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Tags favorite books , recommended books

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Old 30th March 2020, 01:28 AM   #521
MoeFaux
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Originally Posted by Cheetah View Post
Just finished The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins. Contemporary fantasy/horror or something. It's bizarre. It's weird. It's strange. It's great.

MUCH better than I expected. Enjoyed it immensely. Would love to know what others think.
Recommended!


12 young children were kidnapped by Father and raised in His library, as librarians. Each with their own area of expertise. Father's lessons were often cruel and violent. Carolyn, the main character, has mastered languages. All of them. They all believe Father to be God.
Then Father goes missing.
This sounds interesting just based on your descriptive words alone. Weird! Strange! Bizarre! I will take note of the title and thank you for the recommendation.

If you would humor me, I would like to suggest a title for you that I read when it was released last year, one which also could be described as Weird, etc. "Nothing to See Here," by Kevin Wilson. I read the review in the NYTimes Review of Books and went out and purchased it that same day, something I had never done before. The review began: "Good lord, I can't believe how good this book is."

GoodReads describes it as: "a moving and uproarious novel about a woman who finds meaning in her life when she begins caring for two children with remarkable and disturbing abilities."

It's not a meaty book. It's fun. I finished in cover to cover in one day, because I couldn't put it down. Weird. Bizarre. I liked it a lot, and thought about it for weeks afterwards. I will enjoy reading it again, too. Not sure if it's your cup of tea - but your suggestion made me think of it.

Cheers!
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Old 31st March 2020, 09:41 PM   #522
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Been on a huge crash-course on Russian history, lore and culture since last year for a project of my own. Just finished Laura Englestei's Russia In Flames:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...SuTgNox&rank=1

It was okay. Currently working on Ethan Pollock's Without the Banya We Would Perish:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...e-would-perish

What I've been finding is that there's precious little in English about a lot of the subjects I've found interesting, mainly regarding folklore and legends.
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Old 2nd April 2020, 10:25 AM   #523
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It is interesting, both library's closed (just as I was needing new books in my life) and I must rely on the books (100's of them) I have collected, all of which I have read.

What I'm finding is that there are several books that I read years ago, that are enjoyable re-reads. I'm enjoying John Sandford's "Prey" series again. I have all of Robert Parker's novels (that I love), and too many others to name.

I don't read much non-fiction, and don't read for education, I read to entertain myself, and it hasn't failed me yet.

And, I love humor. (Parker's Spencer novels are great for that, as are Carl Hiaasen's - another favorite) I would love to hear suggestions for other authors that can tell a good story and sometimes inject humor!

Thanks.
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Old 2nd April 2020, 11:09 PM   #524
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My daughter's 6th grade class is reading "Fever" about the 19th century yellow fever epidemic. (1870's I think)
This was on the list in January before the coronavirus was a thing. It is eerie.

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Old 3rd April 2020, 12:09 AM   #525
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Old 5th April 2020, 12:26 AM   #526
Cheetah
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Originally Posted by MoeFaux View Post
This sounds interesting just based on your descriptive words alone. Weird! Strange! Bizarre! I will take note of the title and thank you for the recommendation.

If you would humor me, I would like to suggest a title for you that I read when it was released last year, one which also could be described as Weird, etc. "Nothing to See Here," by Kevin Wilson. I read the review in the NYTimes Review of Books and went out and purchased it that same day, something I had never done before. The review began: "Good lord, I can't believe how good this book is."

Thanks!
I haven't read any Kevin Wilson books as far as I remember.
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Old 6th April 2020, 02:49 PM   #527
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I'm reading free library books with my Kindle, and I'm super happy with it so far.

The app recommended, so I downloaded, a thriller by an author that was new to me - Robert Galbraith. I know now that this is the nom de plume of JK Rowling. The Libby app that I used to browse the library tells you when fiction books are in a series, so I downloaded and started the first one - Cuckoo's Calling. It sounded like a beach-type read, which is what I'm looking for right now. Escapist fiction.

I did not get to page 3. It literally read like some of those bad fiction award nominees; it may as well have started with "it was a dark and stormy night." This person wrote Harry Potter? Were those books any good? People told me that they were. Absolutely brutal.

google books link

/rant

I'm most of the way through Alan Furst "Night Soldiers," which tracks a young Bulgarian's spy career path through the Russian Revolution, Spanish Civil War and WWII. I like it.
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Old 9th April 2020, 04:57 AM   #528
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Age of Reptiles (Collected, Volume 1) by Ricardo Delgado.

Holy crap how has this one flown under my radar for so long?

The collected first run of a comic run from 2009 to 2016, it's a wordless, dialogue, narrationless series of stories set in a fictionalized, stylized age of dinosaurs.

It's so wonderfully unusual, tales of blood feuds and "You killed my father, prepare to die" moments between dinosaurs told without dialogue or narration. There's not even sound effects in the panels.

The artwork is amazing, the gore is plentiful, and stories manage to actually be engaging, the dinosaurs given actual character and emotions.
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Old 9th April 2020, 06:04 AM   #529
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The Geometry of Meaning: Semantics Based on Conceptual Spaces, Peter Gärdenfors, MIT Press.

Concept formation must be described in terms that fit known facts about humans. The approach here is topological. I find it fascinating because it is amenable to treatment as a more general case in evolutionary terms; i.e., I can see its applicability to the entire animal kingdom.

To give you an idea of what this is about, an example:

Oakland is over the Golden Gate bridge from San Fran.

In this analysis, the use of "over" indicates spacial orientation from the speaker's point of view, making meaning in this case a form of perceptual topology. Clearly, Oakland is not physically floating over the bridge, but at the end of a path. It gets more complicated, but like good science, it's built out of many valid tidbits to build a solid framework.

All kinds of scientific and philosophical nuts to crack, which is what makes linguistics so fun.
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Old 24th May 2020, 11:48 AM   #530
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I just read a book that would translate to "But you don't look sick" (Men du ser ikke syk ut), by Ragnhild Holmås. It's about ME, and people's prejudice and attitudes in general towards what we call "invisible illnesses". How sufferers could probably have gone to school or work if they only had wanted it enough, or how a single vacation trip or visit to a coffee shop on a good day becomes evidence they are just lazy or pretending to be sick to game the welfare state.

I learned some interesting things from it, like that cancer was, incredibly, originally thought to be caused by weakness of character, and that cancer sufferers had to work hard to dispell this myth.

If you understand Scandinavian, it's well worth a read. Also a nice gift to prejudiced friends .
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Old 28th May 2020, 06:47 AM   #531
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With the ten or so Little Free Libraries within a few blocks of my house, the selection is pretty plentiful. Picked up John Grisham's The Rainmaker. I don't usually read those types of books but a while ago I got The Firm and enjoyed it.

This one was an easy read, but is virtually plotless. Daily grind of a law school student who scores a possibly big trial. Those two elements form the gist of the book. In great detail.

Still, it's what a "meh" book does -- effectively kill a few hours with something of mild interest.
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Old 28th May 2020, 07:01 AM   #532
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Received a nice hard-cover copy of Dune for my birthday in anticipation of the new film adaptation coming soon. Should make for a more pleasant reading than the tiny-print paperback I read previously.

Most things I read off my Kindle, but for books I really like, a good hardback is the way to go.
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Old 28th May 2020, 11:13 AM   #533
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I'm nearly finished Pete Rawlik's Reanimators, a fascinating and different take on the events of Lovecraft's Herbert West - Reanimator and The Shadow Out of Time which I intend to pillage for gaming ideas.
I notice that the book is now listed as the first in a series, excellent.

Also finished, in one sitting, t my partners annoyance is Jeff Mach's excellent There and Never, Ever Back Again. A somewhat different take on the tropes of Tolkeinein quests...

I'm on a bit of a Spanish Civil War kick, I've added the following to my pile (I was supposed to deliver a series of lectures on the SCW and it's connections to Ireland earlier this year but A Certain Virus disrupted this):
Laura Desfor Edles - Symbol and Ritual in the New Spain - The Transition to Democracy after Franco
Joan Maria Thomās - Roosevelt, Franco, and the End of the Second World War
Joan Maria Thomas - Roosevelt and Franco during the Second World War - From the Spanish Civil War to Pearl Harbor
David Joseph Dunthorn - Britain and the Spanish Anti-Franco Opposition, 1940-1950
Herb Southworth - Conspiracy and the Spanish Civil War - The Brainwashing of Francisco Franco
* I'm going to have to track down the rest of Southgate's work.
Sasha D. Pack - Tourism and Dictatorship - Europe's Peaceful Invasion of Franco's Spain
Michael Aaron Rockland - An American Diplomat in Franco Spain

In the non-fiction pile are:
Kacper Szulecki - Dissidents in Communist Central Europe Human Rights and the Emergence of New Transnational Actors
Guy R. Hasegawa - Villainous Compounds - Chemical Weapons and the American Civil War
* Now finished, an excellent work. Lots of althist ideas too.
James Waterson - The Ismaili Assassins. A History of Medieval Murder
Sudhir Venkatesh - Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets
Garrett Laurie - The Coming Plague Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance
* Finished. Mediocre.
Florence Tamagne - A History Of Homosexuality In Europe: Berlin, London, Paris 1919-1939
Curtis & Curtis - Jack the Ripper and the London Press

On the fiction side I'm reading Christianna Brand's Cockrill novels, currently Fog of Doubt. Finished are Sandford's Masked Prey (OK, but not his best work), Wilfred Greatorex's 1990, based on the old TV series, and John Scalzi's The Last Emperox. Upcoming are Joe Lansdale's Terror is Our Business , Maresca Ryan's A Murder of Mages and
Flint & Freer's All the Plagues of Hell.
After they the queue holds the three books in the Dark Waters Trilogy; Ghouls of the Miskatonic, Bones of the Yopasi and Dweller in the Deep and (eventually) the twenty nine Wild Cards books
I've also been dipping into my Doc Savage stash but I find them hard going. Lots of Ospreys for general research.

Earlier in lockdown I splurged on London and the Spanish Flu, perhaps 15-20 books on each. Then there is the work related reading (part of my role is assessing technology startups) and general research.
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Old 28th May 2020, 12:01 PM   #534
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Fitting times for The Plague by Albert Camus. And after that I will probably begin with The Mirror and The Light by Hilary Mantel.
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Old 29th May 2020, 01:54 PM   #535
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Originally Posted by catsmate View Post

Also finished, in one sitting, t my partners annoyance is Jeff Mach's excellent There and Never, Ever Back Again. A somewhat different take on the tropes of Tolkeinein quests...
Sounded good so I bought it. Really enjoying it so far. Thanks
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Old 29th May 2020, 10:03 PM   #536
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Another thumbs up for The Library At Mt. Char mentioned above.... Very different and enjoyable. Haven’t seen anything else from the author though.

Currently reading Jeff Van DerMeer’s new one, “Borne”. Deals with a very “apocalyptic” scenario, a young scavenger/survivor, and a biological “thing” she finds which proves to be much more than she suspected....
Excellent so far.
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