ISF Logo   IS Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Computers and the Internet
 


Welcome to the International Skeptics Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.
Reply
Old 29th June 2018, 06:26 AM   #1
isissxn
Rough Around the Edges
 
isissxn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Deep Storage
Posts: 4,933
Headers in Microsoft Word

I think I used to know how to do this, but I've forgotten. I can't seem to figure it back out, and Google isn't helping. Anyone pretty familiar with Microsoft Word?

Basically, I am writing a term paper. It's all one document. The cover page has no header. The next two pages (abstract and table of contents) each have a lowercase Roman numeral as the header (in this case, ii and iii). I have all that done.

BUT then the subsequent pages are required to be headed with regular numerals, beginning with 1. And it's all one document. I cannot figure out how to make this change happen and still keep the numerals. Can anyone advise? I'm sure it's something fairly simple that I'm missing.
isissxn is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th June 2018, 06:34 AM   #2
SleepingWeasle
Thinker
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 129
Under Layout, select break, next page. That will create a separate section in Word. Then, in back section, modify the header and footer however you like. Make sure to unclick link to previous for both the header and footer though.
SleepingWeasle is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th June 2018, 06:59 AM   #3
paulhutch
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Blackstone River Valley, MA
Posts: 2,272
This official article from Microsoft should help.
https://support.office.com/en-us/art...b-b39f6d99c7ed

Note it was the second link when I Google searched on the literal thread title.
paulhutch is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th June 2018, 07:07 AM   #4
isissxn
Rough Around the Edges
 
isissxn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Deep Storage
Posts: 4,933
Thanks.

As for the Google results, there's my problem. I should have just googled something simple like the thread title. I was afraid it would be too broad and I was trying not to lose time, so I was googling long phrases trying to be more specific. Sometimes that works (or seems to). Other times it just confuses Google - woops.

Thanks, and sorry for the dumbs.
isissxn is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 2nd July 2018, 09:49 PM   #5
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 59,166
Section Breaks are a pain in the bum. I hate them.
__________________
Wake up, you cardboard.
- Pixie of Key
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 3rd July 2018, 01:01 AM   #6
Kid Eager
Philosopher
 
Kid Eager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 6,674
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Section Breaks are a pain in the bum. I hate them.
Tell me about it. the worst is the section break combined with changing the page layout from portrait to landscape and back again with another section break.

The main body of the document is fine, but trying to make the headers and footers play nice with the widening then narrowing again of the page is a nightmare. I'm increasingly putting wider tables at the end of the document in appendices to partially avoid the issue...
__________________
What do Narwhals, Magnets and Apollo 13 have in common? Think about it....
Kid Eager is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 3rd July 2018, 01:19 AM   #7
Worm
Master Poster
 
Worm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,322
One of my constant battles is trying to keep things straight when deleting pages from sections that change between landscape/portrait. Word just changes things around at whim it seems like.

To the point where I now am sometimes making an effort to keep entire documents in either landscape or portrait, and splitting them into separate documents if I have to change

At least if you're tweaking html/css, you can go behind the scenes and see what is happening, Word just hides everything and makes you guess.
__________________
"Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent" Isaac Asimov

Not all cults are bad - I've joined a cult of niceness
Worm is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 3rd July 2018, 05:46 PM   #8
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 59,166
Originally Posted by Worm View Post
One of my constant battles is trying to keep things straight when deleting pages from sections that change between landscape/portrait. Word just changes things around at whim it seems like.
There is an internal logic to it. But the logic is pretty obscure and hard to nail down.

The function in Word that I wish more people would understand is Styles. Mastery of Styles lets you work magic.
__________________
Wake up, you cardboard.
- Pixie of Key
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2018, 02:00 AM   #9
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 11,339
One of my favourite authors on the topic of Word
http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog...-must-die.html

Some people suspect that this is why the standards for Word compliance, instead of saying exactly how (e.g.) tables should behave, say they should behave however they behave in Word because nobody can precisely describe how Word behaves, or is supposed to. To the degree normally required of standards bodies that is.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2018, 03:00 AM   #10
Worm
Master Poster
 
Worm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,322
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
The function in Word that I wish more people would understand is Styles. Mastery of Styles lets you work magic.
This.
__________________
"Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent" Isaac Asimov

Not all cults are bad - I've joined a cult of niceness
Worm is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2018, 03:35 AM   #11
elgarak
Illuminator
 
elgarak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,318
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
There is an internal logic to it. But the logic is pretty obscure and hard to nail down.

The function in Word that I wish more people would understand is Styles. Mastery of Styles lets you work magic.
Except that Word makes it very hard to understand how the Styles work. Its UI in this regard is abysmally bad. (That's not to say that there's anything that Word does well. It's UI is always worse than it could be, and it is extremely buggy. Comparatively.)

(Like many, I thought for a long time that's just the way it is. Then I switched to Mac and stumbled upon a word processor called Nisus Writer. Its UI of Styles is a tropical sunny day to Word's arctic twilight.)
elgarak is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2018, 03:43 PM   #12
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 59,166
Personally, not having much need for powerful formatting options, I do most of my writing in text only. That said, I do have LibreOffice installed.
__________________
Wake up, you cardboard.
- Pixie of Key
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 5th July 2018, 02:28 AM   #13
elgarak
Illuminator
 
elgarak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,318
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Personally, not having much need for powerful formatting options, I do most of my writing in text only. That said, I do have LibreOffice installed.
I believe that few people really have need for those (except if they work in production/printing, but then they use different apps). At most, a markdown editor with a nice preset of stylesheet (which contains the fonts and margin information – most people don't need to change them, they just need to be set up once) would be more than enough.

Still, Word is forced upon many to use, despite it being bad or unsuited for the job. To name a few, enterprise employees (really, if the company has shilled out for the Office suite, there's little you can do about it), team workers (I wrote science papers. We could do it with raw text, or LaTeX – both would have been accepted by the journals – but nooo, the seniors in the team insisted of having something nice to look at during writing, and they only knew and accepted Word. Funnily, the journals gradually removed all of Word's functionality; it's a raw submission format only that needs to be read once and gets copied directly into things like InDesign or LaTeX. They didn't even like us writers using styles!), or novelists (submitting and manuscript changes are generally communicated by a Word file with change tracking and commenting, which is not yet completely supported by alternatives, though LibreOffice is coming close).

I kept thinking about the OP, and why there's a need for changing numbering in different sections of the document. It's a leftover from working with paper only. If you write the main text, you don't know how many pages the table of contents end up to be or which page numbers you need to reference, so you just do it separately at the end, and number it separately. With modern software, this has become obsolete. So why is it still insisted upon? I think it's just because it's clinging to procedure... and there's a component of student direction – how well can you follow instructions, and how well can you solve this problem we throw at you.

Last edited by elgarak; 5th July 2018 at 02:37 AM.
elgarak is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 5th July 2018, 02:52 AM   #14
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 11,339
It still bothers me how many documents are produced in printer-friendly rather than online viewing format. It especially bugged me in the IT arm of a major bank where we had shed loads of doc in word and continually nagged not to print. Some of us with dual monitors would rotate one at 90 for easier reading of A4/Letter docs.
The kindle format is a good step forward I think but some way to go.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 5th July 2018, 06:49 PM   #15
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 59,166
Originally Posted by elgarak View Post
I believe that few people really have need for those (except if they work in production/printing, but then they use different apps). At most, a markdown editor with a nice preset of stylesheet (which contains the fonts and margin information most people don't need to change them, they just need to be set up once) would be more than enough.
A common trope repeated in the IT industry is the 80/20 rule - 80% of people use 20% of features.
__________________
Wake up, you cardboard.
- Pixie of Key
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 5th July 2018, 11:19 PM   #16
elgarak
Illuminator
 
elgarak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,318
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
A common trope repeated in the IT industry is the 80/20 rule - 80% of people use 20% of features.
It's worse: As i wrote, it's what people NEED, not what they USE. If I present a normal office drone Word user with a markdown editor, they balk because they cannot easily change the font. They USE the font changing of Word. But they don't actually need it.
elgarak is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 5th July 2018, 11:25 PM   #17
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 59,166
Originally Posted by elgarak View Post
It's worse: As i wrote, it's what people NEED, not what they USE. If I present a normal office drone Word user with a markdown editor, they balk because they cannot easily change the font. They USE the font changing of Word. But they don't actually need it.
Oh yes, I'll absolutely grant that people change fonts more than they need to.
__________________
Wake up, you cardboard.
- Pixie of Key
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 6th July 2018, 04:30 AM   #18
elgarak
Illuminator
 
elgarak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,318
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Oh yes, I'll absolutely grant that people change fonts more than they need to.
I recall the pre-PC-era where people (mostly in schools and universities) preferred to use the "Script" typeface on their IBM Selectrics. It's not a new thing.

During my PhD time, we had a female student as a non-science assistant working for us. She was allowed to use our PCs for her stuff. One time, she was printing a lab report which I happened to pick up. She had used one of those free-to-download crap fonts. "That's an ugly font." [whine] "How can you say that? It's beautiful!" I calmed her down and explained that it's hard to read (kerning too close, spaces too small, lines too long, line spacing too small), she has to give it to someone who has to grade it but doesn't want to read it, so she shouldn't frustrate them by making it too hard to read, and if I were the person to grade it (I HAD been the person who had to grade a lab report of hers a few weeks earlier), I would grade it worse just because it's so *********** hard to read. She changed it back to Times New Roman. Boring but safe. (I'm actually a nice guy and would not have changed the grade because of the font, but on a bad day I would have made her sweat by refusing it and demanding a revision. I didn't told her that.)

Last edited by elgarak; 6th July 2018 at 04:43 AM.
elgarak is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 6th July 2018, 04:51 AM   #19
Wudang
BOFH
 
Wudang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: People's Republic of South Yorkshire
Posts: 11,339
My first documents were written on an IBM mainframe running MVS with Script/DCF. It used GML (a cousin of HTML) except the tags were for example :h1 instead of <h1>. With a few settings at the top and knowledge of maybe 10 such tags you could produce good looking documents.
Wudang is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 6th July 2018, 03:29 PM   #20
commandlinegamer
Philosopher
 
commandlinegamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mazes of Menace
Posts: 8,763
Originally Posted by elgarak View Post
I didn't told her that.
What the name of that rule where someone pointing out anothers flaw, invariably makes one of there own.
__________________
He bade me take any rug in the house.
commandlinegamer is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th July 2018, 12:10 AM   #21
The Norseman
Meandering fecklessly
 
The Norseman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 7,998
Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
One of my favourite authors on the topic of Word
http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog...-must-die.html

Some people suspect that this is why the standards for Word compliance, instead of saying exactly how (e.g.) tables should behave, say they should behave however they behave in Word because nobody can precisely describe how Word behaves, or is supposed to. To the degree normally required of standards bodies that is.
That's a great article. I've read long and long about the differences between MS Word and programs like my personal fave, WordPerfect and one of the greatest reasons I like WP is because of this formatting difference WP essentially creates documents similarly to HTML/CSS with formatting tags that cascade from the opening tag until closed, rather than assigning everything as a container which is then "painted" with a specific format.

This article
http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2014/10...icrosoft-word/

is a great explanation which instantly made sense (to me at least) about why it's so frustrating doing things with MSWord and so easy with WP.

I'm saddened every time I have to fire up my Win7 VM just in order to use WPX8 these days because the world's bestest word processing software doesn't. work. with. linux.

The problem with pretty much every other word processing program out there, they've tried diligently to copy MS Word in their design philosophy only in order to try and be as compatible as possible. Even Open/Libre Office.

I've taught myself LaTeX and will still rarely use it and I've even tried HTML/CSS with the Prince formatting engine which actually is a pretty good combo as the HTML is also useful for regular webpages too, but ultimately I think WP just does what I want, how I want, with a comprehensible structuring method that's logical and (especially with Reveal Codes) easily fixed.
The Norseman is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th July 2018, 07:02 AM   #22
elgarak
Illuminator
 
elgarak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,318
Originally Posted by The Norseman View Post
That's a great article. I've read long and long about the differences between MS Word and programs like my personal fave, WordPerfect and one of the greatest reasons I like WP is because of this formatting difference — WP essentially creates documents similarly to HTML/CSS with formatting tags that cascade from the opening tag until closed, rather than assigning everything as a container which is then "painted" with a specific format.

This article
http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2014/10...icrosoft-word/

is a great explanation which instantly made sense (to me at least) about why it's so frustrating doing things with MSWord and so easy with WP.

I'm saddened every time I have to fire up my Win7 VM just in order to use WPX8 these days because the world's bestest word processing software doesn't. work. with. linux.

The problem with pretty much every other word processing program out there, they've tried diligently to copy MS Word in their design philosophy only in order to try and be as compatible as possible. Even Open/Libre Office.

I've taught myself LaTeX and will still rarely use it and I've even tried HTML/CSS with the Prince formatting engine which actually is a pretty good combo as the HTML is also useful for regular webpages too, but ultimately I think WP just does what I want, how I want, with a comprehensible structuring method that's logical and (especially with Reveal Codes) easily fixed.
This is a very interesting article, though I think the author gives the people responsible for the development of Word way too much credit. They don't think about which kind of text or document model they apply – they think in much more simplistic and mechanistic terms.

The example he gives reveals that. I didn't know that before: If you have a selection of text with direct formatting in it, and apply a (paragraph?) style, the direct formatting is retained if less than 50% of characters have the direct formatting applied.

As he points out, no writer has ever thought of the percentages of characters in italics in their text. To make in abundantly clear: This rule makes no sense, AT ALL, to anyone who has worked with texts, EVER. It makes it crystal clear that the people responsible for the development do not care what Word is used for, and how formatting is used by writers to change the function and meaning of sections of text. It gets worse in that this rule, as much as can find out on the quick'n'dirty, seems to be hardcoded, and cannot be changed or turned off by the user, and is not communicated to the user in any way (Microsoft does not make a manual anymore. There's not even a PDF you can download. There's only a knowledge base on the web, but the few times I accessed it, I found it's very bad at teaching you workflows. It tells you which buttons to press to achieve a certain [technical term], but it doesn't teach you why you would want, need or prefer to apply [technical term]).

NB: There's a workaround in that you need to preserve the formatting by applying a character style, then apply a paragraph style. Now, correct me if I'm wrong (since I do not have a copy of Word available right now, and have not worked with it extensively with it for a few years), but... does Word make it easily recognizable what style is a paragraph or a character style? I have worked for years with it and never recognized any of that. So much so that when I learned that other programs do distinguish between character and paragraph styles, I was convinced that Word does not do it, only to learn that it does, but hides the fact rather deep in its dialog windows.

NB2: The author of the article applies the same basic fault to all other WYSIWYG word processors, like Apple's Pages. This is patently untrue: There are three WYSIWYG word processors (all on the Mac) I know extensively, and they all behave much better than Word (Pages, Nisus Writer, Mellel). The problem is not the philosophic document model the developers apply; it's that Word is badly programmed with disregard of its basic function and its users' needs.

Last edited by elgarak; 8th July 2018 at 07:16 AM.
elgarak is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th July 2018, 12:26 AM   #23
The Norseman
Meandering fecklessly
 
The Norseman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 7,998
Originally Posted by elgarak View Post
This is a very interesting article, though I think the author gives the people responsible for the development of Word way too much credit. They don't think about which kind of text or document model they apply they think in much more simplistic and mechanistic terms.

The example he gives reveals that. I didn't know that before: If you have a selection of text with direct formatting in it, and apply a (paragraph?) style, the direct formatting is retained if less than 50% of characters have the direct formatting applied.

As he points out, no writer has ever thought of the percentages of characters in italics in their text. To make in abundantly clear: This rule makes no sense, AT ALL, to anyone who has worked with texts, EVER. It makes it crystal clear that the people responsible for the development do not care what Word is used for, and how formatting is used by writers to change the function and meaning of sections of text. It gets worse in that this rule, as much as can find out on the quick'n'dirty, seems to be hardcoded, and cannot be changed or turned off by the user, and is not communicated to the user in any way (Microsoft does not make a manual anymore. There's not even a PDF you can download. There's only a knowledge base on the web, but the few times I accessed it, I found it's very bad at teaching you workflows. It tells you which buttons to press to achieve a certain [technical term], but it doesn't teach you why you would want, need or prefer to apply [technical term]).

NB: There's a workaround in that you need to preserve the formatting by applying a character style, then apply a paragraph style. Now, correct me if I'm wrong (since I do not have a copy of Word available right now, and have not worked with it extensively with it for a few years), but... does Word make it easily recognizable what style is a paragraph or a character style? I have worked for years with it and never recognized any of that. So much so that when I learned that other programs do distinguish between character and paragraph styles, I was convinced that Word does not do it, only to learn that it does, but hides the fact rather deep in its dialog windows.

NB2: The author of the article applies the same basic fault to all other WYSIWYG word processors, like Apple's Pages. This is patently untrue: There are three WYSIWYG word processors (all on the Mac) I know extensively, and they all behave much better than Word (Pages, Nisus Writer, Mellel). The problem is not the philosophic document model the developers apply; it's that Word is badly programmed with disregard of its basic function and its users' needs.
Hey, awesome! Glad you read the article; I thought it was pretty insightful and a unique take on the whole subject.

One of my major complaints with word processing in general, is that as has been said earlier in this thread, using styles is just simply Best Practices but at least at MS, they teach them as "advanced skills" so the massive majority of users will apply essentially random formatting as they go; which is actually great for software like WordPerfect. Still, I wish I knew this stuff about fifteen years ago when I was very active in writing documents and creating forms for a small business with MS Word. I created over five hundred forms, templates, handouts and other formal docs, not including regular letters and other daily correspondence.

Anyway, to answer your questions, I don't think Word makes it terribly easy to see a paragraph or character style. They had finally (after a decade or more) made a quasi-"reveal codes" feature but I had quit using Word before, I think, it was available. I've read lots of comments on it from people who know WP's reveal codes and Words and it is said that it's nowhere near as powerful nor does Word actually reveal *all* the codes (as WP can).

I would defer to your experience with Apple products since I've never used any (except for about a year in high school writing lab) but I do know that it's true with other Windows applications. My understanding is that the software devs wanted to be so compatible with MS formats that they pretty much copied faithfully as close as they could how they thought Word was written. Since WP has been around since day one, that's probably the only reason they have such a different workflow but I don't know for certain.
The Norseman is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st July 2018, 04:12 PM   #24
Belgian thought
Graduate Poster
 
Belgian thought's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,999
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
There is an internal logic to it. But the logic is pretty obscure and hard to nail down.

The function in Word that I wish more people would understand is Styles. Mastery of Styles lets you work magic.
^
This

We saved a company a shed loads of money transferring their brochures (60 plus pages in 12 languages) from DTP to Word.

It was a long process but now they can edit and amend when they wish. Personalise the brochure with simple find and replace, update the index (including all the right page links etc.) and create PDFs in hours rather than weeks.

The company was sceptical at first but, when we showed them the Word generated PDFs against their DTP produced documents, they bought it.

Arthwollipot is correct. It takes a while to learn but once done, great results can be achieved.
__________________
... er, that's it

Last edited by Belgian thought; 21st July 2018 at 04:13 PM.
Belgian thought is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st July 2018, 06:28 PM   #25
isissxn
Rough Around the Edges
 
isissxn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Deep Storage
Posts: 4,933
Oh hey, I forgot I'd started this thread after I'd turned in the assignment in question! Looks like it got a bit livelier after the fact.

I'm glad to hear I'm not the only person who struggles with that sort of task in Word. As it happened, I never did quite figure it out perfectly. I ended up turning in the research paper with a teeny-tiny "i" visible at the top of the cover page. (I did successfully switch to regular numeration for the pages following the abstract and table of contents!)

I got lucky, and the prof didn't notice. I got a 50/50. Phew!

I might not be so lucky with future instructors, though. I know that. So I'm going to look into this issue further.

Last edited by isissxn; 21st July 2018 at 06:30 PM. Reason: gramarzzz
isissxn is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Computers and the Internet

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:34 AM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum began as part of the James Randi Education Foundation (JREF). However, the forum now exists as
an independent entity with no affiliation with or endorsement by the JREF, including the section in reference to "JREF" topics.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.