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Tags Amanda Knox , Italy cases , Meredith Kercher , murder cases , Raffaele Sollecito

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Old 5th December 2021, 10:43 AM   #2041
pgwenthold
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Originally Posted by Numbers View Post
Knox and three other women lived in the cottage flat where the murder of one of them, Kercher, took place. No credible evidence shows that Knox was ever in Kercher's bedroom, where Kercher was sexually assaulted and murdered. While the whole cottage, especially the flat where Kercher lived, may be considered a crime scene, the rape - murder scene is specifically Kercher's bedroom
Yeah, to say she was "at the scene of the murder" but "she wasn't there when it happened" seems like odd phrasing.

I have been to Dealey Plaza. But would I say that I was at the scene of the assassination. No, I was in the same location where the assassination occured, but a "scene" is an action that includes when it happened.

If she wasn't there when the murder occured, then I wouldn't place her "at the scene of the crime." And that is irrespective of the question of whether she was ever even in the room.

But she cleaned up all her DNA from the room (and left Guede's behind....)
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Old 5th December 2021, 12:39 PM   #2042
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Originally Posted by pgwenthold View Post
OK, I will admit I know very little about this case, so can't vouch for the veracity of anything. However, I have heard an interview with Amanda Knox. Take it FWIW, but her statement is that the interviewers were insisting that she must just not be remembering things, and was repressing it. They kept drilling that into her, you need to remember these things. Ultimately, she says, yeah, maybe I can remember that stuff happening.
Don't sweat it. None of us know everything. Me, I just found out that after signing on to Mignini's fantasies in 2007 in the Kercher murder case, Judge Micheli slapped him down in the Narducci case.

Me, I thought for sure that the interrogation had been recorded, and was soon to be leaked. That never happened, and it's me who gets after Vixen or Peter Quennell for saying some big reversal is on its way, which never happens.

Welcome to the club of those of us who don't know everything.
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In a thread titled "Who Killed Meredith Kercher?", the answer is obvious. Rudy Guede and no one else.
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Old 5th December 2021, 01:04 PM   #2043
pgwenthold
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Originally Posted by Bill Williams View Post
Don't sweat it. None of us know everything. Me, I just found out that after signing on to Mignini's fantasies in 2007 in the Kercher murder case, Judge Micheli slapped him down in the Narducci case.

Me, I thought for sure that the interrogation had been recorded, and was soon to be leaked. That never happened, and it's me who gets after Vixen or Peter Quennell for saying some big reversal is on its way, which never happens.

Has anyone actually contradicted her version of the interrogation? I don't mean someone baselessly denied it, but are there actual resources that claim the interrogation went a different way?
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Old 5th December 2021, 01:42 PM   #2044
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Originally Posted by pgwenthold View Post
Has anyone actually contradicted her version of the interrogation? I don't mean someone baselessly denied it, but are there actual resources that claim the interrogation went a different way?
The only somewhat detailed narrative of specifics within the interrogation I found came from Mignini himself. It was the 2010 interview he gave to CNN's Drew Griffin, the one where Mignini danced around the concept of "spontaneous statement".

It is probably googleable.

It's the one where Mignini had to defend not giving Knox lawyer-protection, as mandated by the Italian code. He defended with Griffin continuing with Knox despite this, telling her if she wished to continue with "spontaneous statements", he'd simply act "as if a notary" in recording them.

It was not until the Boninsegna decision as well as the ECHR ruling on calunnia that courts started calling out the interrogation for what it was.

But the two primary sources for detailing it are Knox's book, as well as Mignini's CNN interview with Drew Griffin.
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Old 5th December 2021, 01:57 PM   #2045
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Originally Posted by pgwenthold View Post
Has anyone actually contradicted her version of the interrogation? I don't mean someone baselessly denied it, but are there actual resources that claim the interrogation went a different way?
At trial interpreter Anna Doninno gave her account of the interrogation. However, she did not arrive until 12:30 am, when she described that the interrogation had already broken down.

She then told the court that instead of restoring order through accurate interpretations, that she became a 'mediator'.

She even defined what a 'mediator' does, meaning what she did next. She joined in the assault on Knox that Knox must be having amnesia.

Donnino changed the narrative from lying to amnesia. The police never once thought that Knox might be telling the truth.

Note, Donnino did not claim that Knox was simply refusing to remember as an attempt to deceive the inquisitors.... she told Knox a story about her own amnesia brought on by trauma.

Her mediation was successful and order was restored. It was at that point that Knox began "remembering", not in the vein of bringing new info to the room, but by confirming what the police were telling her.....

..... which before Donnino arrived Knox was vocal about not remembering. Apparently, at that point, disagreeing with the Police's version meant one was a liar. Donnino said, no, it means you have amnesia because of trauma. Before that, Knox had been hit and called a liar. Once Donnino arrived and Knox began "remembering" she was no longer hit or called a liar.

Donnino's testimony is also googleable, and translated.

Between Knox, Mignini and Donnino a reasonable version of the interrogation can be reconstructed. None of them speak of an evil genius, Knox, purposely pulling the wool over their eyes.
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Last edited by Bill Williams; 5th December 2021 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 5th December 2021, 03:31 PM   #2046
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Originally Posted by Vixen View Post
In my experience, when someone was described as 'South African' in England, people assumed they are white.
That sounds like a result of the Boer War connection. Most Americans would assume black primarily or white, and to a lesser extent, 'colored' (mixed). Amanda knew Guede was black, even if she couldn't remember his name. But I'll remind you that it wasn't Knox who brought Lumumba into the interrogation, but Ficarra.
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Old 5th December 2021, 06:15 PM   #2047
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
....

Yes, Knox was at the scene of the murder but so was Mignini. But neither were there at the time the crime was committed.
Originally Posted by Numbers View Post
Knox and three other women lived in the cottage flat where the murder of one of them, Kercher, took place. No credible evidence shows that Knox was ever in Kercher's bedroom, where Kercher was sexually assaulted and murdered. While the whole cottage, especially the flat where Kercher lived, may be considered a crime scene, the rape - murder scene is specifically Kercher's bedroom.

The entire cottage flat where Kercher lived was a crime scene as it was the site of a break-in, short stay, and escape by a burglar who committed thefts and a sexual assault and murder (in Kercher's bedroom) during his short stay. Also part of the crime scene was the grill over the ground level window, apparently used by the burglar to reach Kercher's flat. The ground level flat may also be a crime scene, depending on whether or not the blood stains detected there, which may have been positive for human DNA by PCR testing, were indeed related to the crime. The scientific police data do not claim that the blood stain found by the light switch in the down-stairs flat was cat blood, although other down-stairs blood stains are claimed (on insufficiently verifiable alleged evidence) to be from a cat.
Originally Posted by pgwenthold View Post
Yeah, to say she was "at the scene of the murder" but "she wasn't there when it happened" seems like odd phrasing.

I have been to Dealey Plaza. But would I say that I was at the scene of the assassination. No, I was in the same location where the assassination occured, but a "scene" is an action that includes when it happened.

If she wasn't there when the murder occured, then I wouldn't place her "at the scene of the crime." And that is irrespective of the question of whether she was ever even in the room.

But she cleaned up all her DNA from the room (and left Guede's behind....)
There may be some confusion based on the terminology and the need to consider the usual legal definition.

I believe "crime scene" and "scene of the crime" are synonymous.

Here's are some legal definitions of "crime scene":

Quote:
Crime scene refers to a location where an illegal act took place. The term also refers to an area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by trained law enforcement personnel, crime scene investigators (CSIs) or in rare circumstances, forensic scientists. A crime scene need not be an area where the offence was committed
.

Source: https://definitions.uslegal.com/c/crime-scene/

Quote:
A crime scene is any physical scene, anywhere, that may provide potential evidence to an investigator. It may include a person’s body, any type of building, vehicles, places in the open air or objects found at those locations. “Crime scene examination” therefore refers to an examination where forensic or scientific techniques are used to preserve and gather physical evidence of a crime.
Source: https://www.unodc.org/documents/huma...6_tool_5-9.pdf

Some sources differentiate between a "primary" crime scene (a place where the crime occurred and there may be forensic evidence for collection or examination) and a "secondary" crime scene (a place different from the primary crime scene but where there may be some forensic evidence related to the crime that was committed at the primary crime scene). For example, the primary crime scene is the room where Guede sexually assaulted and murdered Kercher; secondary crime scenes would include the garden of the Biscarini residence (where Guede disposed of Kercher's cell phones) and Guede's flat (where police found a shoe box which had contained a brand of shoes the soles of which would have left a pattern identical to that found on a pillow in the murder room).

Persons can be at a crime scene even at the time of the crime and be neither the criminal nor a direct victim; for example, at Dealey Plaza on 22 November 1963. Similarly, someone can enter a crime scene - the place where a crime has been committed - after a crime has been committed at that place without being either the criminal or a victim of that crime. And, of course, before any crime has occurred, people can be innocently at the location of the future crime scene.

As is well known, police and the forensic investigators seal off crime scene locations in the course of their investigations from the moment they enter the location until it is forensically safe to allow access to others. However, in the Kercher case, the police were ineffective in sealing off the crime scene: they let in one of the residents (not Knox) to retrieve her computer, and apparently prior to all the forensic evidence was gathered, the cottage flat seal was broken. Furthermore, the potential evidence within the flat was handled in a disorganized and incompetent manner by the police, so that, for instance, the part of the bra with hooks and eyes was neither collected at the same time as the other evidence (42 days had passed) nor in its original position.

Last edited by Numbers; 5th December 2021 at 06:21 PM.
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Old 5th December 2021, 06:45 PM   #2048
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Not only the bra clasp was left behind, but the crack forensic police tossed the bloody jacket she was wearing when murdered into her dirty cloths hamper! These so-called experts need some serious training!
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Old 6th December 2021, 12:19 AM   #2049
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Originally Posted by Vixen View Post
Oh dear.

Has it dawned on you she thought it a great idea to point the finger at someone else, as criminals are wont to do? However, the pair were too dumb to realise that faeces contain little DNA, thanks to bacteria breakdown.
Vixen every time you try and get technical you get things wrong, probably because you jump to assumptions.

No, the problem with faeces is it contains lots of DNA. DNA from food and lots of DNA from bacteria. All this foreign DNA can make testing for the small proportion that is human DNA difficult.
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Old 6th December 2021, 12:39 AM   #2050
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Originally Posted by pgwenthold View Post

Is it true that they told her she had tested positive for HIV to get her to expose her sexual history?
Yes, although later in prison.

HIV testing was compulsory for prisoners in Italian prisons. She was initially told she had tested positive for HIV and needed to write down all her sexual contacts. Somehow this was leaked to the press. Having done so, it the turned out the HIV test was a false positive.

False positive HIV tests are rare, and would usually involve a case review, because the most likely cause is a mislabelled sample, meaning you have someone else who is positive but has been given a negative result. In addition you would not usually accept just a second sample as negative but usually want duplicate negatives.

Almost certainly this was a trick by someone to obtain that sexual history. None of the process around the result sounds like they genuinely thought this was a positive tests or acted as if they had actually received a positive result.
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Old 6th December 2021, 01:02 AM   #2051
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According to this link, HIV testing in Italian prisons must have the consent of the prisoner:
https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.c...879-015-1301-5

Prisoners are not routinely tested for HIV in Italy.



She does write this in her book:

Maybe he was trying to comfort me or to make a joke, or maybe he saw an opening he thought he could use to his advantage. Whatever the reason, as we were walking back upstairs to my cell, Argirò said, “Don’t worry. I’d still have sex with you right now. Promise me you’ll have sex with me.”

I doubt Argirò would have said that if he seriously thought she had HIV.
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Old 6th December 2021, 10:14 AM   #2052
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Yes, although later in prison.

HIV testing was compulsory for prisoners in Italian prisons. She was initially told she had tested positive for HIV and needed to write down all her sexual contacts. Somehow this was leaked to the press. Having done so, it the turned out the HIV test was a false positive.

False positive HIV tests are rare, and would usually involve a case review, because the most likely cause is a mislabelled sample, meaning you have someone else who is positive but has been given a negative result. In addition you would not usually accept just a second sample as negative but usually want duplicate negatives.

Almost certainly this was a trick by someone to obtain that sexual history. None of the process around the result sounds like they genuinely thought this was a positive tests or acted as if they had actually received a positive result.
Originally Posted by Stacyhs View Post
According to this link, HIV testing in Italian prisons must have the consent of the prisoner:
https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.c...879-015-1301-5

Prisoners are not routinely tested for HIV in Italy.



She does write this in her book:

Maybe he was trying to comfort me or to make a joke, or maybe he saw an opening he thought he could use to his advantage. Whatever the reason, as we were walking back upstairs to my cell, Argirò said, “Don’t worry. I’d still have sex with you right now. Promise me you’ll have sex with me.”

I doubt Argirò would have said that if he seriously thought she had HIV.
From the 2015 article found by Stacyhs*:

Quote:
In Italy measures promoting HIV prevention and control are listed among the health objectives that must be guaranteed to the prison population. HIV tests cannot take place without the consent of the person concerned and may be recommended but not imposed on inmates who display high risk behaviors.
Planigale, do you have a source for the statement that HIV testing is or was compulsory in Italian prisons?

* Source: https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.c...879-015-1301-5
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Old 6th December 2021, 07:56 PM   #2053
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Originally Posted by Numbers View Post
From the 2015 article found by Stacyhs*:



Planigale, do you have a source for the statement that HIV testing is or was compulsory in Italian prisons?

* Source: https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.c...879-015-1301-5
There are provisions of Italian procedural law (current in 2014) that make it incumbent on the authorities to provide therapy for detained person who is suffering from overt AIDS or severe immunodeficiency disease to be diagnosed or treated.

However, there does not seem to be any provision requiring the authorities to test each detained person. There does not appear any provision, in the Italian procedural laws I have examined, for an accused to be tested for AIDS or immunodeficiency without that person's knowledge or consent. However, there may be such provisions elsewhere.

According to the Italian Code of Criminal Procedure (current as of 2014), CCP Article 275, paragraph 4-bis:

Quote:
Precautionary detention in prison shall not be ordered or maintained if the accused suffers from overt AIDS or severe immunodeficiency, or from any other severe disease which makes his health conditions incompatible with detention or which hampers adequate treatment within the prison environment.
Paragraph 4-ter of CPP Article 275 provides that for an accused meeting the provisions of paragraph 4-bis, if house detention is not adequate, detention in a specialized health care facility may be ordered by the judge.

According to CPP Article 286-bis, paragraph 2:

Quote:
The Ministry of Health, in agreement with the Ministry of Justice, shall establish standards for the diagnostic and medical forensic procedures to be followed to be used to ascertain cases of overt AIDS or severe immunodeficiency.
Paragraph 3 of CPP Article 286-bis states:

Quote:
If diagnostic tests are to be performed to ascertain the existence of the health conditions referred to in Article 275, paragraph 4-bis, or the accused who suffers from such conditions requires therapeutic care and neither diagnosis nor therapy may be provided in prison, the judge may order temporary hospitalization in a suitable national health facility....
Source: The quotes are adapted from The Italian Code of Criminal Procedure: Critical essays and English translation, edited by M. Gialuz, L. Luparia, and F. Scarpa; Wolters Kluwer Italia (C) 2014.

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Old Yesterday, 12:03 AM   #2054
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In other words, Amanda was tested for HIV...or so the doctor claimed...for no reason as she was not high risk or showing symptoms. As she wrote in WTBH:

"In the end, I don’t know if they made up the HIV diagnosis. It wasn’t the doctor who said I should think about whom I’d had sex with, but Argirò. It might have been that the test was faulty, or Argirò could have put the medical staff up to it so he could ask me questions and pass the answers along to the police."
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Old Yesterday, 01:24 AM   #2055
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Originally Posted by Numbers View Post
From the 2015 article found by Stacyhs*:



Planigale, do you have a source for the statement that HIV testing is or was compulsory in Italian prisons?

* Source: https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.c...879-015-1301-5
There was a policy of universal testing for blood borne viruses at the time. So it was not compulsory in terms of a prisoner being held down and having blood taken against their will. But my guess is the consent was pretty rudimentary and not given in a way to make it easy to refuse, my memory is that if untested prisoners were held in isolation (or at least warned that would be the consequence).
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Old Yesterday, 07:55 AM   #2056
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
There was a policy of universal testing for blood borne viruses at the time. So it was not compulsory in terms of a prisoner being held down and having blood taken against their will. But my guess is the consent was pretty rudimentary and not given in a way to make it easy to refuse, my memory is that if untested prisoners were held in isolation (or at least warned that would be the consequence).
Is there documentary evidence of this being the case as of the relevant period (November, 2007 and later)?

Of interest, CPP Article 286-bis had a first paragraph that was repealed by the Italian Parliament by a law passed in July, 1999. (This obsolete paragraph is omitted in the English translation provided in the w014 text edited by Gialuz et al.)

This paragraph 1, repealed more than 8 years before Knox's detention had begun, had the following text (Google translation with my help):

Quote:
1. Pre-trial detention in prison [of] those affected by HIV infection [results in] a situation of incompatibility with the state of detention [and] cannot be maintained. Incompatibility exists, and is declared by the judge, in cases of overt AIDS or severe immune deficiency; in other cases, the incompatibility due to HIV infection is assessed by the judge taking into account the residual period of pre-trial detention and the effects that his current physical conditions have on the danger of the prisoner. The request to ascertain the state of incompatibility can be made by the accused, by his lawyer or by the penitentiary health service. In cases of incompatibility, the judge orders the revocation of the precautionary measure, or house arrest at the home of the accused.
Source: https://www.altalex.com/documents/le...lari-personali

It appears to me based on the available evidence that (at least some) Italian prisons as of 2007 had the capability of doing blood draws for AIDS tests, but were not required under 2007 Italian law to have such tests conducted on a routine basis. I suggest, but cannot prove with available public information, that Knox was selected by the Italian authorities as a detainee who received what was either a real or hoax AIDS test. A question remains as to the ultimate purpose of that real or hoax AIDS test, and of the information conveyed to Knox, according to her, that she apparently tested positive for AIDS. Certainly the Italian authorities abused the information that she had recorded in her journal (which the authorities seized), following Knox being falsely told that she had AIDS, in an effort to defame her.

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Old Yesterday, 11:56 AM   #2057
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Did they tell Knox they were taking blood for an HIV test? Presumably, she consented to it then.

Now, they may have told her they were required to, which may or may not be true and the deception may or may not have been intentional.

ETA: I heard part of her interview last night, and again, her story is their big thing in the interrogation was "Remember"

She also claims she immediately had a written statement recanting her accusation of her boss (when she was coherent she says)
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Old Yesterday, 12:23 PM   #2058
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In WTBH, Knox writes:

Quote:
He looked down at the folder in front of him and up at me. “Name?” he asked. “Amanda Knox. K-n-o-x.” “Do you have allergies, illnesses, diseases?” “No,” I replied. “Well, we’ll need to do blood work anyway,” he said. Just then I felt a sharp pinch from the back of my head. The nurse had snuck around me and plucked a hair from my scalp. I started to turn and glare at her, but instead asked the doctor, “Blood work? For what?” “For diseases,” he said. “Sign this. For the tests.” He pushed a document and a pen in front of me, and I signed it. “How do you feel?” “Worried,” I said. “Worried and confused.”
From this we can infer that she signed papers for blood work but did not know it included specifically for HIV/AIDS testing.
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Old Today, 06:35 AM   #2059
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We know that there is an obvious delay in the resolution of the legal aspects of the calunnia. What could be the delay? It appeared to me that it was a routine matter of Italy as the respondent state liaising with the ECHR committee of ministers to annul the calunnia charge. With the severity of the violations that "undermined" and "compromised the fairness of the proceedings as a whole", how can it be anything else? I've posted these before but they are a worthwhile reference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UybuIA5rSo&t=151s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCHo...ex=718&t=3894s

In the second video at approx the hour mark, Amanda says that "It's something that I am still attempting to fight, but it costs a lot of money to be going through the court system, so it's not something that is easily acceptable to me."

Why does she still need to fight at all? It should be a done deal with Italy communicating with the committee of ministers, who would in turn contact Amanda's lawyer to see if the action plan was acceptable to Amanda or not. Just speculating, but it would be hard for Italy to annul the calunnia without the subject of compensation for 3 years wrongful imprisonment arising? That's the only reason I can think of that would justify the delay. If Amanda is "going through the court system" it implies that proceedings have gone beyond a simple action plan.

Did Amanda get compensated for the 1 year illegal imprisonment as a result of the murder charge? If she didn't then it could be a further ramification if compensation for 3 years wrongful imprisonment for the calunnia is valid.

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Old Today, 09:10 AM   #2060
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Originally Posted by TomG View Post
We know that there is an obvious delay in the resolution of the legal aspects of the calunnia. What could be the delay? It appeared to me that it was a routine matter of Italy as the respondent state liaising with the ECHR committee of ministers to annul the calunnia charge. With the severity of the violations that "undermined" and "compromised the fairness of the proceedings as a whole", how can it be anything else? I've posted these before but they are a worthwhile reference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UybuIA5rSo&t=151s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCHo...ex=718&t=3894s

In the second video at approx the hour mark, Amanda says that "It's something that I am still attempting to fight, but it costs a lot of money to be going through the court system, so it's not something that is easily acceptable to me."

Why does she still need to fight at all? It should be a done deal with Italy communicating with the committee of ministers, who would in turn contact Amanda's lawyer to see if the action plan was acceptable to Amanda or not. Just speculating, but it would be hard for Italy to annul the calunnia without the subject of compensation for 3 years wrongful imprisonment arising? That's the only reason I can think of that would justify the delay. If Amanda is "going through the court system" it implies that proceedings have gone beyond a simple action plan.

Did Amanda get compensated for the 1 year illegal imprisonment as a result of the murder charge? If she didn't then it could be a further ramification if compensation for 3 years wrongful imprisonment for the calunnia is valid.

Hoots
Knox v. Italy is, as of 8 December 2021, is one of the 16 leading final-judgment ECHR cases against Italy before the Council of Europe's Committee of Ministers (CoM) that are awaiting an Action Plan (or Action Report).

There was a preliminary communication from Italy to the CoM acknowledging the ECHR judgment of 24 January 2019 (final 24 June 2019) on 10 January 2020. Italy has paid the just satisfaction, as published by the CoM on 3 January 2020.

Italy is slow in responding with Action Plans (or Reports) to the final ECHR judgments against it. The oldest leading pending case awaiting an Action Plan or Report is De Tommaso v. Italy 43395/09, with final ECHR judgment 23 February 2017.

I suspect that Knox and her lawyers may be waiting for Italy to produce an acceptable Action Plan before they start any legal proceedings for a revision judgment. There is no time limit under Italian law for a wrongfully convicted person to file a request for revision with an appeal court. However, if such a request were to be finally rejected by the Italian Supreme Court of Cassation, the only recourse would likely be to lodge a second application to the ECHR on that judgment. That path would certainly be lengthy. It may be a better legal approach to await acknowledgment of the revision path from Italy in an Action Plan acceptable to the CoM.

Sources:

https://hudoc.exec.coe.int/eng?i=004-52517

https://hudoc.exec.coe.int/eng?i=004-46307

https://hudoc.exec.coe.int/eng#{%22EXECDocumentTypeCollection%22:[%22CEC%22],%22EXECLanguage%22:[%22ENG%22],%22EXECState%22:[%22ITA%22],%22EXECIsClosed%22:[%22False%22],%22EXECType%22:[%22L%22],%22EXECAPStatus%22:[%221%22]}
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Old Today, 10:37 AM   #2061
Bill Williams
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Originally Posted by Numbers View Post
I suspect that Knox and her lawyers may be waiting for Italy to produce an acceptable Action Plan before they start any legal proceedings for a revision judgment. There is no time limit under Italian law for a wrongfully convicted person to file a request for revision with an appeal court. However, if such a request were to be finally rejected by the Italian Supreme Court of Cassation, the only recourse would likely be to lodge a second application to the ECHR on that judgment. That path would certainly be lengthy. It may be a better legal approach to await acknowledgment of the revision path from Italy in an Action Plan acceptable to the CoM.
The most frequent 'drive-by' post to this thread is, "Is this thread still going?"

Until Italy complies with the ECHR directive, this thread has utility.

There's also the thing of people like Vixen who pass on Mignini's view of the 2015 exoneration, almost word for word. How much the ISC acted back then illegally, yada yada yada. Like a losing football team who blame the refs for the loss.

As long as Mignini won't let it go, neither will Vixen. Or Peter Q.
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Old Today, 07:27 PM   #2062
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Originally Posted by TomG View Post

Did Amanda get compensated for the 1 year illegal imprisonment as a result of the murder charge? If she didn't then it could be a further ramification if compensation for 3 years wrongful imprisonment for the calunnia is valid.

Hoots
Amanda never filed for compensation. I think she's well aware that they'd refuse it just like they did for Raffaele using the same excuse. After all, she just accused Lumumba of her own free will and needed to unburden herself to Mignini who was just sitting there acting as a notary, asking no questions. That and the amount of chamomile tea and cakes she was offered induced her to lie.
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Old Today, 09:35 PM   #2063
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Originally Posted by Stacyhs View Post
Amanda never filed for compensation. I think she's well aware that they'd refuse it just like they did for Raffaele using the same excuse. After all, she just accused Lumumba of her own free will and needed to unburden herself to Mignini who was just sitting there acting as a notary, asking no questions. That and the amount of chamomile tea and cakes she was offered induced her to lie.
John Follain's book, "A Death in Italy", is one of the main sources of that factoid. When I first read that section it was hard to believe that Follain dealt with it - the interrogation - so briefly. My view is that by the time Mignini filled Follain in on the events of the night of the interrogation, Mignini was in a mood to minimize its import.

The reason, in my view, was obvious. The interrogation had arrested the wrong people - particularly Lumumba. Acc. to Follain, Mignini thought of Knox as a liar, then two pages later says that Mignini had to arrest Lumumba, because "Knox had accused him."

So it is the interrogation is almost an afterthought in Follain's book. Anna Donnino is not even mentioned. Either as a translator or as she had described herself - as a 'mediator'.

But Follain does mention that Knox got biscuits and chamomile tea. Maybe it was just me, but I thought Follain was trying to get the reader to think that Knox had accused Lumumba simply to stop all that kind behaviour on Mignini's, Ficara's part. Knox did not want to crash the cookie budget at the Questura.

It was the main problem with Follain's book. It had as it's sole source the police, Mignini, and the British girls. Follain didn't even try for balance - in the sense that the only time he quoted from Knox was from leaked tapes of surreptitious recordings of prison visits, that sort of thing.
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