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Old 1st February 2018, 01:48 PM   #81
theprestige
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Originally Posted by lionking View Post
Same in Australia. We have stopped across the counter supply of codeine based pain relievers, but pharamists can prescribe them. I don't think they charge for this service.
Fascinating. Why wouldn't they charge, though? Becoming a pharmacist requires a significant investment of time and money, to get the training, get the certification, get the license, etc. Being able to prescribe government-regulated medicines seems like one of the unique benefits of making that investment. How else are they supposed to recoup their investment, if not by charging for the services that investment makes possible?
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Old 1st February 2018, 02:25 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Fascinating. Why wouldn't they charge, though? Becoming a pharmacist requires a significant investment of time and money, to get the training, get the certification, get the license, etc. Being able to prescribe government-regulated medicines seems like one of the unique benefits of making that investment. How else are they supposed to recoup their investment, if not by charging for the services that investment makes possible?
My assumption is that they still charge a dispensing fee, just not a diagnosis/prescirbing fee.


ETA: personally, I find this troubling, as there's a conflict of interest. In BC, MDs aren't allowed to sell prescription meds or charge for tests or charge for allied health services. They need to keep the diagnosis separate from the treatment as much as possible, so as to neutralize the incentive to overprescribe, over-order tests, over-refer to allied health, &c.

And it's not always possible. Surgeons, for example, will evaluate a patient's suitability for the surgery they will then go ahead and perform.
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Old 2nd February 2018, 08:40 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by blutoski View Post
My assumption is that they still charge a dispensing fee, just not a diagnosis/prescirbing fee.
Right, but why not? Again, the ability to prescribe drugs represents a substantial investment in education and licensing. Why would the pharmacist not seek to recover that investment?
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Old 2nd February 2018, 10:28 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Right, but why not? Again, the ability to prescribe drugs represents a substantial investment in education and licensing. Why would the pharmacist not seek to recover that investment?
Good question. It's possible they can't? (regulatory?)

Just as a comparison, here in BC, physicians don't charge for prescribing either. They charge for the consultation regardless of outcome. The rationale is to not incentivize prescribing/referring/testing.
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Old 4th February 2018, 04:40 AM   #85
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In the UK you pay a fixed fee when you collect your NHS prescription, this is usually a less than the actual cost of the item.
For some things the doc will tell you to buy an over the counter yourself as it costs less than the fee.
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Old 18th February 2018, 12:50 PM   #86
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I'm doing my online continuing education units to renew my Pharmacy Tech certification and license this spring. Among the offered units for Pharmacists and Pharmacy technicians was one on Homeopathy. It was a free-bie, so I took it hoping it would present informative ways to steer patients away from these bogus products.

Instead it's a positive piece presenting the advantages of Homeopathy, though repeating that it's no substitute for conventional treatments and efficacious for only minor ailments and symptoms that are subject to home remedies. It also repeats the "advantage" of safety, since Homeopathic products are so diluted that they don't even mask the identifying symptoms of a chronic illness. It does not cite the most recent research that finds Homeopathy no more effective than placebo.

Here's the content: http://www.powerpak.com/course/content/115139

PowerPak is widely used by Pharmacists and Pharmacy Techs in the USA for their continuing ed needs. Gosh! It's no surprise then that a pharmacist might recommend a Homeopathic.
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Old 19th February 2018, 02:56 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by bytewizard View Post
Where there is demand there will always be supply. Are doctors prescribing homeopathic "medication"? Or do the pharmacies keep it in supply because idiotic customers request/purchase it. Either way, a homeopathic remedy salesperson must be the easiest occupation in the world.
Yes to the embiggened and embrowned!!!
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Old 19th February 2018, 02:59 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Apathia View Post
I'm doing my online continuing education units to renew my Pharmacy Tech certification and license this spring. Among the offered units for Pharmacists and Pharmacy technicians was one on Homeopathy. It was a free-bie, so I took it hoping it would present informative ways to steer patients away from these bogus products.

Instead it's a positive piece presenting the advantages of Homeopathy, though repeating that it's no substitute for conventional treatments and efficacious for only minor ailments and symptoms that are subject to home remedies. It also repeats the "advantage" of safety, since Homeopathic products are so diluted that they don't even mask the identifying symptoms of a chronic illness. It does not cite the most recent research that finds Homeopathy no more effective than placebo.

Here's the content: http://www.powerpak.com/course/content/115139

PowerPak is widely used by Pharmacists and Pharmacy Techs in the USA for their continuing ed needs. Gosh! It's no surprise then that a pharmacist might recommend a Homeopathic.
More precisely, homeopathic is a mere placebo.
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