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Old 16th September 2020, 04:44 PM   #121
MMarco
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Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Who is conducting this investigation?
I am trying to.
Coming here to check is also part of this investigation.
If you want to help, without edgy and trolling behavior, you are mostly welcome to join.

Originally Posted by Skeptical Greg View Post
You apparently are working with a different definition of " apparently " than I am..
I am, apparently..
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Old 16th September 2020, 04:45 PM   #122
Matthew Ellard
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
You have written (seee above) about my claim and you clearly referred to me supposedly claiming that Ven. Sayadaw flawlessly recited the whole Tipitaka in front of a public, but I was just quoting and investigating this claim,
So you withdraw your claim, that this is amazing because you can't even reserch and define what books you claim he remembered?

Try a Buddhist forum.
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Old 16th September 2020, 04:47 PM   #123
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
This page does not appear to be a verified Guiness World Record. It's an apocryphal account of a recitation of 16,000 words. So, verified or not, it's not even the claim you're discussing.

I haven't seen any evidence so far that shows that Guiness verified a record for reciting the Tripitaka verbatim.
And here we go again..

I am not claiming I know of someone have independently verified the claim.
I know the GWR quoted the feat.
So I naively assumed that the GWR being a well-renowned entity, may have verified or knew about people who have verified the claim.
This is part of the "investigation" we have been discussing.
I have already stated this already more than once.
Please go back to my previous comments so that I don' t have to repeat myself over and over.
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Old 16th September 2020, 04:48 PM   #124
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Quote:
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.
Actually, good, verifiable evidence is sufficient.
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Old 16th September 2020, 04:49 PM   #125
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
So you withdraw your claim, that this is amazing because you can't even reserch and define what books you claim he remembered?

Try a Buddhist forum.
You can' t read English or I can' t write in English.
It is either one or the other.
Or both.
In any of the two cases, discussion between us is useless.
On this we may agree.
So no need to discuss any further.
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Old 16th September 2020, 04:58 PM   #126
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I am trying to.
Coming here to check is also part of this investigation.
If you want to help, without edgy and trolling behavior, you are mostly welcome to join.
Well, going back to your op:

Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Hi all,
recently I stumbled upon an article about a Myanmar monk called Mingun Sayadaw, a Myanmar monk who in 1954 has been able to (apparently) flawless recall and recite all the content from the 16000 pages of the Tipitaka in front of other people. This is over 2 million words.
Just Google "Mingun Sayadaw Book of World Records"
The feat has been listed in at least two editions of the Guinness of World Records.
I know about people with exceptional memory abilities but I am wondering whether this is not beyond what an human mind can be able to do so I am wondering if there is anybody out there who knows more than me about the subject.
There appears to be considerable additional knowledge provided to you in this thread. In much more detail than a rather vague entry in the Guinness Book of World Records. You seem quite resistant the the knowledge that has been imparted, even though it it what you asked for. Your posts indicate a conclusion in search of justification rather than a search for additional knowledge.

When it comes to the extraordinary claims by and of Buddhist monks, you may wish to become familiar, if you are not already, of the claims of one Tuesday Lobsang Rampa.
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:01 PM   #127
Matthew Ellard
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I am trying to.Coming here to check is also part of this investigation.
Have you actually contacted the Burmese Buddhist Council to ask them what exact books, what exact versions, you think were memorised
....or are you a bit lazy and not that interested in your own claim?
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:05 PM   #128
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
So I naively assumed that the GWR being a well-renowned entity, may have verified or knew about people who have verified the claim.
Nice try. The Guinness Book of Records commenced publishing after 1954.
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:07 PM   #129
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
Nice try. The Guinness Book of Records commenced publishing after 1954.
The investigation is ongoing. Conclusions may, or may not, be forthcoming.
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:13 PM   #130
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
And here we go again..

I am not claiming I know of someone have independently verified the claim.
I know the GWR quoted the feat.
So I naively assumed that the GWR being a well-renowned entity, may have verified or knew about people who have verified the claim.
This is part of the "investigation" we have been discussing.
I have already stated this already more than once.
Please go back to my previous comments so that I don' t have to repeat myself over and over.
It's not even the same claim.

But okay, good. So now we know that Guinness doesn't provide verification of the claim, not in that particular text, anyway. And there doesn't seem to be any other good verification out there.

What's next in your investigation?
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:14 PM   #131
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Originally Posted by Steve View Post
The investigation is ongoing. Conclusions may, or may not, be forthcoming.
Top. Men.
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Old 16th September 2020, 05:14 PM   #132
Matthew Ellard
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
You can' t read English or I can' t write in English.
Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
This is over 2 million words.
Which collection of books and which versions have more than 2 million words?

Show us your research?
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Old 16th September 2020, 06:24 PM   #133
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I really like secular Buddhism and find it to be a fine philosophy for life. The religious stuff, I can do without.
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:10 PM   #134
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Some more information here on the actual tests taken:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monastic_examinations

"The breadth of the examinations requires candidates to recite over 2.4 million words with correct pronunciation and smooth flow, and transcribe over 200 texts from memory.[10] The examinations also require candidates to display their mastery of "doctrinal understanding, textual discrimination, taxonomic grouping and comparative philosophy of Buddhist doctrine."[9]

The first candidate to pass the grueling examinations was Mingun Sayadaw in 1954.[11] His error-free performance across 16,000 pages, was rewarded by the Burmese government with the title "Mahātipiṭakadharatipiṭakakovida" (lit. "great bearer of the spoken and written Tipiṭaka).[12][11][6] As of 2020, only 15 monks have passed both the oral and written components, who are recognized by the Burmese government as "Sāsana Azani" (from Pali Sāsanājāneyya, lit. "Noble Hero of the Buddhist doctrine").[6][13][14] Successful candidates are bestowed ranking titles, flagstaffs, and white silken kanekgadan umbrellas (ကနက္ကဒဏ်ထီးဖြူတော်) depending on their relative performance.[15]"

It seems the guy isn't unique as at least 14 other monks have achieved the same feat.

Regarding the length of the testing:

"It is the longest examination in the world and the entire examination is spread over five years.

In the first and second year, the candidates are examined in Vinaya Pitaka (2260 Pages) lasting a total of 20 days.( 3 days each for 5 volumes plus 5 days for the written part covering the Commentaries and Sub-commentaries.

In the third year the candidates are examined in 3 volumes of the Sutta Pitaka (779 pages ). In the fourth and the fifth years, the examination on the first five (1390 pages) and the last two (3597 pages) of seven volumes of the Abhidhamma Pitaka is arranged. The total length of the examination used to be four years before."

http://www.myanmarnet.net/nibbana/tipitaka/tpdkdhra.htm

Last edited by RolandRat; 16th September 2020 at 07:13 PM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:35 PM   #135
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
It's not even the same claim.
I would say we are speaking about the same monk. So same claim.

Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
But okay, good. So now we know that Guinness doesn't provide verification of the claim, not in that particular text, anyway.
No, we don' t know this

Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
What's next in your investigation?
Not much that seems to trigger your interest, so why bother talking?

Last edited by MMarco; 16th September 2020 at 07:36 PM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:40 PM   #136
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Originally Posted by Steve View Post
There appears to be considerable additional knowledge provided to you in this thread. In much more detail than a rather vague entry in the Guinness Book of World Records. You seem quite resistant the the knowledge that has been imparted, even though it it what you asked for. Your posts indicate a conclusion in search of justification rather than a search for additional knowledge.
If this is what it seems to you, then fine.
I beg to disagree with your assessment, though.
The opinion that I have is that there are many people here who just like to troll, something which is not illegal but I have really no time for that.

Originally Posted by Steve View Post
When it comes to the extraordinary claims by and of Buddhist monks, you may wish to become familiar, if you are not already, of the claims of one Tuesday Lobsang Rampa.
Please provide for this claim the same amount of evidence I have provided for Ven. Mingun Sayadaw, then maybe open a similar thread for this as well and I may peek into it.
If I have time.
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:54 PM   #137
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Originally Posted by RolandRat View Post
Some more information here on the actual tests taken:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monastic_examinations

"The breadth of the examinations requires candidates to recite over 2.4 million words with correct pronunciation and smooth flow, and transcribe over 200 texts from memory.[10] The examinations also require candidates to display their mastery of "doctrinal understanding, textual discrimination, taxonomic grouping and comparative philosophy of Buddhist doctrine."[9]

The first candidate to pass the grueling examinations was Mingun Sayadaw in 1954.[11] His error-free performance across 16,000 pages, was rewarded by the Burmese government with the title "Mahātipiṭakadharatipiṭakakovida" (lit. "great bearer of the spoken and written Tipiṭaka).[12][11][6] As of 2020, only 15 monks have passed both the oral and written components, who are recognized by the Burmese government as "Sāsana Azani" (from Pali Sāsanājāneyya, lit. "Noble Hero of the Buddhist doctrine").[6][13][14] Successful candidates are bestowed ranking titles, flagstaffs, and white silken kanekgadan umbrellas (ကနက္ကဒဏ်ထီးဖြူတော်) depending on their relative performance.[15]"

It seems the guy isn't unique as at least 14 other monks have achieved the same feat.

Regarding the length of the testing:

"It is the longest examination in the world and the entire examination is spread over five years.

In the first and second year, the candidates are examined in Vinaya Pitaka (2260 Pages) lasting a total of 20 days.( 3 days each for 5 volumes plus 5 days for the written part covering the Commentaries and Sub-commentaries.

In the third year the candidates are examined in 3 volumes of the Sutta Pitaka (779 pages ). In the fourth and the fifth years, the examination on the first five (1390 pages) and the last two (3597 pages) of seven volumes of the Abhidhamma Pitaka is arranged. The total length of the examination used to be four years before."

http://www.myanmarnet.net/nibbana/tipitaka/tpdkdhra.htm
Finally, someone who is interested to discuss the topic at hand, rather than attacking me.
I am happy.

As I have written before, there are several level of examinations most of them will require monks to remember just a very minor part of the Tipitaka or other texts, it seems.
Thousands of monks have passed the lowest steps but only a few have passed the highest one.
Only the highest step, which is called "Tipitakadhara", requires monk to be randomly checked on the whole content of the Tipitaka at random and to be able to flawlessy repeat each sentence as requested without errors.
Now, since the whole Tipitaka is a corpus of books 16000 pages long I doubtred that this feat was humanly possible and never heard of any other human who could remember anything close to that.
(If someone here has evidence of the contrary please post it here, otherwise please stay silent.
No, remembering your favourite song lyrics is not remotely as close to that

Now it seems that things are quite different as written in some sites, that is :
1) even the very few monks that have passed the Tipitakadhara exam have not been tested on the whole Tipitaka at once, but in steps. That is, one of five parts or so at time in different years and
2) they were allowed not remembering well some parts here and there and allowed to be prompted up to five times in a day, apparently.
So, assuming the five parts to be equal in size, this would mean to be able to remember about 3200 pages at a time and be allowed not to remember immediately some parts and to be allowed to be prompted by another monk in order to do so.
Still a great feat, but closer to the realm of what I would consider humanly possible.
Now I am still investigating whether monks have been able to flawlessly repeat word by word each and every requested parts of the text or if they have been allowed some "mistake" here and there (other than being prompted up to 5 times per day., if required).
If anyone here knows more than me please help.

As for the feat by Mingun Sayadaw, he was apparently being able to memorize all the content of the Tipitaka and be able to flawlessly recite parts of it under request.
This is what seems to be written in the GWR.
I would not consider this feat as humanly possible so I am investigating the topic further with the GWR.

This is where we are at the moment

Last edited by MMarco; 16th September 2020 at 09:44 PM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 08:41 PM   #138
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Originally Posted by RolandRat View Post
"It is the longest examination in the world and the entire examination is spread over five years.
Thank you. That ends NMarco's BS claim. The examination took place over five years and did not happen all at once in 1954.

We also now know the sutras are repetitive verse.

We also now know that the Guinness Book of Records didn't exist in 1954 and thus did not verify anything.

We also now know 14 other monks supposedly also achieved this and thus it isn't special.

Last edited by Matthew Ellard; 16th September 2020 at 08:44 PM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:42 PM   #139
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
Thank you. That ends NMarco's BS claim.
1) Me made no claim, at least, not the one you are referring to.
2) BS is not a respectful word.
3) I hope with your words you may end up the participation to the discussion.
4) My name is MMarco, not NMarco.

Last edited by MMarco; 16th September 2020 at 09:44 PM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:55 PM   #140
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I would not call it as a "creative process" as you would need to memorize word by word every part of a long text, something that it is difficult to do even for short text.
In elementary school I believe most of us hase remembered small pieces of poetry or prayers, but no one I know went father than remembering up to half page of written text.
And yet actors memorise their (often substantial) parts in long plays all the time, including one man shows which last all evening.

It's almost as if you can train to be able to do it.
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Old 16th September 2020, 10:44 PM   #141
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Originally Posted by Pixel42 View Post
And yet actors memorise their (often substantial) parts in long plays all the time, including one man shows which last all evening.

It's almost as if you can train to be able to do it.
I appreciate you telling me me this.
Now, we would just need to check how long would be the longest text ever memorized by an actor on a performance, remembering that actors will still not be shunned if they mistake a word of no importance within the text.
Then, we will compare the length of this text to the text memorized allegedly by Mingun Sayadaw.
If you have further info, please share

I have found some content here: https://forum.artofmemory.com/t/worl...g-text/32702/6
and here: https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-lo...been-memorized.

Still no evidence of someone being able to memorize anything closer to the whole Tipitaka.

So..
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Old 16th September 2020, 11:49 PM   #142
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Still no evidence of someone being able to memorize anything closer to the whole Tipitaka.

So..
Personally, I think you're getting a bit hung up on the length of the text. Don't forget this guy did it over years.

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com...-minute-binary

"The longest binary number sequence memorized in one minute is 270 and was achieved by Aravind Pasupathy (India) at the Kasthuri Sreenivasan Trust in Coimbatore, India, on 3 April 2015.

Aravind's interest memory techniques arose when investigating ways to make his language classes more engaging for his students."

Whilst the amount of numbers in the above is much much less, he memorised them in 1 minute.

Memory feats, whilst impressive, are not out of the ordinary.

Plus I did link further back about a girl who memorised the entire Harry Potter books, approx 1 million words. You seem to keep ignoring this.
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Old 17th September 2020, 12:13 AM   #143
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I doubt any actor could tell you the total number of words they have ever memorised. Why would they count them? But a busy repertory actor would obviously memorise a huge number over the course of their career. 2 million words over a 50 year career would be 40,000 words a year. The larger roles in Shakespeare's plays appear to contain between 10 and 15 thousand words.
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Old 17th September 2020, 03:29 AM   #144
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
If this is what it seems to you, then fine.
I beg to disagree with your assessment, though.
The opinion that I have is that there are many people here who just like to troll, something which is not illegal but I have really no time for that.
And the rest? Has no poster here provided information that you did not previously have?


Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Please provide for this claim the same amount of evidence I have provided for Ven. Mingun Sayadaw, then maybe open a similar thread for this as well and I may peek into it.
If I have time.
I fail to see a claim in my post. Can you identify one?

Why do you insist that my position is that Sayadaw did not perform the claimed memory feat. I have no problem accepting that possibility. Although the research done by other posters seem to be that he did not do it all in one go as you have implied. It seems from the info provided by other posters here that similar memory abilities have been demonstrated by other individuals. It seems to be well within the abilities of human brains. Remarkable but in no way mysterious.

Remember your op? "I am wondering whether this is not beyond what an human mind can be able to do so". The answer is no, it is not, provided it is done as described in RolandRat's post 134.
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Old 17th September 2020, 03:54 AM   #145
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@MMarco
Quote:
I doubted that this feat was humanly possible
You keep repeating this.

If you doubted that it was humanly possible, then you must have doubted that your monk actually did this.

Or, are you suggesting the monk is not human?
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Old 17th September 2020, 04:10 AM   #146
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Hi all,
recently I stumbled upon an article about a Myanmar monk called Mingun Sayadaw, a Myanmar monk who in 1954 has been able to (apparently) flawless recall and recite all the content from the 16000 pages of the Tipitaka in front of other people. This is over 2 million words.
Just Google "Mingun Sayadaw Book of World Records"
The feat has been listed in at least two editions of the Guinness of World Records.
I know about people with exceptional memory abilities but I am wondering whether this is not beyond what an human mind can be able to do so I am wondering if there is anybody out there who knows more than me about the subject.
Originally Posted by Skeptical Greg View Post
@MMarco


You keep repeating this.

If you doubted that it was humanly possible, then you must have doubted that your monk actually did this.

Or, are you suggesting the monk is not human?
My reading of MMarco's posts is that the monk performed the described memory feat therefore there is some "supernatural" aspect to it. But it really has been difficult to pin MMarco down to an exact position. Uses too many if's, apparently's, and seem's to be able to be pinned down.
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Old 17th September 2020, 04:20 AM   #147
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Yes, I queried him on his definition of " apparently "...

He seems to think it means, " I think, maybe .. "..
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Old 17th September 2020, 07:06 AM   #148
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I would say we are speaking about the same monk. So same claim.
It's not the same claim, though. The claim you're investigating is the recitation of over a million words. The claim the Guiness book references is the recitation of 16,000 words.

My apologies. It was 16,000 pages, not words. I will agree we are talking about the same claim. I'm sorry.

Quote:
No, we don' t know this
Null hypothesis. You assume Guiness has verified the claim, in order to support the argument that the claim is true. But you can present no evidence of such verification. The closest you've come is a 1984 edition of the book mentioning a claim from 1974. They give no sources, no corroboration.

And it's still only 16,000 words.. My bad.

Quote:
Not much that seems to trigger your interest, so why bother talking?
Your investigation triggers my interest. I'm looking forward to the big reveal.

Last edited by theprestige; 17th September 2020 at 07:08 AM.
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Old 17th September 2020, 07:13 AM   #149
theprestige
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Originally Posted by RolandRat View Post
Some more information here on the actual tests taken:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monastic_examinations

"The breadth of the examinations requires candidates to recite over 2.4 million words with correct pronunciation and smooth flow, and transcribe over 200 texts from memory.[10] The examinations also require candidates to display their mastery of "doctrinal understanding, textual discrimination, taxonomic grouping and comparative philosophy of Buddhist doctrine."[9]

The first candidate to pass the grueling examinations was Mingun Sayadaw in 1954.[11] His error-free performance across 16,000 pages, was rewarded by the Burmese government with the title "Mahātipiṭakadharatipiṭakakovida" (lit. "great bearer of the spoken and written Tipiṭaka).[12][11][6] As of 2020, only 15 monks have passed both the oral and written components, who are recognized by the Burmese government as "Sāsana Azani" (from Pali Sāsanājāneyya, lit. "Noble Hero of the Buddhist doctrine").[6][13][14] Successful candidates are bestowed ranking titles, flagstaffs, and white silken kanekgadan umbrellas (ကနက္ကဒဏ်ထီးဖြူတော်) depending on their relative performance.[15]"

It seems the guy isn't unique as at least 14 other monks have achieved the same feat.

Regarding the length of the testing:

"It is the longest examination in the world and the entire examination is spread over five years.

In the first and second year, the candidates are examined in Vinaya Pitaka (2260 Pages) lasting a total of 20 days.( 3 days each for 5 volumes plus 5 days for the written part covering the Commentaries and Sub-commentaries.

In the third year the candidates are examined in 3 volumes of the Sutta Pitaka (779 pages ). In the fourth and the fifth years, the examination on the first five (1390 pages) and the last two (3597 pages) of seven volumes of the Abhidhamma Pitaka is arranged. The total length of the examination used to be four years before."

http://www.myanmarnet.net/nibbana/tipitaka/tpdkdhra.htm
This seems more in line with an advanced degree. I wonder if you added up all the formulas, logic, and regulations involved in getting a Master's degree in Engineering and a license to practice the trade, would it total more than a million words' worth of stuff you had to get right, over a five year period? I bet it does. Or maybe not. Applied physics probably has a lot less repetition in the stanzas of its poetry. Engineering is going to be more efficient than religion, I think. But still.
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Old 17th September 2020, 07:19 AM   #150
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Please do bother next time.
After all, it is you who brought this topic up.
Then you missed my point. The point is that the human brain can store and recall more information than you understand. That learning things and being able to recall them is not a superhuman trait. It's something everyone can and has done. It's not special.

I did not set out to memorize every word to every song I listened to in my youth. It just happened. If I were trying, then, sure, I might be able to memorize various documents and recall them.

Also, what is the word count value to the melody of a song? I'm sure your lack of an answer to this question was an oversight and not an admission of a lack of an answer. If you want me to provide a count of the number of songs that I know, and the total word count as well, I want credit for knowing the overall tune as well.
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Old 17th September 2020, 11:34 AM   #151
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
This seems more in line with an advanced degree. I wonder if you added up all the formulas, logic, and regulations involved in getting a Master's degree in Engineering and a license to practice the trade, would it total more than a million words' worth of stuff you had to get right, over a five year period? I bet it does. Or maybe not. Applied physics probably has a lot less repetition in the stanzas of its poetry. Engineering is going to be more efficient than religion, I think. But still.
Yeah I'd agree. The more I read into this the more I think the claim that Mingun Sayadaw flawlessly recited the whole two million words in one go is a bit of a case of Chinese whispers. His test recital was flawless - His recital was flawless - He recited 2 million words flawlessly.

Every bit of information regarding the testing I can find states that only certain parts are tested at one time. The candidate knows which parts are being tested. Random sections of those parts are listed and the candidate needs to verbalise them.

On the more formal sites listing information regarding the testing and Mingun Sayadaw do not mention that he had recited the entire 2 million+ words in one sitting.

As an aside Guinness book of records, according to their own history, opened it's doors in November 1954 and first published in 1955.

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com...s/our-history/

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com...story/timeline

But despite a fair bit of searching, I cannot find anything regarding Sayadaw on their website.
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Old 17th September 2020, 12:11 PM   #152
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My understanding is that Guiness has generally been reputable about adjudicating the records they actually endorse. But nothing about their mention of the Sayadaw (turns out "sayadaw" is a religious title, not part of his name) indicates they were adjudicating a record attempt by him.
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Old 17th September 2020, 12:23 PM   #153
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
My understanding is that Guiness has generally been reputable about adjudicating the records they actually endorse. But nothing about their mention of the Sayadaw (turns out "sayadaw" is a religious title, not part of his name) indicates they were adjudicating a record attempt by him.
Well so it is. I love the small bits of new info a person can pick up here.
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Old 17th September 2020, 12:29 PM   #154
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Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Well so it is. I love the small bits of new info a person can pick up here.
I was confused because the Guiness reference Marco linked to uses a completely different name for the guy. In trying to figure out if it was even the same guy, I discovered the source of the confusion: We're using the title in this thread. Guiness referred to him by his given name.
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Old 17th September 2020, 02:11 PM   #155
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I was confused because the Guiness reference Marco linked to uses a completely different name for the guy. In trying to figure out if it was even the same guy, I discovered the source of the confusion: We're using the title in this thread. Guiness referred to him by his given name.
Did you manage to find anything about him on the Guinness site? I searched using his actual name and all variations of I could find but nothing appeared.
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Old 17th September 2020, 02:12 PM   #156
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Originally Posted by RolandRat View Post
Did you manage to find anything about him on the Guinness site? I searched using his actual name and all variations of I could find but nothing appeared.
I haven't gone that far, sorry.
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Old 17th September 2020, 02:23 PM   #157
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I haven't gone that far, sorry.
On these:

https://myanmars.net/wonders/mingun-...s-records.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mingun_Sayadaw

It states the record appeared in the 1985 addition. So 30 years after the fact. Perhaps this is the reason it no longer appears as was not actually verified by Guinness.

Some of the text on the first link is kinda funny:

"His dad kicked the bucket when Maung Khin was just 4 years of age. Amid his childhood. he was noted for being saved and his cleanliness.

The sayadaw kicked the bucket in 1992 of inconveniences from a disease. He was given an accepted state memorial service. where he was sent off by an extensive number of kindred friars. government authorities and lovers."

I'm guessing the translation into English somewhat failed ^^
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Old 17th September 2020, 03:13 PM   #158
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Old 17th September 2020, 03:31 PM   #159
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
My understanding is that Guiness has generally been reputable about adjudicating the records they actually endorse. But nothing about their mention of the Sayadaw (turns out "sayadaw" is a religious title, not part of his name) indicates they were adjudicating a record attempt by him.
I was part of a work team that successfully recorded a Guinness World Record as a PR stunt one time. They approved the framework, approved the verification, and sent someone to watch and validate the thing as it happened.
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Old 17th September 2020, 04:19 PM   #160
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Originally Posted by RolandRat View Post
It states the record appeared in the 1985 addition. So 30 years after the fact. Perhaps this is the reason it no longer appears as was not actually verified by Guinness.
The Guinness Book of Records didn't even exist in 1954, which is the year the Mingun Sayadaw completed his five year memory test. It did not verify anything.

More importantly the Burmese Buddhist Council was controlled by the communist military coup from the 60's and after this was promoting Burma's form of Buddhism. That's when this story was sent to the Guinness Book of Records.

It's simply propaganda.


MMarco can simply contact the Burmese Buddhist Council and ask them for information and evidence. The problem is Burmese Buddhists have been slaughtering Muslims in Burma (Rohingya) and trying to portray Buddhists as peaceful. I wonder if MMarco is working for the Burmese government.
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