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-   -   India’s moon lander lost? (http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=338712)

EHocking 6th September 2019 04:22 PM

India’s moon lander lost?
 
Indications are that India’s attempt to land a craft on the moon has failed.

India lost contact with its Vikram lunar lander Friday (Sept. 6) during a daring attempt to make history as the first country to land near the south pole. The landing anomaly may have dashed Indian dreams of becoming just the fourth country to successfully soft-land a spacecraft on the moon.

Skeptic Ginger 6th September 2019 04:54 PM

I know, what a bummer. And it had a rover too. :(

I wonder if it's possible everything is OK except a temporary communication glitch.

Can you imagine how depressing that control room must have been. They had almost landed.

novaphile 6th September 2019 05:26 PM

Lost is perhaps a little strong.

I'm fairly sure they know where it is.

:D

EHocking 6th September 2019 05:29 PM

Lost as in the same way the Titanic was lost.

(Ironically, this voyage was probably looking for ice)

William Parcher 6th September 2019 05:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger (Post 12811331)
Can you imagine how depressing that control room must have been.

It's not like walking out of the control room and finding that there is no Indian food in India. That would be really depressing.

rjh01 6th September 2019 06:20 PM

To land on the moon is very hard for a country or organisation that has never done it before. For example the first attempt by the Russians to crash land on the moon failed when they MISSED the moon entirely.

Trebuchet 6th September 2019 06:30 PM

Were there tardigrades on it? Asking for a friend.

Seriously, it took the USA quite a while to get the whole moon thing down as well. And then there's Mars, where the overall score is about 50%. Space is hard.

cjameshuff 7th September 2019 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjh01 (Post 12811404)
To land on the moon is very hard for a country or organisation that has never done it before. For example the first attempt by the Russians to crash land on the moon failed when they MISSED the moon entirely.

The first US attempt (at a flyby, ignoring the numerous launch failures) also effectively missed...it flew past the moon, but at too much of a distance for its instruments to detect the moon and activate.

pgwenthold 9th September 2019 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjh01 (Post 12811404)
To land on the moon is very hard for a country or organisation that has never done it before. For example the first attempt by the Russians to crash land on the moon failed when they MISSED the moon entirely.

Didn't Russia try to soft land on the moon on like, the day Armstrong and Aldrin landed? Or maybe a day or two later? The whole goal was to steal thunder from their return to earth. The attempt failed and the thing came in way too fast.

rjh01 9th September 2019 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pgwenthold (Post 12814286)
Didn't Russia try to soft land on the moon on like, the day Armstrong and Aldrin landed? Or maybe a day or two later? The whole goal was to steal thunder from their return to earth. The attempt failed and the thing came in way too fast.

You are probably talking about Luna 15WP

Quote:

On July 21, 1969, while Apollo 11 astronauts finished the first human moonwalk, Luna 15, an unmanned Soviet spacecraft in lunar orbit at the time, began its descent to the lunar surface. Launched three days before the Apollo 11 mission, it was the second Soviet attempt to return lunar soil back to Earth with a goal to outstrip the US in achieving a sample return in the Moon race. The previous mission, designated E-8-5-402, launched June 14, 1969, did not achieve Earth orbit because the third stage of its launch vehicle failed to ignite. The Luna 15 lander crashed into the Moon at 15:50 UT, hours before the scheduled American lift off from the Moon.[2]
Ref 2 is this https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/sci...Americans.html

Elagabalus 10th September 2019 01:31 PM

They still have the orbiter with its seven year mission to fall back on.

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