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-   -   Which businesses/sectors are profiting from Covis-19? (http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=343042)

lionking 31st March 2020 03:37 AM

Which businesses/sectors are profiting from Covis-19?
 
This thread was prompted by a conversation with a daughter about her job. She said income has increased and her job is rock solid. She works for a company involved in regulating the energy sector (with a great emphasis on safety) and is classified as an emergency service.

Okay, with dominoes falling over everywhere, which sectors are doing well (my observations are from an Australian perspective of course)?

Supermarkets? Probably, but I知 not certain.

Pharmacies? Without doubt.

Streaming Services? Again, without doubt.

Food and other delivery services? Pretty good bet.

Unilever? The world痴 biggest producer of hand sanitiser is no doubt rubbing their hands (sorry).

Computer gaming? Pretty certain.

Robotics? Over the longer term, but I doubt now.

This is all off the top of my head (as is almost everything I post), but what do you think? Which businesses would be doing well at the moment?

Norman Alexander 31st March 2020 03:41 AM

Sex toys manufacturers.

SuburbanTurkey 31st March 2020 04:37 AM

Liquor store seems to making steady business, same with recreational pot.

The Great Zaganza 31st March 2020 05:20 AM

gun shops

SuburbanTurkey 31st March 2020 05:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Great Zaganza (Post 13039287)
gun shops

I eagerly await the glut of used guns for sale after the crisis.

Gun people are the closest realization of the lemmings trope. I still want to figure out who they think they are going to shoot during this pandemic to justify panic buying all the guns and ammo.

It's pretty annoying, because I'd like to be able to buy ammo for summer shooting matches once this is all over, but the stock will be low as these morons gobble up every bit of ammo for reasons no one can clearly articulate.

JoeMorgue 31st March 2020 05:27 AM

From the US Chamber of Commerce:

- Cleaning Services
- Delivery Services
- Drive In Movie Theaters
- Grocery Stores
- Liquor and Wine Stores
- Meal Prep Delivery Services
- Canned and Jarred Goods Companies
- Game Makers and Sellers
- Fitness Equipment Companies
- Landscaping and Yard Care Companies


https://www.uschamber.com/co/start/s...ful-businesses

lionking 31st March 2020 05:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Great Zaganza (Post 13039287)
gun shops

We don稚 have a gun culture to speak of in Australia, but there are now extra gun restrictions which mean some shops will close down.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-...sland/12101850

JoeMorgue 31st March 2020 05:31 AM

It's a harder metric to judge but I can't imagine the news media is exactly hurting right now.

lionking 31st March 2020 05:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoeMorgue (Post 13039291)
From the US Chamber of Commerce:

- Cleaning Services
- Delivery Services
- Drive In Movie Theaters
- Grocery Stores
- Liquor and Wine Stores
- Meal Prep Delivery Services
- Canned and Jarred Goods Companies
- Game Makers and Sellers
- Fitness Equipment Companies
- Landscaping and Yard Care Companies


https://www.uschamber.com/co/start/s...ful-businesses

I知 amazed they still exist in the US. They are almost extinct here.

JoeMorgue 31st March 2020 05:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13039300)
I知 amazed they still exist in the US. They are almost extinct here.

There's not that many for sure, only about 300 total across the country.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/29/soci...ers-close.html

lionking 31st March 2020 05:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoeMorgue (Post 13039298)
It's a harder metric to judge but I can't imagine the news media is exactly hurting right now.

They are here. With so much emphasis on sport in Australia, and no sport, I know news media here is hurting badly.

Earthborn 31st March 2020 05:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13039221)
Supermarkets? Probably, but I知 not certain.

I doubt it. They have to pay for extra safety measures such as sneeze guards and extra cleaning while at the same time people start bulk buying all the things they normally sell at a loss.

Quote:

Streaming Services? Again, without doubt.
Not unless they are suddenly getting a lot more subscribers. People watching doesn't earn them money, it costs them money. Streaming services have to pay for their bandwidth too. Their business model relies on a steady stream of subscription fees while people don't have the time to watch a whole lot.

Sideroxylon 31st March 2020 05:54 AM

US senators.

TragicMonkey 31st March 2020 06:15 AM

Perhaps not until after it's over, but a lot of companies will be enhancing their communication technology to allow remote working. Hardware and software, everything from laptop docking stations to conference call apps. It might spark a revolution in commercial real estate as companies learn they can function just as well by having some/much/all of their workers working from home, rather than renting expensive office space.

eta: A large scale pivot to work-from-home will have heavy ripple effects on the economy. Gas usage will go down, for starters. Furniture sales will spike when people buy proper desks and chairs for home. The IRS will have a new headache over rules for determining what constitutes a home office. A lot of restaurants and catering that currently serve mostly office workers will plummet, especially those food trucks that haunt office parks. Jesus, even clothing sales will change: who'd buy khaki pants if they don't have to?

I think the shutdown itself is just the start of significant changes and we'll be seeing the aftereffects for years to come.

eta: the more I think about it, the more change I'm seeing. Hell, I don't even wear deodorant if I'm not leaving the house that day!

psionl0 31st March 2020 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13039221)
This thread was prompted by a conversation with a daughter about her job. She said income has increased and her job is rock solid. She works for a company involved in regulating the energy sector (with a great emphasis on safety) and is classified as an emergency service.

Okay, with dominoes falling over everywhere, which sectors are doing well (my observations are from an Australian perspective of course)?

Supermarkets? Probably, but I知 not certain.

Pharmacies? Without doubt.

Streaming Services? Again, without doubt.

Food and other delivery services? Pretty good bet.

Unilever? The world痴 biggest producer of hand sanitiser is no doubt rubbing their hands (sorry).

Computer gaming? Pretty certain.

Robotics? Over the longer term, but I doubt now.

This is all off the top of my head (as is almost everything I post), but what do you think? Which businesses would be doing well at the moment?

You forgot Centerlink.

dann 31st March 2020 09:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13039302)
They are here. With so much emphasis on sport in Australia, and no sport, I know news media here is hurting badly.


The media will be losing a lot of advertisers. I don't know which booming sectors might increase their advertising in the new market.

Ernie M 31st March 2020 11:30 AM

The legal profession will profit
 
I expect the legal community and those connected to them, to profit immensely from issues connected to SARS-CoV-2 and Covid-19.

I believe there could potentially be a rise of
  • Attorneys will abuse their authority and commit ethics violations
  • Power of Attorney abuse; could be a family member(s), attorney, or someone else.
  • Trustee abuse
  • Guardianship abuse

lionking 31st March 2020 12:33 PM

Construction is still going very strong, but we only need to see a string of infections at building sites to see the whole industry closing down.

welshdean 31st March 2020 01:05 PM

Supermarkets?

Here (UK), they're only allowing 20-50 shoppers in at a time, trolley sizes appear back to normal with the 'max per customer' restrictions. I'd say that they did benefit, but now their income is significantly more sporadic than normal.

Superstores here are 20% of normal shopping traffic. A data point of 1, so take from it what you will.

Leftus 31st March 2020 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TragicMonkey (Post 13039324)
The IRS will have a new headache over rules for determining what constitutes a home office.

The standing rules will work just fine. What will likely happen is more people will opt for the simplified home office option in which you don't have to calculate actual expenses and whatnot.

It will be interesting to see if there is any clarification to the employee rules, as compared to the small biz rules. Specifically the "convenience test" Given the limited resources in exam, I'm guessing that most people could slide one by without triggering pain, if that was the only issue.

welshdean 31st March 2020 01:15 PM

As I mentioned in a different thread, US hospitals will [ahem] make a killing, the health insurance industry, mmm not so much.

rjh01 1st April 2020 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoeMorgue (Post 13039291)
From the US Chamber of Commerce:

- Cleaning Services
- Delivery Services
- Drive In Movie Theaters
- Grocery Stores
- Liquor and Wine Stores
- Meal Prep Delivery Services
- Canned and Jarred Goods Companies
- Game Makers and Sellers
- Fitness Equipment Companies
- Landscaping and Yard Care Companies


https://www.uschamber.com/co/start/s...ful-businesses

Can I add in people who make freezers? When people started panic buying they needed somewhere to store fresh meat and so a freezer is required. Now they are out of stock. These would have been bought by people who would otherwise never have bought a freezer.

The Atheist 1st April 2020 01:37 AM

Security companies are doing huge business in shut-down areas.

Massive increase in static guards and almost as big an increase in mobile work.

alfaniner 1st April 2020 02:31 AM

Condom manufacturers.

And in nine months or so... baby items.

JoeMorgue 1st April 2020 09:36 AM

'Something Needs to Fill That Void.' As Stadiums Go Quiet, Esports Are Having a Moment

Quote:

Unless you’re into marble racing or Belarusian hockey, you’re probably having a hard time finding any sports to watch right now. The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the NBA and NHL seasons into limbo, MLB’s opening day came and went with nary a knuckleball or bat flip, and the Olympics are being put off until 2021.

But one form of sporting event lives on in the age of social distancing: Esports, or competitive video gaming, is on the rise, with people tuning in to everything from Counter-Strike to League of Legends. Viewership on Twitch, the go-to site for game streamers, is up 31% in March, by one estimate. People stuck inside are playing more video games, no doubt. But they’re also watching the world’s best gamers take one another on, too.
https://time.com/5812633/esports-coronavirus/

theprestige 1st April 2020 09:44 AM

wrong thread

Gord_in_Toronto 1st April 2020 10:10 AM

Here in Ontario (Canada) pot shops have been declared an essential service.

Together with liquor stores. The government did explain its justification for these decisions. Obviously some investment opportunities here. :thumbsup:

welshdean 1st April 2020 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alfaniner (Post 13040562)
Condom manufacturers.

And in nine months or so... baby items.

And if this lockdown continues... divorce lawyers.

welshdean 1st April 2020 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13039302)
They are here. With so much emphasis on sport in Australia, and no sport, I know news media here is hurting badly.


Really?
Which sports?
Certainly not Cricket or Rugby surely.

:D:D:thumbsup:

William Parcher 1st April 2020 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alfaniner (Post 13040562)
Condom manufacturers.

Hello...


Global condom shortage looms as coronavirus shuts down production

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Guardian
A global shortage of condoms is looming, the world’s biggest producer has said, after a coronavirus lockdown forced it to shut down production.

Malaysia’s Karex Bhd makes one in every five condoms globally. It has not produced a single condom in its three Malaysian factories for more than a week because of a lockdown imposed by the government to halt the spread of the virus.

That is already a shortfall of 100 million condoms, normally marketed internationally by brands such as Durex, supplied to state healthcare systems such as Britain’s NHS or distributed by aid programmes such as the UN Population Fund...

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...own-production

Sherkeu 2nd April 2020 01:15 AM

Air Freight is doing well. DHL, FedEx, UPS are in high demand. As are the Cargo fleets that just do cargo. Though anything that is approved for int'l flight with space for cargo is in the air now, including many passenger planes, though for them it doesnt offset losses.

Telemedicine - a lot of people will be introduced to it by this and find it convenient...plus no sick strangers in waiting rooms. So many things dont really require a visit.

Kraft-Heinz Foods - They seems to make all the easy foods kids like. Kids are home now so there will be an uptick in Capri Sun, Mac n Cheese, cheese slices, Jello, Ketchup, etc...

blutoski 2nd April 2020 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto (Post 13041016)
Here in Ontario (Canada) pot shops have been declared an essential service.

Together with liquor stores. The government did explain its justification for these decisions. Obviously some investment opportunities here. :thumbsup:

The reality is that unfortunately it's precisely their clientele that has been hit hardest financially.

If they weren't buying unlicensed product before, they sure are now.

William Parcher 2nd April 2020 02:35 PM

I read that many or most of the legal marijuana dispensaries in America have stopped selling to recreational use buyers and are strictly selling to medical use buyers.

That will greatly reduce their profits.

blutoski 2nd April 2020 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Parcher (Post 13042771)
I read that many or most of the legal marijuana dispensaries in America have stopped selling to recreational use buyers and are strictly selling to medical use buyers.

That will greatly reduce their profits.

Based on the performance of the industry so far, I'd have to ask: "what profits?"

William Parcher 2nd April 2020 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blutoski (Post 13042841)
Based on the performance of the industry so far, I'd have to ask: "what profits?"

Oh, I just assumed that dispensaries are profitable. I thought that they are very popular.

Twiggett 2nd April 2020 04:31 PM

I am a technician for a company that repairs/refurbishes various medical equipment (not ventilators) and we are running ourselves ragged trying to even remotely keep up with the demand from hospitals trying to expand their capabilities. I've been with the company for 11 years and for the month of March we beat our previous record revenue month by roughly 30% without raising prices at all. I can't speak to the industry as a whole but I suspect it's pretty much the same with any company that is involved with medical devices.

Sherkeu 2nd April 2020 11:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Twiggett (Post 13042933)
I am a technician for a company that repairs/refurbishes various medical equipment (not ventilators) and we are running ourselves ragged trying to even remotely keep up with the demand from hospitals trying to expand their capabilities. I've been with the company for 11 years and for the month of March we beat our previous record revenue month by roughly 30% without raising prices at all. I can't speak to the industry as a whole but I suspect it's pretty much the same with any company that is involved with medical devices.

Is there some gov't guarantee that anyone expanding capacity will be reimbursed if not used? Or is this a company decision based on their own view of projected needs?

I'm certainly not against either, just wondering how companies are handling expenses like that.

lionking 2nd April 2020 11:37 PM

I was talking to a plumber today who has 8 apprentices. His business is doing well. One of the Australian government stimulus initiatives is to pay employers of apprentices half their salary until the end of September. He will get over $160k for doing what he would likely have done anyway - keep his apprentices in a job.

Yes, I know this is an exception to all those businesses crashing.

William Parcher 3rd April 2020 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lionking (Post 13043218)
pay employers of apprentices half their salary until the end of September.

There could be big problems for many employers if your government does not pay them 100% of their salary until further notice. This could extend beyond September.

lionking 4th April 2020 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Parcher (Post 13043414)
There could be big problems for many employers if your government does not pay them 100% of their salary until further notice. This could extend beyond September.

There is another program for businesses where turnover is down 30% where government will pay $750 per week regardless of what the employee earns. This is about 75% of the average wage. It includes part-time employees, so many will be better off.


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