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Old 1st May 2019, 11:39 AM   #1
therival58
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Lightbulb Red Light Therapy improves Inflammation

Has anyone heard of red light therapy to cure inflammation? It seems to be on the rise as an health tool, dubbed "Photomodulation".
Quote:
Photobiology is the study of the effects of non-ionizing radiation on biological systems. The biological effect varies with the wavelength region of the radiation. The radiation is absorbed by molecules in skin such as DNA, protein or certain drugs.
https://www.healthline.com/health/re...-does-it-work?
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Red light is thought to work by producing a biochemical effect in cells that strengthens the mitochondria. The mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell — it’s where the cell’s energy is created. The energy-carrying molecule found in the cells of all living things is called ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

By increasing the function of the mitochondria using RLT, a cell can make more ATP. With more energy, cells can function more efficiently, rejuvenate themselves, and repair damage.
Interesting results here:
https://uwm.edu/healthsciences/news/...ple-sclerosis/
Quote:
Using light therapy to treat multiple sclerosis

Through a study funded through the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Associate Dean and Professor in the College of Health Sciences Jeri-Anne Lyons, PhD (pictured above), hopes to demonstrate the positive impact of light therapy in treating muscle fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) uses red and near infrared light to decrease inflammation and neurodegeneration. Given the recent evidence supporting the clinical benefit of PBMT on muscle function in healthy individuals, Lyons and her co-researchers believe PBMT may also help people with MS.
...
“Light therapy holds a great deal of potential, but it is by no means a ‘magic bullet’,” said Lyons. “Dosage and frequency of treatment is key in this kind of therapy – too little, and patients may not see results. Too much, and there may be adverse outcomes. Our study aims to capture that fine line and reveal what steps may come next for developing PBMT as a viable treatment option for people with MS.”

Last edited by therival58; 1st May 2019 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 1st May 2019, 12:47 PM   #2
Dr.Sid
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Well years ago one friend of mine bought super expensive lamp which claimed similar result. One thing was clear. The thing cost 1000 times more that it should, based on the fact it was just LED array.
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Old 1st May 2019, 02:15 PM   #3
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At 5mm penetration depth, you barely breach the sub-cutis, so it is hard to see how RLT would be effective for muscle fatigue. I doubt there is more at work here than a good old fashioned heat lamp.
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Old 1st May 2019, 02:53 PM   #4
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Statement about how deep the light penetrates is always silly. It should be always accompanied by 'how much'. Red light can pass much deeper. Most flashlights will glow though palm, which is certainly more than 5mm. But how much of it passes through palm ? How much passes 5mm deep. Also this is one of the areas where skin color actually makes a difference.

Just another red flag.
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Old 2nd May 2019, 08:39 AM   #5
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What the heck does "a biochemical effect that strengthens the mitochondria" actually mean?
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Old 2nd May 2019, 08:44 AM   #6
The Great Zaganza
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wouldn't it be better to reduce inflammation?
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Old 2nd May 2019, 08:44 AM   #7
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Well, the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell, so...
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Old 2nd May 2019, 12:20 PM   #8
Hellbound
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Originally Posted by Myriad View Post
What the heck does "a biochemical effect that strengthens the mitochondria" actually mean?
Arguably, if applied correctly, superglue could fit that description.

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Old 2nd May 2019, 01:04 PM   #9
Dr.Sid
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Originally Posted by JayUtah View Post
Well, the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell, so...
So now it can generate power in moody light !
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Old 2nd May 2019, 10:10 PM   #10
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I prefer my inflammation reduced.
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Old 2nd May 2019, 11:08 PM   #11
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Is there any biochemically related woo that you do not believe?

No, it does not work. At least not any more than the normal relaxing effect of warmth on muscles.
Mitochondria can ONLY make energy from glucose. You want to make more energy in there? Eat more.
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Old 3rd May 2019, 07:22 AM   #12
Myriad
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Originally Posted by JayUtah View Post
Well, the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell, so...

Yeah, exactly. There should be a name for that particular maneuver in woo writing. One sentence makes a claim, and then just where you'd expect the next sentence to justify the claim, it instead promotes the claimed results.

"This investment opportunity makes money from stolen underpants. Money can be exchanged for goods and services, which makes it very valuable!"

"Our reactor produces energy by converting hydrogen into hydrino. The worldwide energy market is over 1.5 trillion dollars a year."
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Old 6th May 2019, 07:14 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by therival58 View Post
Has anyone heard of red light therapy to cure inflammation? It seems to be on the rise as an health tool, dubbed "Photomodulation".
Overall an honest and correct description of photomodulation or low-level laser therapy.

The article is wrong about the origins of LLLT which date from just after the first lasers in the 1960's, not 1990s experiments on plants in space.

The suggested mechanism is more indirect: "In LLLT that chemical substance is representated by the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase which is involved in the electron transport chain in mitochondria[12][18], which is the generally accepted theory.".
Mechanisms of action for light therapy: A review of molecular interactions
Quote:
Five decades after the first documented use of a laser for wound healing, research in light therapy has yet to elucidate the underlying biochemical pathways causing its effects. The aim of this review is to summarize the current research into the biochemical mechanisms of light therapy in order to better direct future studies. The implication of cytochrome c oxidase as the photoacceptor modulating light therapy is reviewed, as are the predominant hypotheses of the biochemical pathways involved in the stimulation of wound healing, cellular proliferation, production of transcription factors and other reported stimulatory effects.
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Old 6th May 2019, 08:24 PM   #14
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I have a kidney transplant. Someone explain to me how to get red light to impinge upon this internal organ's nephrons.
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Old 7th May 2019, 05:29 AM   #15
Myriad
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Originally Posted by jaydeehess View Post
I have a kidney transplant. Someone explain to me how to get red light to impinge upon this internal organ's nephrons.

I have a solution in mind but I don't think you'd like it.
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Old 7th May 2019, 11:52 AM   #16
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For what it's worth, the reality show Dr. K's Exotic Animal ER on Nat Geo deals with a veterinary practice in Florida. They seem competent and caring, and use LLLT often to stimulate wound healing.

I've no idea whether or not they're paying attention to exactly how well it works, or why they started using it.
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