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Old 20th January 2021, 05:58 AM   #41
TragicMonkey
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Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
One I got people using a couple of times “iatrogenic “ - caused by a doctor. It has surprisingly many applications in IT.
It crops up a lot in healthcare IT, too, but the clinical staff hate seeing it used. To which we reply hey, saw off the correct leg next time, then.
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Old 20th January 2021, 06:26 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by TragicMonkey View Post
It crops up a lot in healthcare IT, too, but the clinical staff hate seeing it used. To which we reply hey, saw off the correct leg next time, then.

Yeah stumbled on a few cases but my work was usually after the SNOMED geeks had done their thing.
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Old 20th January 2021, 10:50 AM   #43
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obstreperous

learned about it today, doubt I will every actually use it.
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Old 20th January 2021, 11:16 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post

Swarf, a versatile word that can mean either a swoon (or the act of swooning), or the residue from metal machining.
I once designed a swarf collector, complete with 5-bin rotary bucket holder for separating different alloys!
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Old 20th January 2021, 11:42 AM   #45
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Ostrobogulous. Slightly and bizarrely risque.
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Old 20th January 2021, 02:05 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
Juicing - what you do to pigs piglets.
Sorry to be such a pedant in what is otherwise a joyous thread, but we need to have some consistency of language or what was the point of having an empire in the first place.
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Old 20th January 2021, 02:17 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by The Great Zaganza View Post
obstreperous

learned about it today, doubt I will every actually use it.
My mum always told me that I was being obstreperous. It was quite a normal word in our household.
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Old 20th January 2021, 02:17 PM   #48
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Otolith. An ear stone.
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Old 21st January 2021, 06:25 AM   #49
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Years ago, my work colleague tried to get our foreign boss to use odd slang words. He would use them in his own conversation to see if the boss would eventually pick up on it and use the words himself. These were words like "lollygagging".
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Old 21st January 2021, 06:29 AM   #50
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For you word/language aficionados, here is one I've never been quite sure about. How would you make the plural possessive of the word princess?

Singular = princess
Plural = princesses
Plural possessive = princesses'

The above seems correct to me, but I'm not sure about the pronunciation of the latter one.
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Old 21st January 2021, 07:14 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by Monza View Post
For you word/language aficionados, here is one I've never been quite sure about. How would you make the plural possessive of the word princess?

Singular = princess
Plural = princesses
Plural possessive = princesses'

The above seems correct to me, but I'm not sure about the pronunciation of the latter one.
I was taught that plural possessives that end in S are pronounced exactly like the plural--there's not an additional S sound, just a silent apostrophe. This isn't a new question for those of us whose surname ends in S.

"Look, it's the princess! What's she holding? Why, it's the princess's knife! Do princesses have special knives? Yes, the princesses' knives have extra grooves called 'blood gutters' that they may stab more effectively." In that example last three iterations are all pronounced the same. Also, stay the hell away from the royalty of that kingdom!
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Old 21st January 2021, 08:15 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Monza View Post
For you word/language aficionados, here is one I've never been quite sure about. How would you make the plural possessive of the word princess?

Singular = princess
Plural = princesses
Plural possessive = princesses'

The above seems correct to me, but I'm not sure about the pronunciation of the latter one.
I've always presumed the latter one is pronounced the same as the second, the added possessive meaning conveyed by context.

So, for example, one might say "The princesses' fortune was divided among the princesses," and the meaning is pretty clear. If one finds it is not, and there's some ambiguity as to which sense is meant, you'd best change the sentence. So, for example, you might not know which is meant if you say "The king's fortune was the princesses(')", but it would be clear if you said "The princesses were the king's fortune," or "The king's fortune was that of the princesses."
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Old 21st January 2021, 08:31 AM   #53
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When 2 princesses meet it usually means a battle to the death as only one can start the new hive. So largely a theoretical issue. I've pulled this from an entirely different domain of knowledge but that seems to be fashionable these days.
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Old 21st January 2021, 08:53 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by TragicMonkey View Post
I was taught that plural possessives that end in S are pronounced exactly like the plural--there's not an additional S sound, just a silent apostrophe. This isn't a new question for those of us whose surname ends in S.
Yes, come to think of it, this is what I've been taught too. I remember it bothered me on my first trip to London when I saw St. James's Park.
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Old 21st January 2021, 09:59 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by Monza View Post
Yes, come to think of it, this is what I've been taught too. I remember it bothered me on my first trip to London when I saw St. James's Park.
I was only speaking of pronunciation. St James's is the correct possessive for a single St James. If the park were dedicated to all the saints of that name it would be trickier: St James' would be technically correct but confusing. St Jameses' would make a degree of sense but be unwieldy.

It's easier with surnames. Marlon Wayans's family, the Wayans, live in the Wayans' stately home.
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Old 21st January 2021, 02:54 PM   #56
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Here's a word I just had occasion to use in another thread: Verisimilitude - apparent realism. It doesn't have to actually be realistic in order to have verisimilitude. A lot of science fiction relies on it while still having faster-than-light travel, blaster weapons, futuristic energy generation and laser swords. None of those things are realistic - many would be actually impossible in the real universe, but we like them because in context, they have verisimilitude.
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Old 21st January 2021, 07:05 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by Dr. Keith View Post
Sorry to be such a pedant in what is otherwise a joyous thread, but we need to have some consistency of language or what was the point of having an empire in the first place.
Oh **** off!
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Old 22nd January 2021, 03:53 AM   #58
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Susie Dent again
“ Word of the day is 'arsle': a 19th-century verb meaning to make no progress whatsoever on a job in hand - literally, to 'shuffle backwards'.”
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Old 22nd January 2021, 10:42 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
Oh **** off!
The pleasure is all yours.
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Old 22nd January 2021, 12:08 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Otolith. An ear stone.
Paroxysmal. As in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, which is caused by otoliths.
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Old 24th January 2021, 02:56 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by The Great Zaganza View Post
obstreperous

learned about it today, doubt I will every actually use it.
Get a cat.....
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Old 24th January 2021, 06:32 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Paroxysmal. As in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, which is caused by otoliths.
Which is what my dad has, which is why I know about otoliths.
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Old 24th January 2021, 06:39 PM   #63
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pseudepigraphically from Wikipedia "Pseudepigrapha (also anglicized as "pseudepigraph" or "pseudepigraphs") are falsely attributed works, texts whose claimed author is not the true author, or a work whose real author attributed it to a figure of the past."

Found while researching St Ignatius in respect to another thread.
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Old 24th January 2021, 06:47 PM   #64
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Here's a fun one I learned the other day. When you say "gosh" instead of "God", or "frick", or "heck" or "jeepers" to avoid a profanity, it is known as a minced oath.
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Old 24th January 2021, 08:19 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Which is what my dad has, which is why I know about otoliths.
Yup. My mother caused me to learn about them.
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Old 24th January 2021, 09:35 PM   #66
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Philtrum.
The vertical groove between the base of the nose and the border of the upper lip.

I remember reading it in a Superman book (novel, not comic book -- no pictures!) It was describing an alien race whose defining feature was the lack of one.
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Old 25th January 2021, 06:48 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
Philtrum.
The vertical groove between the base of the nose and the border of the upper lip.

I remember reading it in a Superman book (novel, not comic book -- no pictures!) It was describing an alien race whose defining feature was the lack of one.
Smooth philtrums are also a symptom of fetal alcohol syndrome. Not everyone who lacks a philtrum has FAS (or is an alien)...but once you know about it it's hard not to wonder when you notice people without one.
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Old 12th February 2021, 11:34 PM   #68
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Just heard the term

monocausotaxophilia

and I use it when appropriate, making sure that it will become appropriate in conversations.
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Old 20th February 2021, 01:00 PM   #69
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Mendacious - lying, untruthful and on and on.

It's amazing how many don't know this word, but they know lying as everyone does it.
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Old 25th February 2021, 05:52 AM   #70
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https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...218072064?s=12

Quote:
Word of the day is 'huff snuff' (16th century): one who shares their opinion far and wide but is quick to take offence if anyone disagrees.
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Old 25th February 2021, 09:23 AM   #71
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Poltroon: an utter coward.

Seen in recent James Gill column (nola.com) in reference to Senator John Kennedy and his ass-kissing cohorts

ETA: Gill usually has at least one word per column that I have to look up.
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Old 25th February 2021, 09:32 AM   #72
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Trahison des clercs - "treason of the intellectuals : the compromising of integrity by intellectuals who engage in political advocacy." Yeah, seeing a lot of that this century.



I was reminded of it by Hhellpop's eta above. I found this and other interesting expressions in Francis Wheen's "How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered The World"
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Old 25th February 2021, 09:45 AM   #73
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Farthingale. Flatulist (one who can, by expelling air from his/her anus, play tunes - see Le Petomane)
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Old 25th February 2021, 11:27 AM   #74
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Originally Posted by Spektator View Post
Farthingale. Flatulist (one who can, by expelling air from his/her anus, play tunes - see Le Petomane)
A vocation that many guys in college aspire to! Though not as numerous as flatuflagrationists.
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Old 28th February 2021, 01:55 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Here's a fun one I learned the other day. When you say "gosh" instead of "God", or "frick", or "heck" or "jeepers" to avoid a profanity, it is known as a minced oath.
This link led me to the word eggcorn, examples of which can be seen in the misused idioms thread.
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Old 3rd March 2021, 03:39 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...218072064?s=12


Quote:
Word of the day is 'huff snuff' (16th century): one who shares their opinion far and wide but is quick to take offence if anyone disagrees.

Taylor Swift?
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Old 3rd March 2021, 03:54 PM   #77
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Incommodious.
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Old 4th March 2021, 12:33 PM   #78
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
My mum always told me that I was being obstreperous. It was quite a normal word in our household.
Same here. I was often admonised for being obstreperous.



I like 'Sonder' as it describes a sensation that sometimes hits me when I'm out in public and I think it needs a word.

Etymology: Sonder is a neologism, coined by John Koenig for his online Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows. As such it has no evolution to trace.


The realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own.
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