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Old 1st November 2018, 05:04 PM   #161
theprestige
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Originally Posted by Tsukasa Buddha View Post
Do you think the US populace is uniquely stupid or that the Australians are uniquely intelligent?
Well that escalated quickly.

I think that Australians are uniquely... Australian. They're on the side of good, and none of their faults are intolerable.
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Old 1st November 2018, 05:04 PM   #162
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Here's some arguments for and against compulsory voting, courtesy of the Australian Electoral Commission.

https://www.aec.gov.au/Voting/Compulsory_Voting.htm
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Old 1st November 2018, 05:08 PM   #163
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Originally Posted by TomB View Post
It occurs to me that that one side effect of mandatory voting is that campaigns would be more about convincing voters to vote for a particular candidate and less about motivating voters to vote at all.

It presents electoral expectations from having a large effect. For example, people who felt they could skip voting because it was obvious Clinton was going to win would have voted. There also would not need to be voting drives to rally segments of the population to vote.

Also, voter suppression efforts would be less tenable when you are also requiring people to vote.


This, exactly this.
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Old 1st November 2018, 05:16 PM   #164
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Well that escalated quickly.

I think that Australians are uniquely... Australian. They're on the side of good, and none of their faults are intolerable.
Come on. No need to be overly defensive. It is an interesting probing question about your position.
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Old 1st November 2018, 05:47 PM   #165
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Well most of us do work on "If it aint broke, don't fix it'. The system of Parliamentary democracy that have is certainly not broke. Another Federal Government is 90% likely to be thrown out by next May. A State Government is more than likely to be retained later this month.

I personally do not believe that 5 - 10 minutes once every three years is much of a price to pay for what we have, and what we can do. It is not just voting. There is the Sausage sizzle and social events as well.

Vote early, don't have breakfast just grab a snag and coffee at the booth, and look at the second hand goods sale, then shop or go watch the kids play footy, cricket, tennis, soccer, swim etc, or take them to the park, or chat with friends and neighbors (usually about anything but politics - weather is a good topic, but footy not so much - it is likely to lead to bigger arguments than who should win the election), or just go home and chill. Work your day around the ballot, or vote in the previous couple of weeks at a pre-pollday station or by mail.

It can be said that this is an imposition. That's fine. That's what some people believe. I agree that it can be, but 5 - 10 minutes twice every five to six years is a pretty minor imposition and well worth the effort.

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Old 1st November 2018, 05:54 PM   #166
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Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post
Come on. No need to be overly defensive. It is an interesting probing question about your position.
It's a pants-on-head-retarded question, asked in bad faith and stacked with fallacies.

And I've just given you my position on Australians.
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:01 PM   #167
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
It's a pants-on-head-retarded question, asked in bad faith and stacked with fallacies.

And I've just given you my position on Australians.
It isnít.
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:06 PM   #168
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Voting for us is less imposition on your life than, say, attending your children's weekend sports, or their annual school play. Nobody is really forced to do this by means of fines or at the point of a gun. You do it because it's the right thing to do.
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:09 PM   #169
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Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post
It isnít.
Fascinating. Tell me more.
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:11 PM   #170
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Originally Posted by Norman Alexander View Post
Voting for us is less imposition on your life than, say, attending your children's weekend sports, or their annual school play. Nobody is really forced to do this by means of fines or at the point of a gun. You do it because it's the right thing to do.
So why the law and the fines and whatnot? I've asked this several times but nobody seems to want to answer it. If Australians are so into voting, why does it have to be compulsory?
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:17 PM   #171
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Fascinating. Tell me more.
I will probably later. Why donít you take a look again and see if you can see what I do?
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:45 PM   #172
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
So why the law and the fines and whatnot? I've asked this several times but nobody seems to want to answer it. If Australians are so into voting, why does it have to be compulsory?

There is no way of really telling how many people get their name ticked off to avoid a fine.


The nearest I can come to is the recent National Plebiscite on same sex marriage, run by the Electoral Commission which was not compulsory. Over 80% of eligible voters actually voted. Since about 90% vote in the compulsory federal Election, it is probably fair to say that 10% of people only vote because the have to. 10% never vote for whatever reason, and I could not find figures for how many are actually fined. Some, like you, just don't like it and are happy to cough up the nominal $20 in principle. Others, well who really knows? Nobody, as far as I know, has gone to jail over this.



So, most Australians do like to have a say in what happens in Australia. 80% voted when it was not compulsory. A lot of this is probably habit, or historical, but it is what it is. As I said earlier "if it aint broke, don't fix it", simply because it works for good or bad.

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Old 1st November 2018, 06:50 PM   #173
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Originally Posted by fromdownunder View Post
There is no way of really telling how many people get their name ticked off to avoid a fine.


The nearest I can come to is the recent National Plebiscite on same sex marriage, run by the Electoral Commission which was not compulsory. Over 80% of eligible voters actually voted. Since about 90% vote in the compulsory federal Election, it is probably fair to say that 10% of people only vote because the have to. 10% never vote for whatever reason, and I could not find figures for how many are actually fined. Some, like you, just don't like it and are happy to cough up the nominal $20 in principle. Others, well who really knows? Nobody, as far as I know, has gone to jail over this.



So, most Australians do like to have a say in what happens in Australia. 80% voted when it was not compulsory. A lot of this is probably habit, or historical, but it is what it is. As I said earlier "if it aint broke, don't fix it", simply because it works for good or bad.

Norm
Norm, why does voting in Australia have to be compulsory?
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Old 1st November 2018, 06:54 PM   #174
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Norm, why does voting in Australia have to be compulsory?

Because it works, and there are no compelling reasons to change it. It really is that simple.


Norm
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Old 1st November 2018, 07:14 PM   #175
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
So why the law and the fines and whatnot? I've asked this several times but nobody seems to want to answer it. If Australians are so into voting, why does it have to be compulsory?
Because once, before 1924, it wasn't compulsory but voluntary just like the USA. And the turnout was abysmal. We got stuck with governments selected only by those who could be arsed to vote, or who were actually able to turn up to vote.

This was considered not truly representational. Further, compulsory voting infrequently was not evaluated as a huge civic burden. So it was changed in 1924. The 1924 last voluntary voting election turnout was 59%. The 1927 compulsory voting election turnout was 91%.

https://www.aec.gov.au/Elections/Aus...ory/reform.htm

And there is a more detailed discussion of the for-and-against here: http://australianpolitics.com/voting/compulsory-voting
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Old 1st November 2018, 07:16 PM   #176
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
So why the law and the fines and whatnot? I've asked this several times but nobody seems to want to answer it. If Australians are so into voting, why does it have to be compulsory?
*eye roll*
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Old 1st November 2018, 07:21 PM   #177
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Interesting comment seen that compulsory voting in a secret ballot therefore does not mean that a vote is automatically valid. That is, if you turn up and vote by drawing a dick-and-balls on your ballot, when they tally at the end of the day nobody is going to know it is you who did it. So they can't identify and thus fine you for "not voting properly". Nor should they, in my opinion. Thus, in reality, the compulsion is for the action of voting, not for the casting of a valid ballot.

Or to put it more simply, if you gotta go vote, you may as well make yours count towards some politician you can tolerate for a while.
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Old 1st November 2018, 07:54 PM   #178
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
It's a pants-on-head-retarded question, asked in bad faith and stacked with fallacies.

And I've just given you my position on Australians.
I just love how you're posting this after reporting someone up-thread for warning you that your head might explode. Because that was totally a personal attack.

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Old 1st November 2018, 08:37 PM   #179
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Say I'm not all that interested in voting this year.
There's the cultural disconnect. You have the "luxury" (I guess you would consider it that) to say meh, I don't think I'll vote.

We, on the other hand, consider it a civic duty. When I was young and dumb I used to vote informally, but now that I'm older, I'm more mature, and I realise that voting is a duty and a privilege. Not everyone in all countries gets to vote. I participate in the political process because I want to. There's no way I'd ever, ever, consider not doing so, even if there were no law mandating that I do so. It's utterly unthinkable. Why would I do that?
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Old 1st November 2018, 08:46 PM   #180
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I bet Australians would lose their minds at the thought of having an election without the government threatening them.
You clearly have absolutely zero understanding of Australians.
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Old 1st November 2018, 08:49 PM   #181
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Well that escalated quickly.

I think that Australians are uniquely... Australian. They're on the side of good, and none of their faults are intolerable.
Why thank you.
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Old 1st November 2018, 08:50 PM   #182
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
You clearly have absolutely zero understanding of Australians.
Yeah, that statement just makes no sense.

Or maybe it does make sense if you're a USAian, I dunno. I hope not.
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Old 1st November 2018, 08:53 PM   #183
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Also, I've just had a bit of a look, and I can't find any statistics on how many people spend time in jail for refusing to pay the fine for not voting. I expect that the number is vanishingly small. While the option is technically available, I'd be mildly surprised if the number of people it happened to were above zero.
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Old 1st November 2018, 09:15 PM   #184
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Here is the full text for the non voting Law.


Quote:
Non-voters


28. An elector will be guilty of an offence under s 245 of the Electoral Act and s 130 of the Referendum Act if the elector fails to vote at an election or a referendum without a valid and sufficient reason.
29. Under s 245(2) of the Electoral Act and s 45(2) of the Referendum Act the Electoral Commissioner is responsible for preparing a list for each division of the names and addresses of the electors who appear to have failed to vote at an election or referendum. Electors who have been identified as an apparent non-voter will be included on this list.
30. This list is then provided to each Divisional Returning Officer (DRO) so that a penalty notice may be sent by post to every elector whose name and address appears on the list of apparent non-voters within three months of the election or referendum (see s 245(3) of the Electoral Act and s 45(2) of the Referendum Act).
31. Under s 245(4) and s 45(4) the DRO is not required to send a penalty notice to electors who have died, were absent from Australia on election day or polling day, were known to be ineligible to vote at the election or referendum, or who have supplied a valid and sufficient reason for not voting.
32. The penalty notice posted to an elector advises that he or she appears to have failed to vote and that it is an offence to fail to vote at an election or referendum without a valid and sufficient reason. The elector is further advised that if he or she does not wish to have the matter dealt with by a court, the elector may, within a specified time either:
  • advise the DRO of the circumstances in which they did in fact vote
  • advise the DRO of the valid and sufficient reason why they did not vote, or
  • pay to the DRO a penalty of $20.
33. If no reply is received to the first penalty notice, a second penalty notice must be sent by the DRO.
34. Under s 245(11) of the Electoral Act or s 45(11) of the Referendum Act, if an elector is unable to respond to correspondence from the DRO because of absence from his or her residential address or because of physical incapacity, then another elector who has personal knowledge of the facts may respond on behalf of the elector who appears to have failed to vote.
35. If the elector pays to the DRO the $20 penalty for failing to vote, then the matter ends there.
36. Where an elector responds to the penalty notice and provides a reason for not voting, the DRO must be satisfied that the reasons provided were valid and sufficient in accordance with s 245(5) or s 45(5). If the DRO is not satisfied that the reason provided is valid and sufficient, then the DRO must, in accordance with s 245(9) or s 45(9), write to the elector advising that:
  1. the DRO is not satisfied, and
  2. that if the elector does not wish to have the matter dealt with by a court, the elector may pay the penalty of $20.
37. Where an elector fails to pay the penalty of $20, an elector may be prosecuted in accordance with s 245(15) or s 45(15).
38. An elector may be prosecuted for failing to vote at an election or a referendum without a valid and sufficient reason, or for making a false or misleading statement in response to a penalty notice issued by a DRO (see s 245(15) and(15C) of the Electoral Act and s 45(14) and (14C) of the Referendum Act). . If a person is found guilty of this offence, a court may impose a penalty of 1 penalty unit, currently a maximum penalty of $210. In addition, court costs may also be payable. The value of a penalty unit is set by section 4AA of the Crimes Act 1914 (Cth).
39. It should be noted that if a non-voter has been convicted and fined by a court, and the non-voter decides not to pay the fine, then it is for the court to decide what action should be taken or if a further penalty should be imposed. The action taken by the court in relation to fine defaulters may vary depending on the state or territory in which the conviction is recorded, and may involve community service orders, seizure of goods, or a short period in jail. In some jurisdictions the court may have no alternative to ordering a jail sentence for fine defaulters. However, this is a matter for the courts and not for the AEC.


It looks like you would have to try very, very hard to go to Jail without passing go.


Norm
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Old 1st November 2018, 09:52 PM   #185
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Originally Posted by fromdownunder View Post
Well most of us do work on "If it aint broke, don't fix it'. The system of Parliamentary democracy that have is certainly not broke. Another Federal Government is 90% likely to be thrown out by next May. A State Government is more than likely to be retained later this month.

I personally do not believe that 5 - 10 minutes once every three years is much of a price to pay for what we have, and what we can do. It is not just voting. There is the Sausage sizzle and social events as well.

Vote early, don't have breakfast just grab a snag and coffee at the booth, and look at the second hand goods sale, then shop or go watch the kids play footy, cricket, tennis, soccer, swim etc, or take them to the park, or chat with friends and neighbors (usually about anything but politics - weather is a good topic, but footy not so much - it is likely to lead to bigger arguments than who should win the election), or just go home and chill. Work your day around the ballot, or vote in the previous couple of weeks at a pre-pollday station or by mail.

It can be said that this is an imposition. That's fine. That's what some people believe. I agree that it can be, but 5 - 10 minutes twice every five to six years is a pretty minor imposition and well worth the effort.

Norm
Ah, you have forgotten the important principal ďvote early, vote oftenĒ.

Seriously, the thing that should give critics of our system pause is that informal votes account for 5% nation wide, with donkey votes estimated at no more than one percent or so, but letís be super conservative and say thatís also 5%. That means that 90% of voters (and a very large proportion of the total population) have put some effort into casting a vote they intended to and a vote that counts. Iím extremely proud of this. If people thought they were being dragged to the ballot box and forced to vote, informal votes would be through the roof.

Australians do have a sense of civic responsibility. Fantastic.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:00 PM   #186
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I imagine so.

I'm saying that getting to the polling booth should be a matter of individual choice, not government compulsion. Regardless of how much it increases your happiness meter to know people are voting for stuff.
But it's not just about "increasing your happiness meter", it's about the objective fact that a high percentage of them vote. That's what compulsory voting is trying to achieve, and it has achieved it.

You say that it's not about that, but the fact that it's achieved that seems like good enough evidence to me that that was the point. Regardless, whatever it was about to some nameless people who support it, the question of whether or not it has achieved a high percentage of voters (actually voting, not just "donkey" voting), has a answer, in the affirmative.

Is that outcome meaningful to you? Maybe yes or maybe no. To me it seems important in a democracy that a high percentage of the population actually casts a vote, and so this outcome seems positive to me.

You are right that there is an opportunity cost for every voter. But you can't ignore what compulsory voting has achieved. You may not value that achievement, in which case the costs outweigh the benefits in your calculation. You might also think that some less costly method could achieve the same voter turn out, if so feel free to present one.

Personally I think the outcome is positive and worth the cost. But I'm willing to be convinced otherwise.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:06 PM   #187
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Originally Posted by TragicMonkey View Post
Depends on how you define success. Most species of shark aren't particularly cooperative, and they've been around for hundreds of millions of years, far longer than most mammals.
I'm guessing "social cooperators" was more in reference to social insects and other similar organisms. Look at the total biomass of ants compared to beetles.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:12 PM   #188
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Originally Posted by lionking View Post
Ah, you have forgotten the important principal ďvote early, vote oftenĒ.

Seriously, the thing that should give critics of our system pause is that informal votes account for 5% nation wide, with donkey votes estimated at no more than one percent or so, but letís be super conservative and say thatís also 5%. That means that 90% of voters (and a very large proportion of the total population) have put some effort into casting a vote they intended to and a vote that counts. Iím extremely proud of this. If people thought they were being dragged to the ballot box and forced to vote, informal votes would be through the roof.

Australians do have a sense of civic responsibility. Fantastic.
I absolutely agree. And I believe that our mandatory voting is at least in part responsible for this.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:14 PM   #189
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Originally Posted by MikeG View Post
Yes, they are. They freely chose to have a system of compulsion for the greater good. They chose it. Read that again. And again....... Not only did they choose this system, but it's a system they could end at any time if they chose........and guess what? They don't so choose.
No, some of them chose it, and all of them must comply with it.

That doesn't make it wrong, but democratically enacted policy is different from free choice.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:21 PM   #190
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
It's a pants-on-head-retarded question, asked in bad faith and stacked with fallacies.

And I've just given you my position on Australians.
Did you read the post that it was in response to? Joe suggested that if Americans tried compulsory voting a huge block of them would draw crude pictures on the ballets, or otherwise just make joke votes.

Australians don't do this.

So, if he's right, there's got to be something different about Americans vs. Australians that leads to that different outcome.

But I'm pretty sure that the point was the Joe is probably not right, and that Americans, like Australians, would actually generally just vote for the candidates that they like, in order from most to least.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:25 PM   #191
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
So why the law and the fines and whatnot? I've asked this several times but nobody seems to want to answer it. If Australians are so into voting, why does it have to be compulsory?
It's conceivable to me that the law has led to a culture in which voting is considered a civic duty, but that if they law were removed then over time that culture would change.

If that's the case then changing the law today wouldn't lead to a huge difference in voter turn out in the next election (a small dip?) but would lead to a slow decline over time as the culture changed.

I say it's conceivable, but it's also possible that a change in the law would lead to an immediate drop in voter turn out, I don't know. Still, I think the scenario I posited isn't unreasonable, and shows that the presence and necessity of the law isn't incompatible with a culture in which voting is highly valued by most people.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:25 PM   #192
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Originally Posted by MikeG View Post
That's a silly false equivalence. The society in the USSR was forced upon the public without them having a choice. Australia have a vibrant democracy, and if there was a groundswell of opinion against compulsory voting there would be MPs elected on that platform, and eventually there would be a change. This is in effect a voluntary agreement by individuals, entered into freely.
Interestingly, the USA is actually listed as a 'flawed democracy, where the Ozzies (along with Canada and the UK are all listed as 'full democracies'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democr...Index_2017.svg

Full list at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democr...country_(2017)

So if anything, it is the 'international team' that should be teaching the USA contingent on how it's done 'properly'
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:34 PM   #193
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Originally Posted by MikeG View Post
What on earth......

Why does everything come down to guns with some people? There are no guns involved here. I'll warrant that never at any stage in the history of Australia has a gun been used to force someone to vote, or as a consequence of them not having voted.
Well sorta....

Quote:
The Eureka Rebellion was a rebellion in 1854, instigated by gold miners in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, who revolted against the colonial authority of the United Kingdom. It culminated in the Battle of the Eureka Stockade, which was fought between miners and the colonial forces of Australia on 3 December 1854 at Eureka Lead and named for the stockade structure built by miners during the conflict.[2] The rebellion resulted in the deaths of at least 27 people, the majority of whom were rebels.

The rebellion was the culmination of a period of civil disobedience in the Ballarat region during the Victorian gold rush with miners objecting to the expense of a miner's licence, taxation via the licence without representation, and the actions of the government, the police and military.[3][4] The local rebellion grew from a Ballarat Reform League movement and culminated in the erection by the rebels of a crude battlement and a swift and deadly siege by colonial forces.

Mass public support for the captured rebels in the colony's capital of Melbourne when they were placed on trial resulted in the introduction of the Electoral Act 1856, which mandated suffrage for male colonists in the lower house in the Victorian parliament. This is considered the second instituted act of political democracy in Australia.[3] Female colonists of South Australia were awarded suffrage 5 years later on condition of owning property, much in the way men did not have full suffrage in the absence of property ownership.[5] As such, the Eureka Rebellion is controversially identified with the birth of democracy in Australia and interpreted by some as a political revolt.[6][7][8]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eureka_Rebellion
It gave us our 'Southern cross' or Eureka Flag
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:41 PM   #194
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Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post
False dichotomy.
If the argument is that Americans are too stupid to properly use the voting systems that Australians seem to use just fine, I don't see that it is.
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Old 1st November 2018, 10:42 PM   #195
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
There's the cultural disconnect. You have the "luxury" (I guess you would consider it that) to say meh, I don't think I'll vote.

We, on the other hand, consider it a civic duty. When I was young and dumb I used to vote informally, but now that I'm older, I'm more mature, and I realise that voting is a duty and a privilege. Not everyone in all countries gets to vote. I participate in the political process because I want to. There's no way I'd ever, ever, consider not doing so, even if there were no law mandating that I do so. It's utterly unthinkable. Why would I do that?
To answer your question- so we dont get people like The Orange One running our country...
Thats what not having compulsory voting gets you...
(We have had some right gits in charge, but I think we can safely say that not one has EVER gotten to that stage...)
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Old 1st November 2018, 11:11 PM   #196
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Originally Posted by Dabop View Post
To answer your question- so we dont get people like The Orange One running our country...
Thats what not having compulsory voting gets you...
(We have had some right gits in charge, but I think we can safely say that not one has EVER gotten to that stage...)
My opinion - and it is only an opinion - is that non-compulsory voting has a tendency to polarise elections. Candidates have to cater to the far extremes of the left and right in order to get votes, because those people are the ones who are motivated to actually cast votes. People with non-extreme views tend to stay at home.

That's how Trump got elected. The people with extreme views elected him. And the Republican gerrymander, and voter suppression... which can't happen in Australia... well the gerrymander can (and has) but voter suppression can't.
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Old 1st November 2018, 11:29 PM   #197
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I tend to agree with that arthwollipot, I find that things like local council meetings show this quite well- everyone can attend, but in actuality, only the ones with a personal axe to grind ever attend...
Non compulsory voting would tend to go the same way, where the more 'rabid' supporters (maybe only on a single topic) would be more inclined to go out and vote- artificially skewing their representatives viewpoint of how their society is running and what is of importance to the society as a whole

"But of course I voted yes on painting all rabbits pink-95% of my voters demanded something be done about white rabbits!"
"How many voted for you?"
"five"
"out of a population of a million"
"Yes, but I beat the other guy, he only got 3 votes, so obviously most people wanted rabbits painted"

Totally ignores that 999992 people didn't vote at all but couldn't be bothered driving 5 hours to get a 'valid' ID, beforehand, then driving another two hours to stand in line for 3 hours to actually vote, assuming they haven't been jailed for a parking ticket or somesuch nonsense in their distant past (hyperbole I know, no need to point it out)

Hmmm I'm starting to see a pattern here
;-)

One thing I can't understand is that even living and working in some of the most remote rural locations, I never had to drive two hours to get to a voting booth (people in very remote locations are welcomed- in fact encouraged to prepoll/postal vote their votes), in fact I can say that never have I actually had to drive more than15/20 minutes tops to get to a postal voting station, and never had to wait in line more than a minute or two- somehow we manage to be able to do this in a country that is as large as the continental connected US states, with a tiny population- yet somehow this cant be done in the US with its vastly larger population available to be drawn on to run polling stations....

Baffling....
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Old 1st November 2018, 11:49 PM   #198
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Originally Posted by lionking View Post
........Australians do have a sense of civic responsibility. Fantastic.
This is the actual cultural divide here, no matter the previous claims. theprestige treats civic responsibility as a negative. There's a reason his society is as dysfunctional as it is.
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Old 1st November 2018, 11:57 PM   #199
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Originally Posted by Dabop View Post
...........I can say that never have I actually had to drive more than15/20 minutes tops to get to a postal voting station, and never had to wait in line more than a minute or two- somehow we manage to be able to do this in a country that is as large as the continental connected US states, with a tiny population- yet somehow this cant be done in the US with its vastly larger population available to be drawn on to run polling stations....

Baffling....
I don't think it's baffling at all, given that most polling stations are manned by volunteers. If a country is full of people who think only of "me, me, me", as evidenced by theprestige's interminable repetition of that priniciple, and who apparently hold civic responsibility in contempt (again, the evidence comes from the prestige), then how on earth would you find enough volunteers to man polling stations?

Oh, and voter suppression (in the western world), is only a thing in the USA. Literally nowhere else has the problem. Americans commenting in this thread might see compulsory voting as a possible answer to that issue were it to apply to the USA, but that is not something you can ascribe to the Australian situation.
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Last edited by MikeG; 2nd November 2018 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 2nd November 2018, 12:02 AM   #200
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I checked the requirements and here they are if you can't vote in person at a polling booth
(and they do, or at least did, when I was living remote, send a prepoll vote form by mail to you prior to the election, so if you were like me, you simply filled it out and stuck it back in the mailbox, the mail picked it up on their next run and that was that over and done with)

here they are
Quote:
Early vote Eligibility requirements

You can vote early either in person or by post if on election day you:

are outside the electorate where you are enrolled to vote
are more than 8km from a polling place
are travelling
are unable to leave your workplace to vote
are seriously ill, infirm or due to give birth shortly (or caring for someone who is)
are a patient in hospital and can't vote at the hospital
have religious beliefs that prevent you from attending a polling place
are in prison serving a sentence of less than three years or otherwise detained
are a silent elector
have a reasonable fear for your safety.

Early vote in person

You can vote in person at an early voting centre or any AEC divisional office in the weeks leading to an election.

A list of early voting centres will be available during a federal election.
Early vote by post

After an election is announced, you can apply for a postal vote online, or complete a postal vote application form.
So bloody easy, even an ozzie can do it!!!


eta even people IN prison can vote- as long as you arent detained at her majesty's pleasure for more than three years- none of this exfelons can't vote garbage- imho once you do your time, then it should be a clean slate
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