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Old 9th January 2018, 05:42 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by kellyb View Post
I seriously doubt anything like malls are going to come back, but before malls it was the local diner, more smaller city amusement parks with season passes, riding city trolleys in the 30s and 40's, and stuff like that. I've suspected something else would come along next, but maybe not. Maybe texting and video games at home is going to stay the new way of passing time for the foreseeable future. Interesting question.
It all evolves. Whatever happened to chautauquas? Technically they're still around, but pfft... c'mon, they're just coasting on irony at this point.

Wikpedia: [chautauqua]



I remember when I was in 2nd year and joined the science undergraduate society... we were organizing the 25th annual tricycle race fundraiser, and we had something like 5 competitors. One of the faculty who had organized the first one back when he was a student in the 1950s told me, "20 years ago, there were 100 competitors and a thousand spectators. This needs to die so something new can take its place."
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Old 23rd January 2018, 12:41 AM   #42
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Amazon Go gives cashierless retail a go:

https://www.seattletimes.com/busines...enience-store/
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Old 23rd January 2018, 03:56 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by JJM 777 View Post
Amazon Go gives cashierless retail a go:

https://www.seattletimes.com/busines...enience-store/
Should be cheaper than other places, not more expensive. I guess the prices will come down when they work out that they do not have to worry about shoplifting.
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Old 23rd January 2018, 07:09 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by rjh01 View Post
I think you are onto something with this last paragraph. People will want to play games and if the only way to do it is to use machines that cost big $ then the only way to do it is to go to a shop that has that equipment. VR games and laser tag, as you say, would be good examples. 10 pin bowling is another.

Then ball sports of any time would be another. This includes both playing and watching them.
Maybe that might be the future of failed malls (plenty of them around, some completely shut down, others barely limping along)- put a few shops like food court and others that people are still going to, and turn the rest of it into a giant lasertag game or whatever.

One reason local teens dont go to the mall here anymore is that it was actively driving them away- didnt want those noisy kids hanging around... Now its come back to bite them as those noisy kids were probably 50% of the actual sales, only small amounts, but a lot of them- day after day

And of course after being run off by security a few times, when it came to actually buying stuff, they went elsewhere or online, no way were they going back there to buy anything.
So really, many cut their own throats in that sense, those future customers just arent coming back again- ever
Interestingly, small downtown specialty shops are booming as the mall sits mostly empty
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Old 23rd January 2018, 08:53 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by JJM 777 View Post
Amazon Go gives cashierless retail a go:

https://www.seattletimes.com/busines...enience-store/
The local teevee had a story about that this morning. Apparently there was a problem with long lines!
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Old 23rd January 2018, 11:15 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
The local teevee had a story about that this morning. Apparently there was a problem with long lines!
How did the lines manifest? (no checkout)

Oh, or was it lines to get *in* to the store?
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Old 23rd January 2018, 11:17 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by rjh01 View Post
Should be cheaper than other places, not more expensive. I guess the prices will come down when they work out that they do not have to worry about shoplifting.
We'll probably have to wait and see if that's true.

I'm not sure how the technology actually works, but anything can be gamed. Just a matter of whether it's too much trouble for small items.
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Old 10th June 2018, 01:55 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Where and how will you buy the deposition material? (Or the printer, for that matter?)
Can we print it?
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Old 11th June 2018, 10:35 AM   #49
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In the UK Big department store chain 'House of Frazer' are closing half of their stores in an attempt to stay afloat.

Poundworld a chain of 'cheap shops' with everything for a pound (more or less there are some more expensive items these days) has just gone in to receivership

Marks and Spencers have announced they are closing a hundred of their stores.
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Old 11th June 2018, 04:48 PM   #50
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My local medium size town has a thriving High Street with a good mix of shops, pubs, cafes etc, my nearest large town has a noticable number of empty shops and an increasing number of charity and 'cheap' shops. The difference so far as I can see is that the former has plentiful free parking right in the middle while the latter has a very expensive multistory right at one end.
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Old 12th June 2018, 02:28 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
The difference so far as I can see is that the former has plentiful free parking right in the middle while the latter has a very expensive multistory right at one end.
20 years ago I had a store on the main street of the small city where I live. Didn't get much walk-in traffic and parking was a nightmare.

We moved to a suburban location into a store that was twice the size for half the rent and plenty of parking. Business increased dramatically. Turns out that being in the center of town is no advantage when your customers have to make a special trip anyway.

When we moved we expected a downturn, so we started a website and sold stuff mail order. After a few years local sales overtook mail-order, which was fortunate because online competition was getting fierce. We finally closed our doors not due to lack of business, but because we had too much and the boss couldn't handle it.

Originally Posted by Captain_Swoop
In the UK Big department store chain 'House of Frazer' are closing half of their stores in an attempt to stay afloat.

Poundworld a chain of 'cheap shops' with everything for a pound (more or less there are some more expensive items these days) has just gone in to receivership

Marks and Spencers have announced they are closing a hundred of their stores.
Don't know about the UK, but around here there have always been retail chains going under - and others popping up to replace them. In my experience the ones that last the longest are those who stock what customers want and provide better service, rather than trying to compete on price alone.

Some people only care about price and will buy the cheapest crap even though it's lower quality and the savings aren't worth it. I would not want those customers in my store. I go to the supermarket across town because they have better quality food and always have plenty of staff on the checkouts, and I have given up buying cheap clothes because they don't last and the selection is getting poorer. So I may pay 10% more for groceries or 2-3 times the price for some other stuff, but it's worth it - and I am not rich.
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Old 13th June 2018, 01:31 PM   #52
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The largest mall in America is getting closer to approval in Northwest Miami-Dade

Originally Posted by Miami Herald
The largest mall in America moved closer to winning a key approval in Miami-Dade on Monday, as a county planning board gave a thumbs up to a $4 billion retail theme park that expects 30 million visitors a year.

American Dream Miami promotes itself as a local alternative to Disney World, and a shopping and entertainment destination spanning more than 6 million square feet and large enough to employ 14,000 people once it opens...

The project by Triple Five, the Canada-based developer of Minnesota's Mall of America, also expects to generate roughly 100,000 vehicle trips per day to a 175-acre triangle of wetlands and pastures where I-75 meets Florida's Turnpike...
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/loca...210642844.html
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Old 13th June 2018, 04:07 PM   #53
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Fashion retail chain 'New Look' just posted a 75 million loss. Looking at restructuring (again)
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Old 13th June 2018, 05:26 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
My local medium size town has a thriving High Street with a good mix of shops, pubs, cafes etc, my nearest large town has a noticable number of empty shops and an increasing number of charity and 'cheap' shops. The difference so far as I can see is that the former has plentiful free parking right in the middle while the latter has a very expensive multistory right at one end.
You clearly don't have a Wal-Mart, which in the USA has turned thousands of small and medium town shopowners into minimum wage employees.
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Old 14th June 2018, 06:37 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by Roger Ramjets View Post
Don't know about the UK, but around here there have always been retail chains going under - and others popping up to replace them. In my experience the ones that last the longest are those who stock what customers want and provide better service, rather than trying to compete on price alone.
House of Fraser (HoF) are a bit of a special case because they are iconic and HoF certainly didn't try to compete on price. When I was growing up, they typically had the biggest (in cities) or only (in big towns) department store and tended to be the only outlet for designer goods in the area.

A trip to Binns in Darlington (our closest HoF store) was a rare occurrence because my parents didn't buy that sort of thing, but might be countenanced before Christmas so I could pick up a bottle of Yardley perfume for my Gran. Mum might treat herself to a silk(ish) scarf but she certainly wouldn't buy large pieces of clothing. We'd also likely get tea and cake at the cafe - living the high life indeed in mid-70s Britain.

OTOH the local swells would buy most of their clothing there as they would have the local concessions for the designer brands.

I suppose with the growth of chains like Harvey Nichols to attract the real high end spend, and the brands having their own outlets, upper middle spend chains like HoF have been struggling to find a place in the market.

Even though I've been able to afford to shop in HoF for nearly 30 years, I wouldn't dream of doing so. If it's business attire, I'll get it made (suits) or buy it from a specialist gentleman's outfitter. If it's casual attire then it's far too expensive for my tastes. The other departments such as furniture or electronics are the sorts of things I would buy online.

If I absolutely, positively, had to buy from a department store, I - and most of the people I know - would go to John Lewis instead. As very comfortably off middle-aged people, we should be HoF's demographic, but we wouldn't go.
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Old 14th June 2018, 06:39 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
You clearly don't have a Wal-Mart, which in the USA has turned thousands of small and medium town shopowners into minimum wage employees.
Wal-Mart bought one of our supermarket chains, ASDA but haven't done in the UK what they've done in the US. Whether it's by design (different markets and so on), local planning constraints (only large towns and cities would allow something the size of a Wal-Mart so there's plenty of local competition already) or they haven't yet got round to things is a good question.
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Old 14th June 2018, 06:56 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
You clearly don't have a Wal-Mart, which in the USA has turned thousands of small and medium town shopowners into minimum wage employees.
No, but we have two ASDAs, one a few miles either side. That's the UK equivalent and owned by Walmart. Either of them would actually be more hassle to go to, probably wouldn't take any longer (maybe quicker even) but it would be a less pleasant experience, differences in history and the way land is allocated and used means the big stores tend to get built in odd places where they can find the land rather than having been planned as part of town and highway extensions as tends to be the case in the US, parking is also more restricted due to the cost of land so even at out of town shopping centres you're more likely to spend time driving round looking for a space compared to in the US. Then there's the 'pleasure' of using ASDA itself...
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Old 14th June 2018, 02:12 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by The Don View Post
House of Fraser (HoF) are a bit of a special case because they are iconic and HoF certainly didn't try to compete on price. When I was growing up, they typically had the biggest (in cities) or only (in big towns) department store and tended to be the only outlet for designer goods in the area.

A trip to Binns in Darlington (our closest HoF store) was a rare occurrence because my parents didn't buy that sort of thing, but might be countenanced before Christmas so I could pick up a bottle of Yardley perfume for my Gran. Mum might treat herself to a silk(ish) scarf but she certainly wouldn't buy large pieces of clothing. We'd also likely get tea and cake at the cafe - living the high life indeed in mid-70s Britain.

OTOH the local swells would buy most of their clothing there as they would have the local concessions for the designer brands.

I suppose with the growth of chains like Harvey Nichols to attract the real high end spend, and the brands having their own outlets, upper middle spend chains like HoF have been struggling to find a place in the market.

Even though I've been able to afford to shop in HoF for nearly 30 years, I wouldn't dream of doing so. If it's business attire, I'll get it made (suits) or buy it from a specialist gentleman's outfitter. If it's casual attire then it's far too expensive for my tastes. The other departments such as furniture or electronics are the sorts of things I would buy online.

If I absolutely, positively, had to buy from a department store, I - and most of the people I know - would go to John Lewis instead. As very comfortably off middle-aged people, we should be HoF's demographic, but we wouldn't go.

Binns in the Boro was the same. a special trip. If you wanted a Department store the 'rest of us' went to Debenhams or BHS over the road.

We had Uptons on Linthorpe Road as well, and Tower House. Both good department stores in their day.

House of Frazer have suffered from neglect and mismanagement for decades, ever since the owner had to sell the company because of his gambling debts.
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Old 14th June 2018, 06:13 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by ServiceSoon View Post
The old model of viewing brick & mortar verse eCommerce channels are dated and one-dimensional. The existence of a physical presence has been correlated with higher combined sales by geographical area. The numbers tell us that brick and mortar stores provide a financial benefit to the overall value of companies. For that reason, they will continue to play a part in commerce.
Reality says otherwise.
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Old 14th June 2018, 06:31 PM   #60
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I was in PetSmart the other day and thought, "they have this nailed". Pet Smart combines, services, experiences and retail sales all in the same place. In addition to all the stuff you need for your pet, they host adoption groups for dogs and cats, have dog trainers, veterinarians, groomers and a pet hotel in their stores. They've clustered all the stuff you can't go to Amazon for in their stores, built around the retail. The retail that stays only retail is what is going to end up dying.
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Old 15th June 2018, 01:01 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
Reality says otherwise.
Reality disagrees with your claim about it, but I suspect it strongly depends on country.

There's no shortage of retail here...
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Old 15th June 2018, 04:52 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
Reality says otherwise.
No it doesn't.

Nike, for example. Heavily into both Ecommerce and brick and mortar retail.
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Old 15th June 2018, 08:13 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by TragicMonkey View Post
I used to prefer online shopping because there were more choices...but then Amazon let just anybody sell stuff, so now page after page is full of cheap Chinese crap, flooding out results that you might want to buy with endless heaps of stuff you wouldn't pay even the seventeen cents they're asking for (and then waiting two months to get your stuff, which will be in the wrong size and, for some reason, covered in dirt). Now at least if you go to a physical store you stand a chance that the product you buy might actually resemble the product you choose.
This.
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Old 15th June 2018, 08:21 AM   #64
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Not to worry, Chinese AI will figure it all out in 2035 and tell you what line to stand in.
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Old 15th June 2018, 12:38 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by Apathia View Post
This.
Agreed. I just did 3 rounds of fraud via Amazon.

It was just a cheap item (RCA branded vinyl record lint brush) but exhausting to go pick it up at the courier's dropoff, open it at home and discover it was counterfeit and useless, pack it back up, another trip to the courier pickup, stand in line, monitor the return, confirm the refund...

After the 3rd one I decided to just walk to Best Buy.
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Old 15th June 2018, 12:41 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by Roger Ramjets View Post
20 years ago I had a store on the main street of the small city where I live. Didn't get much walk-in traffic and parking was a nightmare.

We moved to a suburban location into a store that was twice the size for half the rent and plenty of parking. Business increased dramatically. Turns out that being in the center of town is no advantage when your customers have to make a special trip anyway.
This probably depends on how the city's set up. A donut city will suffer as you describe, because nobody lives within walking distance of the store.

Vancouver's in a different situation: if you're store is downtown, there's 1 million potential customers whose condos are within walking distance, nobody needs a parking space. Most people here don't even need a car to do most of their shopping, although it's nice to have one for those one-offs that are hard to carry.
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