ISF Logo   IS Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Computers and the Internet
 


Welcome to the International Skeptics Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.
Reply
Old 15th January 2020, 11:19 PM   #1
Segnosaur
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 14,455
Question: How to install Linux w/o USB or DVD

Got a rather unique situation here, just wondering if anyone has a way around it...

I bought a cheap (used) laptop off eBay (an old Dell Latitude 2120), with the intention of installing Linux on it. The computer currently has Windows 7.

So, I downloaded the Linux Mint ISO, used a program called Rufus to make a USB drive bootable. However, it looks like the computer is set to boot from the Hard disk first before the USB. I attempted to go in to the BIOS but it looks like there the BIOS is locked and you need a password to change the boot order (which I don't have).

So does anyone have any idea about the best way to proceed? (Note that I would prefer to have the Laptop to be Linux only; i.e. no 'dual boot' with a separate Linux partition, or running Linux on top of Windows)

Some of the ideas that I was thinking of:
- Is there any way the BIOS can be unlocked without the password? (I suspect not, since that would defeat the whole point of the password.)
- Is there a way to force the computer (once windows is running) to execute the ISO? (I've tried wincdemu, but that just ends up mounting the ISO as a disk rather than executing the Linux boot sequence)
- Can Windows be removed from the hard drive (perhaps with a format), so that the boot sequence skips over the HDD and boots from the USB? (That sounds like the easiest solution, but I don't want to run the risk of wiping out Windows but not having Linux installed either, leaving it completely unusable)
__________________
Trust me, I know what I'm doing. - Sledgehammer

I'm Mary Poppin's Y'all! - Yondu

We are Groot - Groot
Segnosaur is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 01:55 AM   #2
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 12,269
The manual is here https://downloads.dell.com/manuals/a...nual_en-us.pdf

Remove the CMOS battery as per above.
See https://www.dell.com/support/article...=en#Shortcut_3


PS check the required tools before you start. Opening laptops is a PITA, especially if you get something fiddly out the way then find you need some obscure tool.
__________________
"Your deepest pools, like your deepest politicians and philosophers, often turn out more shallow than expected." Walter Scott.

Last edited by Wudang; 16th January 2020 at 01:57 AM.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 02:38 AM   #3
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
- Have you asked the person you bought it from for the password?
- Reading here, try F12 on startup to change the boot order only this time - someone says that works without having to enter the password and once the Linux is installed you will want to have it boot from HD again anyway
- At the link they say if you can verify your ownership to Dell, they ask you for a serial number that's shown in the BIOS and generate a password to unlock it. Here is a program that promises to do exactly this. The site looks legit but as always better check with a virus scanner before executing.
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars

Last edited by Childlike Empress; 16th January 2020 at 02:46 AM.
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 03:40 AM   #4
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 12,269
Try CE's ideas first. Laptop internal connectors are a fiddly pain.
__________________
"Your deepest pools, like your deepest politicians and philosophers, often turn out more shallow than expected." Walter Scott.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 09:19 AM   #5
Segnosaur
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 14,455
Originally Posted by Childlike Empress View Post
- Have you asked the person you bought it from for the password?
I had sent an email to the seller, but hadn't heard back from them. (To be honest, they might not have even known themselves... I purchased it on ebay, and the seller looked like a store that resells refurbished machines.)
Quote:
- Reading here, try F12 on startup to change the boot order only this time - someone says that works without having to enter the password and once the Linux is installed you will want to have it boot from HD again anyway
Tried that... the But the only option for the boot order was the hard drive.
Quote:
- At the link they say if you can verify your ownership to Dell, they ask you for a serial number that's shown in the BIOS and generate a password to unlock it. Here is a program that promises to do exactly this. The site looks legit but as always better check with a virus scanner before executing.
This actually worked. The program was able to generate the BIOS password and I can now boot from the USB.

So thanks. I now have Linux up and running.
__________________
Trust me, I know what I'm doing. - Sledgehammer

I'm Mary Poppin's Y'all! - Yondu

We are Groot - Groot
Segnosaur is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 09:21 AM   #6
Segnosaur
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 14,455
Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
Try CE's ideas first. Laptop internal connectors are a fiddly pain.
Yeah, mucking about with a laptop's hardware would certainly be a last resort. (I've mucked about with desktop hardware before, but laptops have far too little tolerance for messing up)
__________________
Trust me, I know what I'm doing. - Sledgehammer

I'm Mary Poppin's Y'all! - Yondu

We are Groot - Groot
Segnosaur is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 09:39 AM   #7
theprestige
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 41,297
Return the laptop. Get a refund. Only buy used computers that come with a complete set of passwords and other necessary ownership information.
theprestige is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 10:28 AM   #8
Segnosaur
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 14,455
Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Return the laptop. Get a refund. Only buy used computers that come with a complete set of passwords and other necessary ownership information.
The computer was extremely cheap, and since it provided exactly what I needed (a low end machine that won't be my primary computer but will just allow me to play around with things), I'd rather not return something when the replacement will cost me more money.

And I'm not worried about passwords since, apart from the BIOS, passwords were irrelevant (since I was wiping out everything anyways.)
__________________
Trust me, I know what I'm doing. - Sledgehammer

I'm Mary Poppin's Y'all! - Yondu

We are Groot - Groot
Segnosaur is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 12:09 PM   #9
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
Originally Posted by Segnosaur View Post
This actually worked. The program was able to generate the BIOS password and I can now boot from the USB.

So thanks. I now have Linux up and running.

Nice. Welcome to the family!

Your little machine seems to be towards the lower end but inside the range I described the other day as being able to smoothly run a modern Linux distribution. What's your first impression?
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 04:01 PM   #10
Segnosaur
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 14,455
Originally Posted by Childlike Empress View Post
Nice. Welcome to the family!

Your little machine seems to be towards the lower end but inside the range I described the other day as being able to smoothly run a modern Linux distribution. What's your first impression?
Actually I've been a Linux user for quite some time (going way back to Red Hat back a few decades ago). I've also set up a Linux machine to serve as a file server/media box for my TV a while ago. But lately most of my usage has been through work (with me using Windows for my regular web browsing, writing, graphics work, etc. at home)

I was planning on seeing if I could go full-linux at home (and abandon my windows machines); however, I do have concerns about functionality/compatibility. (I know Linux has a significant amount of software available, much of it open source. But there may be glitches... e.g. can it access my VPN at work? Is it compatible with my web cam and other hardware? etc.)

So, I figure I would buy a low end computer to install Linux on, and try to see if it can fulfill my needs for the next few months.
__________________
Trust me, I know what I'm doing. - Sledgehammer

I'm Mary Poppin's Y'all! - Yondu

We are Groot - Groot
Segnosaur is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 16th January 2020, 04:41 PM   #11
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
Originally Posted by Segnosaur View Post
Actually I've been a Linux user for quite some time (going way back to Red Hat back a few decades ago). I've also set up a Linux machine to serve as a file server/media box for my TV a while ago. But lately most of my usage has been through work (with me using Windows for my regular web browsing, writing, graphics work, etc. at home)

I was planning on seeing if I could go full-linux at home (and abandon my windows machines); however, I do have concerns about functionality/compatibility. (I know Linux has a significant amount of software available, much of it open source. But there may be glitches... e.g. can it access my VPN at work? Is it compatible with my web cam and other hardware? etc.)

So, I figure I would buy a low end computer to install Linux on, and try to see if it can fulfill my needs for the next few months.

I take that as "runs smoothly" then. On hardware safely in the two-digit $ range. Have fun and good luck with your special needs!
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 17th January 2020, 03:08 AM   #12
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 12,269
I use a linux laptop for work when travelling. I can get into my company's AWS servers using OpenVPN and then using a built in remote desktop to rdp to a windows server and an ssh2 client to linux servers. I dont remember how I did it as it was just too easy.

The only differences I see are some slight variations in document formatting that are really only visible if I have both LibreOffice writer and word open in front of me. I modify docs and send them back to our technical writer for checking and she's said nothing and believe me when I say she would let me know.
I develop with intellij which works the same on linux and windows. The only drawback with Linux is I love notepad++ for quick edits and little jobs and I haven't got an exact replacement on linux. Exact in as letting my fingers do the thinking for me.
__________________
"Your deepest pools, like your deepest politicians and philosophers, often turn out more shallow than expected." Walter Scott.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 19th January 2020, 08:52 AM   #13
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
For an incredibly easy search function on Windows, try https://www.voidtools.com/

Everything.exe is instantaneous after first loading at startup.
__________________
Over we go....

Last edited by xterra; 19th January 2020 at 09:11 AM.
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st January 2020, 03:12 AM   #14
P.J. Denyer
Philosopher
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,259
Originally Posted by Childlike Empress View Post
Nice. Welcome to the family!

Your little machine seems to be towards the lower end but inside the range I described the other day as being able to smoothly run a modern Linux distribution. What's your first impression?
Haha, I've got a reasonably smooth and perfectly usable install on an Acer Aspire One notebook (admittedly with a RAM upgrade to a dizzying 2Gb!). That's a 32bit, 1.66GHz Intel Atom! It came with Win 7 and was unusable.
__________________
"I know my brain cannot tell me what to think." - Scorpion

"Nebulous means Nebulous" - Adam Hills
P.J. Denyer is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st January 2020, 02:07 PM   #15
commandlinegamer
Philosopher
 
commandlinegamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mazes of Menace
Posts: 8,964
The other option would be to install on another computer (assuming you had a spare), then transfer to the intended machine.
__________________
He bade me take any rug in the house.
commandlinegamer is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st January 2020, 02:22 PM   #16
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
Haha, I've got a reasonably smooth and perfectly usable install on an Acer Aspire One notebook (admittedly with a RAM upgrade to a dizzying 2Gb!). That's a 32bit, 1.66GHz Intel Atom! It came with Win 7 and was unusable.

Good for you. As I said at the link, I have it running smoothly (minus 2020 commercial websites) on an X30 with 512 MB RAM. My range was aimed at people who want to try it by just grabbing the most recent release of [prominent desktop distribution x] and be on the safe side. Many of the distros have stopped to put out 32-bit versions in recent years. And the further you go down on the hardware scale, the more you will have to think about a lean Desktop Environment etc.
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 08:49 AM   #17
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
I want to divert this thread just a little. If it seems too much a diversion, I'll report it and ask for a split.

Some time ago, in a different thread, Childlike Empress mentioned setting up Linux on a bootable flash drive. At the time, I didn't do it.

My computer is a laptop running Windows 10. I am not going to buy another machine, but I did want to try Linux. I downloaded a Linux/Mint distro, and the UUI software. I had an unused 4Gb flash drive on which to install Linux. The installation was straightforward, and relatively quick. After it was done, I restarted the computer and changed the boot sequence so that USB was first . Again, this was straightforward.

I restarted the computer again with the flash drive in place. It booted fine, Mint ran, I could get online, etc.

Then I shut down the computer, removed the flash drive, and started the computer again. It booted as expected, no problems but the system time had changed to UTC. I reset it to my time zone, and restarted again in Windows. All was fine.

I thought perhaps the error was the lack of a persistence file, so I reinstalled Linux on the flash drive with a 1 Mb persistence file. I restarted with the flash drive in place, played with Firefox and LibreOffice for a while, and shut down.

On reboot into Windows, the time was back to UTC.

Does anyone know the reason for the time changing, and how to stop it? (A quick online search didn't help.)
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 10:34 AM   #18
grmcdorman
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,272
Linux normally stores the time in the BIOS (i.e. for when the computer's off) in UTC. Windows, by contrast, usually stores it there in local time. This is why you get the issue.

I believe there is a registry setting or similar to get Windows to store the BIOS time in UTC; I did this a very long time ago and forgot it. There may be a way to get Linux store the BIOS time in local time, but it will vary by distro and is less optimal (because, in Linux, you can have multiple users in different time zones).
__________________
"Hello. My name is Inigo Skywalker. You are my father. Prepare to die."
grmcdorman is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 11:13 AM   #19
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
Originally Posted by grmcdorman View Post
Linux normally stores the time in the BIOS (i.e. for when the computer's off) in UTC. Windows, by contrast, usually stores it there in local time. This is why you get the issue.

I believe there is a registry setting or similar to get Windows to store the BIOS time in UTC; I did this a very long time ago and forgot it. There may be a way to get Linux store the BIOS time in local time, but it will vary by distro and is less optimal (because, in Linux, you can have multiple users in different time zones).

Here's a tutorial: https://www.howtogeek.com/323390/how...-dual-booting/
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 01:16 PM   #20
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
CE, does this solution work even if Linux is on a flash drive, not in a dual-boot situation?
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 01:43 PM   #21
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
Originally Posted by xterra View Post
CE, does this solution work even if Linux is on a flash drive, not in a dual-boot situation?

I never heard about such a problem and wasn't sure if I understood your post correctly. If you only have booted from USB, this shouldn't have happened at all, because the whole point of a Live distribution is that it doesn't change anything on the PC it boots on. That would be a bug and it should be found easily as Mint is such a prominent distribution. No sign of that.

Any chance that you started the installation process just to see what it looks like, went beyond the time settings and then abandoned it when it came to partitioning the hard drive?

If not, if the change to systemd is permanent depends on how the Mint USB distribution behaves. I don't know that. Just try. If it doesn't remember, you should turn to the Windows registry entry to make it permanent, as explained at the bottom of the linked tutorial. Seems pretty straightforward as well.
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars

Last edited by Childlike Empress; Yesterday at 01:45 PM.
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 02:25 PM   #22
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
I wanted to create a stand-alone portable bootable Linux system on a USB flash drive, not add Linux to my hard drive to make a dual-boot computer.

The bootable flash drive gave me a working Mint system, but permanently changed the time in the BIOS.

grmcdorman suggested that I change the BIOS value to UTC, but that's not what I want. I want to keep local time in Windows. (Actually, I have Windows set to show both local and UTC, but all timestamps are in local time. UTC is there just for my convenience in looking at various websites.)

I don't care if Mint shows me UTC only, as long as when I reboot into Windows, I have local time.

Maybe there is a solution somewhere? Any suggestions about where to look?
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 02:54 PM   #23
Childlike Empress
Ewige Blumenkraft
 
Childlike Empress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ivory Tower
Posts: 17,837
You didn't answer my question. "Any chance that you started the installation process just to see what it looks like, went beyond the time settings and then abandoned it when it came to partitioning the hard drive?"

edit: And you apparently didn't read the link I've provided which suggests the same for fixing the problem from the Windows side as novaphile does in the post below.
__________________
Audiatur et altera pars

Last edited by Childlike Empress; Yesterday at 03:04 PM.
Childlike Empress is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 02:58 PM   #24
novaphile
Quester of Doglets
Moderator
 
novaphile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,219
Give this a go and let us know how you do...

Using regedit, add a DWORD value with hexadecimal value 1 to the registry:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\TimeZoneInformation\RealTimeIsUniversal
__________________
We would be better, and braver, to engage in enquiry, rather than indulge in the idle fancy, that we already know -- Plato.
novaphile is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 03:09 PM   #25
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
CE, I didn't abort the process. I told the installer to give me a 1Gb persistence drive. It completed successfully.


novaphile, maybe I am not being clear. I don't want Windows to set UTC as the BIOS default. I want it to give me local time which is UTC-8. Editing the registry to default to UTC doesn't help. Linux is going to reset it to UTC anyway.


Windows - local time


Linux - don't care.
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 03:42 PM   #26
RecoveringYuppy
Philosopher
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 9,627
Not sure why you care about BIOS time but you can tell Linux to act like windows I believe. I don't do it myself but I think this should do it:

timedatectl set-local-rtc 1 --adjust-system-clock

Might want to wait for second opinions before trying.

Last edited by RecoveringYuppy; Yesterday at 03:44 PM.
RecoveringYuppy is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 03:50 PM   #27
grmcdorman
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,272
Why do you need the BIOS time to be local time? You will normally never see it, unless you're going into the BIOS setup or if you set a time for your computer to automatically power on.

To clarify, this is what is happening:

On boot:
Windows loads the time from the BIOS (a battery-backed store on the motherboard).

Without the registry setting, it assumes it is local time and sets the time it shows to you on that basis. If the time in the BIOS is not local time in any way (such as in UTC or off in some other way) the time it sets will be wrong. The time it shows to you is based on the time zone you set in your control panel, and will be local time.

With the registry setting, it assumes the BIOS time is UTC and sets the the time it shows to you on that basis. Again, if the time is wrong or not UTC, the time it sets will be wrong. The time it shows to you is based on the time zone you set in your control panel, and will be local time.

In either case, provided the BIOS clock is correct for the option you choose, the time you see after booting will be the same (your local time zone). In my case, my BIOS is in UTC, and I am in the Eastern Standard time zone, GMT + 4. So my BIOS clock, right now, should be 21:53, but my clock in Windows is showing 17:53.

Linux usually runs in the second case. As Childlike Empress said, though, usually Linux, when booted from a flash drive or other non-persistent media, will try not to change system settings. Unfortunately, it still needs to make an assumption about what time zone the BIOS clock is in; it could be UTC or some (unknown) local time zone.

Another question: After you booted into Linux, did you adjust the time it was showing to you?

EDIT: Cross-posted with Recovering Yuppy. His command, unfortunately, is temporary; a change to the startup/shutdown scripts or settings is required to make it permanent. This varies by distro. You've got Mint; there should probably be instructions for that if you prefer to go that route. Personally, I'd suggest using UTC for your BIOS clock; it's transparent and generally works better.
__________________
"Hello. My name is Inigo Skywalker. You are my father. Prepare to die."

Last edited by grmcdorman; Yesterday at 03:54 PM.
grmcdorman is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 03:55 PM   #28
novaphile
Quester of Doglets
Moderator
 
novaphile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,219
Hmm...

The setting I gave you was to tell windows how to interpret the BIOS setting, not to change Windows to show GMT.
__________________
We would be better, and braver, to engage in enquiry, rather than indulge in the idle fancy, that we already know -- Plato.
novaphile is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old Yesterday, 04:09 PM   #29
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,420
Thank you all.



I will experiment with various settings ... or maybe get a cheap used laptop just for Mint.
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Computers and the Internet

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:08 PM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum began as part of the James Randi Education Foundation (JREF). However, the forum now exists as
an independent entity with no affiliation with or endorsement by the JREF, including the section in reference to "JREF" topics.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.