View Single Post
Old 17th February 2020, 01:49 AM   #9
Planigale
Illuminator
 
Planigale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: 49 North
Posts: 4,134
Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Long story short.

NZ, I am ashamed to say has incredibly ugly and frankly embarrassing stats in child abuse and scum parents/supposed guardians.

The latest is a little 4 year old dude who was beaten to an inch of his life and they say he will probably be permanently brain damaged if he makes it.

The cop in charge says it's the worst case he has seen.

We also have another issue, which is we have quite a few times had the entire family of the kids shutting up shop and refusing to make statements.

This is another one.

There are now calls to ditch the right to silence in these investigations

Personally, while I understand why it is there normally for extremely good reason, I say **** people's rights in kid abusing cases and just keep it for others.

We have a govt dept called the Serious Fraud Office which investigates serious financial crime that has more power than the cops and you don't have this right.

It seems a bit stuffed priorities to me that we treat cash as more serious than kids being beaten the **** out of.

I appreciate yanks probably won't agree given the whole ammendment constitution thing.




https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/a...ectid=12309161
In England some of these issues are dealt with by 'joint purpose'. If one of two parents killed a child but they refuse to give evidence against each other and each claim the other did it, they can both be convicted under joint purpose. This also occurs in gang killings where one member of a gang may have killed some one in an affray, all participants may be convicted of murder.

Secondly in England there is not an absolute right to silence, failing to make a statement without good reason can be interpreted negatively by the court.

“You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence.”
Planigale is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top