

eta: Apparently the DNA study is to check the HLA-DRB1 gene in particular. That is after a rough match of histocomaotaibility HLA-a,b,&c. The HLA-DRB1 match is to avoid Sarcoidosis. Genes is tuff.

Although the machine itself is a bit complex, the donor's role is very simple and pretty much pain free. They put iv's in the donor, the needle pricks being the only things that might conceivably be considered painful. Then they collect the cells and return the plasma to the donor simultaneously as they sit in a chair for 6 to 8 hours. The donor doesn't feel anything except boredom. They never lack for plasma.

I am vey sorry to hear of your brother's situation; I wish him the best!

bruto 26th August 2019 06:57 AM

For some time I gave plasma on a regular basis as part of a program for a patient with hemophilia. A patient would have several matched donors, so each would give plasma once a month, and the patient would get plasma once a week. That was a while ago, and it may have changed some, but it was a pretty simple procedure from the donor's point of view. They extract the blood, take the needed plasma, and put the rest back. It's the same with platelets except they take the platelets and give the rest back. The machine used a centrifuge to separate components. I imagine that if the cells required can be readily separated in the machine, they'll send the plasma right back, but otherwise they'll keep the plasma. If you're healthy you have enough. When I went, they had video so I'd get to see a movie, and they'd serve coffee and cookies afterward. They'd throw a little party when one did it 50 times, but alas, I think my patient died or something, and they stopped calling at 49!

catsmate 26th August 2019 07:10 AM

Most of the important stuff has been said; it's a pretty pain-free process. I've donated whole blood, plasma and bone marrow (the old way). Blood and plasma is simple.
Unfortunately there is no longer restorative Guinness provided...


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
2015-19, TribeTech AB. All Rights Reserved.