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Old 4th May 2009, 10:18 AM   #182
henryco
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Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 155
Originally Posted by metamars View Post
First off, I must point out again that I have very limitied knowledge and ability in these matters. I am presenting my observations as a very slightly educated guess, and not a strong assertion of fact.

If you look at p. 1260 of Second Edition of the Encyclopedia of Surface and Colloid Science[/url][/b] you see two spikes, in the DSC graph of raw kaolinite, figure 4 (a). The first one, which is completely missing in the Jones' DSC plots, is at what looks like 50 C. The second spike is at about 525 C.

In figure 4(b), they show a DSC for Kaolinite-DMSO. There are still spikes at 50 C and 525 C. There is also a new spike at about 180 C. The key observation which I make is that adding crap to the kaolinite doesn't move or remove raw kaolinite spikes. Is this always true? I frankly don't know. But, if it is true, then the Jones' samples are not kaolinite.

I hope SunStealer will comment on this.
1)
According to
http://www.minersoc.org/pages/Archiv...9/19-4-653.pdf
the enthalpy corresponding to this endothermic peak at 500C is about 40 kcal/mol thus ~ 0.65kJ/g
to be compared with 1.5 kJ/g for the peak registered with the blue curve (Fig 29): thus this endothermic peak would have been impossible to miss:
there is definitely no kaolinite in John's sample!
(On the other hand curves given earlier in this thread have shown that for another kind of thermite the tuning of the particles sizes allows to completely avoid the endothermic peak for Aluminum... since its possible i see no more reason why the absence of this peak in the chips DSC curves should be a concern anymore)


2) Because the authors was surprised that the paper by Tillotson was not clear on the conditions of the Tillotson DSC trace, it was necessary to contact him directly. Dr. Farrer contacted Tillotson directly ! : the red curve was registered in the air!

3) It'is quite obvious from the unusual profile of the aluminum rich particles that these was specifically designed not to meet the requirements of a high explosive but to provide efficient heat to the columns. The inert grey layers
also probably moderated the reaction to achieve exactly the same goal.
Optimize energy, reduce power as explained earlier by metamars just to
avoid the ejection of the hot material far away. As someone has also shown earlier in this thread up to nearly 50% of the heat could be focused toward the steel beam for specific types of thermites. I have no reason to doubt that the redhip nanothermite (nano because at least one type of particles , the Fe2O3 is ~120 nm) was also efficiently optimized and even better along this line, thanks to the inert greylayers and platelets Al and Si particles.

4) The ability of the combustion of an organic material to reach the temperatures necessary to melt iron is even worse at th microscopic scale than at the macoscopic scale, simply because at such small scales the dissipative effects are huge especially for the reactions that take place at the surface of the sample such as combustion with Oxygen in the air.
I'm really sorry but this is crucial point and for the time being the only feedback on this forum concerning that point sound like magical sentences.
And even on the JREF forum i dont want to discuss magical things...if you have serious arguments please expose them with references and computations

Thanks

F H-C

PS: The scientist standing just in front of a huge WTC "meteorite" in a well known video
says that it is molten metal and concrete fused together by the heat ... Is he a lyer or does he need another pair of glasses. Anybody can make the difference between distorted metal and previously liquid metal! A piece of molten metal from this meteorite was even sent to S Jones for analysis: he found it was mostly iron, previously molten iron! very low fractions of aluminium and sulfur (so not a corrosion process in this case!)

Last edited by Gaspode; 4th May 2009 at 10:24 AM. Reason: Fixed link
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