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Old 9th April 2009, 10:04 AM   #41
HawaiiBigSis
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So near as I can tell, Straya* is a land of myth, with occasional magical sunsets.

With the help of Google Maps a while back, I calculated that it is possible to drive around the continent/country/island in approximately nine days of driving time. Is that actually possible, or are there sections of roads that are non-existent?

Is it possible to travel by plane over the center of the country?

I'd be interested in dreamtime stories/pre-contact history; what reading would be recommended?

I admit that most of what I "know" about Australia is from books and small conversations with others. Bryce Courtenay wrote a series of three books based in Tasmania (I think), and I found it very interesting, and possibly historically accurate for the time period, but I have no way of knowing.

*And is that really the Koori (didn't know that politically correct term before this morning -- thanks!) name for the land?
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Old 9th April 2009, 10:08 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
Clont the thyacine and I'll really be impressed.
For a moment I thought you were channeling pillory...
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Old 9th April 2009, 10:10 AM   #43
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Damn, I thought this thread was about that crappy Nicole Kidman/Hugh Jackman movie.
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Old 9th April 2009, 01:46 PM   #44
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Ladies and Gentlemen. May I introduce, to those who may not have met him in the threads, my friend and compatriot, Old Bob.

Bob hails from Gympie, Queensland and he has many stories to tell. I promise you that every one of them will end up going somewhere interesting. Now we're really on a roll.

Please forgive Bob's style of posting, should you feel it worthy of any criticism. We all have our little ways about us. My responses will tidy up a little.

Bob is the inspiration for this thread.


Welcome Bob. The game is afoot!

I meant no offence with regard to your posting style. I can read it just fine.


Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
Shrike mentioned the Duyfken. It so happens that we met a tradesman who made parts of the replica. He was making the stern light in Winton and trying to flatten cow horns for the lens of the light (flattened horns polished are transparent and tough). I had the right gear with me so over a few drinks we did the job. That little ship started the modern day exploriation of Australia.

Please follow the links in the Bobquotes™ which lead to external sources of information. A number of posters will let me know if this is not the case.

The story of the replica Duyfken was unknown to me before now. Thank you.

I notice too, that the Winton link above contains this reference to the famous dinosaurs.

Winton Dinosaurs

Quote:
It was ascertained that these Trackways dated back to the Cretaceous Period, 95 million years ago.

Strewth, that's older than both of us laid end-to-end, or something.


Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
Captan Cook came here with maps to est. a military outpost and got rid of the Spanish huts that were there (about 400). Don't know if anybody was home at the time.

Although I haven't found a reference, I wonder if Cook and his men might have noticed the native gunyahs of the Eora people and mistook them for Spanish huts. 400 dwellings seems a credible number.

The first aboriginals that Cook observed were very cautious of the men from the big ships, and would often melt into the bush when the sailors approached them.



Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
Just more stuff that they don't teach in our schools.

I think they do what they can with the limited time and resources available. Life itself teaches us the best lessons anyway.



Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
Why sail all the way down the coast to land? My reasoning would be is Cook was a Mason and tried to get as close to 33° lat. as possible.



Additional information: The starting location pin is at Pi-Broadford (wdne). It's sticking out of the ground in the Palace garden, near the shrubbery. Gympie is a bit to the north of the map area.



Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
No doubt England had it all planned to open up Australia by jailing a huge work(slave) force.

England had huge problems with the squalor and overcrowding of both her domestic prisons and her existing penal colonies.

England had ships.

England claimed sovereignty over a continent that turned out to have an area of 7 692 024 square kilometres


WWJD? England loaded a number of prisoners onto ships and sent the First Fleet to Australia.



Instructions from the Home Secretary, Lord Sydney to Captain Arthur Phillip.

Quote:

. . . We, reposing especial trust and confidence in your loyalty, courage and experience in military affairs, do, by these presents, constitute and appoint you to be Governor of our territory called New South Wales, extending from the northern cape or extremity of the coast called Cape York, in the latitude of 10° 37' south, to the southern extremity of the said territory of New South Wales or South Cape, in the latitude 43° 39' south, and all the country inland and westward as far as the one hundred and thirty-fifth degree of longitude, reckoning from the meridian of Greenwich, including all the islands adjacent in the Pacific Ocean, within the latitude aforesaid of 10° 37' south and 43° 39' south, and of all towns, garrisons, castles, forts and all other fortifications or other military works, which now are or may be hereafter erected upon this said territory. You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of Governor in and over our said territory by doing and performing all and all manner of things thereunto belonging, and we do hereby strictly charge and command all our officers and soldiers who shall be employed within our said territory, and all others whom it may concern, to obey you as our Governor thereof; and you are to observe and follow such orders and directions from time to time as you shall receive from us, or any other your superior officer according to the rules and discipline of war, and likewise such orders and directions as we shall send you under our signet or sign manual, or by our High Treasurer or Commissioners of our Treasury, for the time being, or one of our Principal Secretaries of State, in pursuance of the trust we hereby repose in you.

Given at our Court at St, James's, the twelfth day of October 1786, in the twenty-sixth year of our reign.

Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Quote:
Britain decided to use its new outpost as a penal colony. The First Fleet of 11 ships carried about 1500 people – half of them convicts. About 160 000 men and women were brought to Australia as convicts from 1788 until penal transportation ended in 1868. The convicts were joined by free immigrants beginning in the early 1790s.

Wikipedia

Quote:
Phillip had a very difficult time assembling the fleet which was to make the eight-month sea voyage to Australia. Everything a new colony might need had to be taken, since Phillip had no real idea of what he might find when he got there. There were few funds available for equipping the expedition. His suggestion that people with experience in farming, building and crafts be included was rejected. Most of the 772 convicts (of whom 732 survived the voyage) were petty thieves from the London slums. Phillip was accompanied by a contingent of marines and a handful of other officers who were to administer the colony.

There's no denying that those poor bloody Poms* did it tough. In many ways they were worse off than slaves, whose owners had a vested interest in the well-being of their workforce. Governor Phillip had no choice in the matter, however, since the entire colony found itself in dire straits, and almost starved.

* My reference defines this as a derogatory term. I dispute that this is always true. We Aussies play fast and loose with our epithets and such, and Bob and I are notorious for it. We mean no offence. It's a matter of context really, and we'll show you how it works if you stick with us.


The fact is, that whole crew were slaves to the environment, descibed in her usual manner of highlighting the extremes of our country, by Dorothea Mackellar:


The stark white ring-barked forests,
All tragic to the moon,
The sapphire-misted mountains,
The hot gold hush of noon,
Green tangle of the brushes
Where lithe lianas coil,
And orchids deck the tree-tops,
And ferns the warm dark soil.



In the strange and dangerous place they had found themselves, it was all uphill, and I suggest that the Marines, the free settlers and the Governor himself, did little better than their charges.

Conditions improved dramatically after the first two hard years, and as the convicts served out their time and joined the free men and women at work on their new home, our nation was founded.


They made it Bob, and here we are. Crikey.


Here is Governor Phillip's legacy


Quote:

Phillip established the convict colony in NSW, which he governed in a sensible and humane way, despite adverse conditions which included poor quality food, largely infertile land and a lack of experienced farm labour which led to near-famine. He requested to be allowed to return to England in 1790, pleading ill-health, and eventually sailed for England in 1792, leaving a colony with more than 1,700 acres of land under cultivation or cleared and ready for sowing and which, within another year, was almost able to support itself.





Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
The USA has a large stock of prisoners now; have they a plan?

I'll bet they do, but I doubt if it's colonising Australia. They don't even speak the lingo.


Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
As for Australia being the crime country?? We don't lock most up and have little trouble. Some city areas can be a bit rough but on the whole not too bad. Usually a good reason for murder especially tribal.

Yeah, we're doing alright, I think. Gangs are a worry in many parts of the world, and at least it's good to see the authorities doing something about the outlaw motorcycle groups.

Here are some examples of this:

New South Wales

Queensland

Northern Territory

Western Australia


Frankly, I like bickies, especially Tim Tams



Not a bad little post, Bob, and thanks again for your help.


Cheers Mate,

Dave
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Old 9th April 2009, 02:22 PM   #45
Akhenaten
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
I dispute.

CAN-bra

not

can-BE-ra

Like

MEL-burn

not

mel-BORN

and

BRIS-bn

not

bris-BAYN



I've never been born, like Mel.

And I've never been laid, like Ad.

I've never won, like Dar

And I've never been kneed, Like Syd.


And I've never, no I've never.

No I've never, not ever.


No I've never, seen an astle, like Newc.
- Bob hudson, 1974
From the album The Newcastle Song
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Old 9th April 2009, 02:38 PM   #46
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It is true that Old Bob taught in the Philosophy Department of the University of Watermaloo?
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Old 9th April 2009, 02:52 PM   #47
Akhenaten
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Originally Posted by The Central Scrutinizer View Post
In the Australian language, "Fosters" means beer.

This was very much true at one stage, largely due to the escapades of a bloke by the name of Barry McKenzie



Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
And in the Australian language, "The Central Scrutinizer" means "beaten with cricket bats, stomped upon with Doc Martens and left bleeding and bloody in the gutter outside a Kings Cross brothel".

I've heard that. He may be joking with us though.



Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
Made funnier by the fact that the crap has been brewed in Canada for years, and will be soon manufactured in the USA

Why yes, he was. As we all quite well know, Carlton Draught means beer, Cooper's Original Pale means better beer and Cascade Pale Ale means headache.

Most Queenslanders enjoy Castlemaine Fourex. There is an old tale which says that Queenslanders named this brew "XXXX" because they couldn't spell beer. Old Bob may dispute this, but in any case, the XXXX logo gives rise to the name that non-fourex drinkers have for it - barbed wire.

Another curiosity with this beer is that a person wishing to obtain 12 bottles of it will give his order as "Four dozen X's, thanks mate."


Cheers, literally, and LeChaim to my hebrew mates everywhere.

Time for a beer.
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Old 9th April 2009, 03:20 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
The pleasure is all mine. But it is sometimes amazing to consider what a rag tag bunch of sea sick ruffians managed to carve out of the landscape.

I would often sit down by the harbour at night and enjoy the lights of the city and ponder if Arthur Phillip, ever quiet realised what helped to start would become this.

As have I. I'm Sydney born, but most say I have no breeding.

Old Bob Was kind enough to bring this very subject up in his first post. I hope we did it justice.


Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
For anyone visiting Sydney as a tourist. I would highly reccomend taking the Manly ferry trip around sunset. As the light dulls and city lights come on, it is an almost magical and calming sensation

It is. And both accessible and affordable.


Here are some pictures of Sydney Harbour:




Looking back the other way, more or less.





Here is a night scene which is very close to MG1962's description.



I you don't live in Sydney, you're just camping out, some say.
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Old 9th April 2009, 03:34 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by tomwaits View Post
Speaker: The member from North Sydney with a point of order.

Joe Hockey: Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is a complete twit and-

Speaker: THE MEMBER WILL RESUME HIS SEAT! THERE IS NO POINT OF ORDER!



Ahhh, I love question time.

I enjoy watching Joe Hockey and Kevin Rudd sparring with each other on Sunrise.

Regardless of your politics, they put on a good show.
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Old 9th April 2009, 03:40 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by Zax63 View Post
I'd love to visit Australia if it wasn't for the drop bears.




Also mentioned here, CLOSER TO HOME !!eleven! Everybody Panic.
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Old 9th April 2009, 03:55 PM   #51
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Speaking as a non-whinging Pom I'd like to say that I love Australia, and the Australian people*, I had a great few months there and it's a bloody marvellous country. Sydney was spectacular, Melbourne was great, but for me the remote west was unforgettable.

I'm sure there's a variety of striking phrases a true Aussie could use to describe your state of mind f you think you can drive round it in nine days though, HawaiiBigSis. Nine days!


*well, nearly all of them
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Old 9th April 2009, 04:02 PM   #52
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Oz has more venemous species of anything you care to mention than anywhere else in the world -- hell, everywhere else in the world.

You can die from heat stroke or under a snow avalanche.

In parts of the Nularbor, you pay for water by the glass, cash across the bar, or go thirsty -- very thirsty when it's 120 F on Christmas Day.

The crocodiles grow to 25 feet. On a diet of incautious tourists.

Damn! but I can't stay away much longer!
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Old 9th April 2009, 04:24 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by TX50 View Post
It should be Lieutenant Cook. He wasn't made post until 1775. The king
personally handed him his commission. If you insist on his later rank then
you'll have to add his scientific credentials too; Captain James Cook FRS RN

You appear to be entirely correct. Here is some evidence:


Captain Cook Timeline

Quote:
30 July 1775

'Resolution' returns with Cook to England after 3 years & 18 days, and anchors at Spithead. he is received by King George III.

Quote:
12 July 1776

Cook's third voyage of discovery is to be his last. He sets sail on his promotion to Captain, with 'Resolution' and 'Discovery', the latter not joining up until 1st August. Objectives of the voyage are further exploration of the Pacific and to investigate the presence of an exit from the North West Passage.

England's greatest mariner, explorer and navigator

Quote:
The two ships returned to England, via Cape Horn, on 29 July 1775. The experimental diets and close attention to cleanliness had a miraculous effect: out of a crew of 118, only one man was lost to disease!

Since public interest was high, the many paintings by the artists were widely displayed and published as engravings. James Cook was also awarded the Copley Gold Medal and elected as a fellow of the Royal Society.

I acknowledge my omission of the great man's complete set of post-nominal letters, and thank you for the correction.

I also note that many references use the form Captain James Cook RN., FRS.

I'd say it's iffy, and the order might just depend on whether the biographer is a military man or a scientist.



Here is another interesting Captain Cook FRS RN fact:


Captain Cook's Cottage was built in both North Yorkshire, England and in Melbourne, Australia. It appears to have settled down these days.



Here is a tribute to James Cook:

Quote:
Although world renowned as an explorer. Captain James Cook RN., FRS, was essentially a technician and his skill as a surveyor and draughtsman were to set the seal on the quality of British prepared charts which still exists today. His work led to the formation of the Royal Navy Survey Squadrons whose charts are second to none with every ship afloat carrying its share of Admiralty Charts.

Cook rose from the humble farm labourer's cottage to being commissioned in the Royal Navy, received by George III and acknowledged by the country for his achievements. It was said of him: " His general knowledge was extensive and various... the most determined resolution, he pursued his object with unshaken perseverance... Cool and intrepid among dangers : patient and firm under difficulties and distress... In every situation he stood unrivalled and alone; on him all eyes were turned: he was our leading star, which at its setting left us involved in darkness and despair".


© The Captain Cook Tourism Association


Gosh.
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Old 9th April 2009, 04:28 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Greg44 View Post
Aussie! Aussie! Aussie! Please, just, don't

I spent two weeks in 2000 with some sort of cringe reflex contorting my torso intermittently.


I, for one, share your cringe.
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Old 9th April 2009, 04:38 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by ZirconBlue View Post
I don't know where you people get your information, but everything posted so far is wrong, wrong, wrong.

First, it's spelled "Austria".

Second, it's not an island; it's a landlocked country in Central Europe.

Seriously. Can't you people do a little bit of research before posting?

Ach! Buggeren! I vish I am noticing this zooner. Now I vill haff to be geshtarting again. Danke for catching ziss misstöken before ze tanks are beginning mitt der rolling into Pola before I mention ze var.


Alzo, ist not gerschpelt "worng, worng, worng"?


Cheeren


Hans
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Old 9th April 2009, 05:22 PM   #56
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Our Coat of Arms was chosen not by taste but because both creatures can't reverse. Hence the nation can't go backwards (smart thinking) They act the same as the Government, steal and break the farmer. One roo eats the same amount of grass as about 4 sheep and the emu fouls pasture so cattle won't eat it and then it busts fences. Their feathers are bullet proof from light calibre but not from the back end. A sight to be seen is a big emu run through a fence at high speed. This is how it can be Gidgi fire, sun set in the sticks, marinated emu steaks, bottle of red and soft sand. Plus a little Aeroguard ........
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Old 9th April 2009, 05:22 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by The Central Scrutinizer View Post
In the Australian language, "Fosters" means beer.
sorry, fosters is cr@p we pass of to foreigners.
no one here actually drinks it.

we really drink stuff like XXXX (also known as mothers milk).

edit - i see i was beaten to the punch. bugga
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Old 9th April 2009, 05:26 PM   #58
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[quote=Akhenaten;4601885]Two islands actually. Your omission likely resulted from my error in the OP in failing to acknowledge our Southern Gem, the beautiful island state of Tasmania.


From my book-learning at school we was taught that tazzy is linked to the mainland by a land bridge that since the first fleet landed has gone under water. If i remember rightly tazzy was called van diemens land then.

edit - regardless, tazzy has awesome landscapes and best of all, the beer they make with the tazzy tiger on it, cascade i think, bloody bewdiful
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Old 9th April 2009, 05:59 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
You mean you moved to the West Island, my Anzac brother.





ETA: In typical Australian fashion, the Turks, against whom we once fought many fierce battles, are now our good mates.

Greetings to you; you are also my brothers-in-arms and it was a bloody good stoush. A draw, I believe.


A Turkish memorial to their fallen opponents

More of the same


That is respect.
Having spent ANZAC day in Turkey in 2008, I would have to say that while all the tour guides paint it as a draw, the Turk in the street sees it as a great victory. They seem to have forgetton that while they may have won the battle, they lost the war.
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Old 9th April 2009, 06:22 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
So near as I can tell, Straya* is a land of myth, with occasional magical sunsets.
The "magical sunsets" is a myth. We actually have real sunsets. They're magic.

D'oh


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
With the help of Google Maps a while back, I calculated that it is possible to drive around the continent/country/island in approximately nine days of driving time. Is that actually possible, or are there sections of roads that are non-existent?
Eleven days is the best I know of for a round-trip, by a mate of mine on a BMW R100RS. I'd love to hear from others about their best times. Some of the roads are similar to what you would see in the Paris-Dhakar Rally, others are Freeways. You can't do it in the Wet Season, from October - May because the top bit is covered with water which is full of crocodiles hunting taipan snakes and you for lunch. Alternatively, you can bypass this bit and go around the North coast in a small boat with an outboard motor, known as a tinny. (because it's made out of aluminium) You're pretty safe at sea from the crocodiles, because the sharks eat most of them

I've done it all myself, except for Tassy, but not all in one hit.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
Is it possible to travel by plane over the center of the country?
An aircraft from my squadron set a record for doing this very thing. Less extreme commercial flights are readily accessible over the Red Heart.


Pilatus Porter Facts

Quote:
On 8th August 1983, Dennis Coffey captained A14-701, an Australian Army PC-6/B1-H2, from Carnarvon, on the West Coast of Australia (in Western Australia) to Brisbane on the East Coast (Queensland) and established a certified World Record in the category of "Distance in a straight line" - some 3,893 kilometres, which was set by flying as high as 27,000 feet and in minus 41 degrees celsius temperatures. The crew also achieved two Australian (national) records during the flight.
I helped to maintain this particular aircraft for many years. It crashed and burned in Vietnam years before this record-breaking flight and all that was recovered was the brass serial number plate from the empennage. This was all we needed to order spare parts, so we ordered many, many spare parts and rebuilt the aircraft.

We appear to have done it rather well.

Another of "my" aircraft is in the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. It's a Bell 3G-B1 Sioux helicopter, similar to those seen on M*A*S*H. We referred to the Sioux as the S-ten-UX in the same way that a bird became a B-one-RD.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
I'd be interested in dreamtime stories/pre-contact history; what reading would be recommended?
That will become one of the more fascinating aspects of this thread, and it will be huge. The story has been 40 000 years in the making, and we're still adding to it.

The subject will come up often, since the ancient heritage of Australia affects many aspects of who we are today, and the Koori are an integral part of that heritage.

You'll just have to be Patient™


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
I admit that most of what I "know" about Australia is from books and small conversations with others. Bryce Courtenay wrote a series of three books based in Tasmania (I think), and I found it very interesting, and possibly historically accurate for the time period, but I have no way of knowing.
Yes and no. 1 billion times better than Dan Brown, Bryce Courtenay doesn't write reference books, but the settings for his stories are accurate.

You must read some Ion Idriess books.

I hope this thread will flesh out your knowledge of our country, as it meanders along.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
*And is that really the Koori (didn't know that politically correct term before this morning -- thanks!) name for the land?
Koori is as polite and respectful as say, Innuit, or Maori, or Masai. It's the name of their people. There are many clans and tribes under the blamket term of Koori. Context and delivery are the keys, as is the case everywhere.

I don't quite catch your meaning about the Koori name for Australia. All the blokes I've ever met call it Australia.

Different tribes, speaking different dialects, would have different names for their surroundings, and given their limited personal mobilty and lack of Google Earth, I doubt they would have felt a need to develop a concept of the Australian continent as a whole, although trade between clans, and stories of the dreaming would have given them a fair idea that it was really, really big.


Thank you for your brief question. Now go away!





Cheers
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Old 9th April 2009, 06:42 PM   #61
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TX50 is actually wrong. It is convention for a militaryl officer to be referred to historically by the rank or peerage they retired or died at. Example of this is Lord Nelson is rarely if ever refered to Vice Admiral Nelson. Because the peerage superceedss the militiary ranks.
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Old 9th April 2009, 06:48 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
Damn, I thought this thread was about that crappy Nicole Kidman/Hugh Jackman movie.

This thread wll pesent a thorough debunking of that . . . thing.

I will personally assist Ms Kidman with any of her bunking requirements.
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Old 9th April 2009, 06:52 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
It is true that Old Bob taught in the Philosophy Department of the University of Watermaloo?

I attended Bullamakanka University myself.
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Old 9th April 2009, 07:22 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by big-E View Post
I'm sure there's a variety of striking phrases a true Aussie could use to describe your state of mind f you think you can drive round it in nine days though, HawaiiBigSis. Nine days!
Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
Eleven days is the best I know of for a round-trip, by a mate of mine on a BMW R100RS. I'd love to hear from others about their best times. Some of the roads are similar to what you would see in the Paris-Dhakar Rally, others are Freeways. You can't do it in the Wet Season, from October - May because the top bit is covered with water which is full of crocodiles hunting taipan snakes and you for lunch. Alternatively, you can bypass this bit and go around the North coast in a small boat with an outboard motor, known as a tinny. (because it's made out of aluminium) You're pretty safe at sea from the crocodiles, because the sharks eat most of them
DRIVING TIME = the amount of time spent actually behind the wheel of a car, doing the driving.

To which must be added sleeping time, eating time, and time out of the car doing other things.

I did not mean to imply that anybody could do a drive around the continent in nine days, nor that a visitor should plan a 10-day visit with the intention of doing any such thing. Mostly my question was geared towards finding out if a circumnavigation by road was possible.


Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
That will become one of the more fascinating aspects of this thread, and it will be huge. The story has been 40 000 years in the making, and we're still adding to it.

The subject will come up often, since the ancient heritage of Australia affects many aspects of who we are today, and the Koori are an integral part of that heritage.

You'll just have to be Patient™
And I look forward to it.

Quote:
Yes and no. 1 billion times better than Dan Brown, Bryce Courtenay doesn't write reference books, but the settings for his stories are accurate.

You must read some Ion Idriess books.

I hope this thread will flesh out your knowledge of our country, as it meanders along.
Again, I didn't mean to imply that the books were intended to be historically accurate, just were a source of what little tiny bit I know about Australian history. I will note the sources you quote here and elsewhere, and will try to catch up, at least a little...

Quote:
Koori is as polite and respectful as say, Innuit, or Maori, or Masai. It's the name of their people. There are many clans and tribes under the blamket term of Koori. Context and delivery are the keys, as is the case everywhere.
Gotcha.

Quote:
I don't quite catch your meaning about the Koori name for Australia. All the blokes I've ever met call it Australia.
Early on, proudnonbeliever said:
Originally Posted by proudnonbbeliever View Post
Australia, known as Straya (pronounced stray-ya) in the native tongue is a country, a continent and an island, all in one. Beat that.
I thought that was a literal name, but I see now that it's a way of saying the name of the country the way "real" Australians say it. (What can I say -- it was very early in my morning when I wrote that. I guess the sleep hadn't completely left my brain...)

Quote:
Different tribes, speaking different dialects, would have different names for their surroundings, and given their limited personal mobilty and lack of Google Earth, I doubt they would have felt a need to develop a concept of the Australian continent as a whole, although trade between clans, and stories of the dreaming would have given them a fair idea that it was really, really big.
And I look forward to hearing those stories, as they develop.

Quote:
Thank you for your brief question. Now go away!
but...but...but... I thought we were supposed to ask questions and stuff. Don't you all want to increase your tourism?
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Old 9th April 2009, 07:30 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by big-E View Post
Speaking as a non-whinging Pom I'd like to say that I love Australia, and the Australian people*, I had a great few months there and it's a bloody marvellous country. Sydney was spectacular, Melbourne was great, but for me the remote west was unforgettable.

I'm sure there's a variety of striking phrases a true Aussie could use to describe your state of mind f you think you can drive round it in nine days though, HawaiiBigSis. Nine days!


*well, nearly all of them

* Yeah, Crow-eaters mainly.


And there'll always be an England. I for one, have great pride in your alloted section of my flag.





Good-o.

Eskie's in the boot, chockers with chilly chunder tubes, the tin lids are at Nanna's and the sheilas have finally got all their **** in one sock.

Let's get this forni-bloody-catin' show on the frog and toad and see if we can make Tangambalanga in time for a countery.

Anyone bring a map?

Naaah, just keep the big blue bit on the same side and we'll lob back 'ere eventually.

Geez you're a drongo.

Strike me lucky cobber, your the one that forgot the bloody jaffle iron.

Yeah, righteo then, let's went.


Toodle-pip, old chap.
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Old 9th April 2009, 07:37 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
And there'll always be an England. I for one, have great pride in your alloted section of my flag.
And there's an England's flag in the same part of my state's flag as well, and our islands were also "discovered" by Captain Cook.

Our natives just had the good sense to eat him.
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Old 9th April 2009, 07:43 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
TX50 is actually wrong. It is convention for a militaryl officer to be referred to historically by the rank or peerage they retired or died at. Example of this is Lord Nelson is rarely if ever refered to Vice Admiral Nelson. Because the peerage superceedss the militiary ranks.

I believe that TX50 was making the valid point that I had simply forgotten the post-nominal for Cook's Fellowship of the Royal Society.

There is no real question that he is entitled to be referred to by the highest rank attained - Captain. The point, I think, is that I was creating an anchronism.

Did you know that the three branches of the Australian Defence Force have set precedence?

The Navy is the Senior Service, then follows Army. The Air Force just fly about, not following anything much. They're easily distracted and get the best rations. WWJD?
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:13 PM   #68
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Australian's all eat pies with sauce,
For breakfast lunch and tea,

I can't remember the rest but we used to sing it at school instead of our anthem.

I love the use of the word 'girt' in our anthem, I firmly believe that it should be used much more in society. eg: If you keep on working out at the gym, you will soon be girt by muscle.

I don't know why we chose to use the word girt since it doesn't really help rhyme any lines but I like it anyway.
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:37 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
And there's an England's flag in the same part of my state's flag as well, and our islands were also "discovered" by Captain Cook.

Our natives just had the good sense to eat him.
Unusual way to settle a disagreement though.

*Bugger, we can't agree, ah well lets spear him!*
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:38 PM   #70
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Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
Australian's all eat pies with sauce,
For breakfast lunch and tea,

I can't remember the rest but we used to sing it at school instead of our anthem.

I love the use of the word 'girt' in our anthem, I firmly believe that it should be used much more in society. eg: If you keep on working out at the gym, you will soon be girt by muscle.

I don't know why we chose to use the word girt since it doesn't really help rhyme any lines but I like it anyway.
"Girt" or "Gert" is a Somerset, England term for big, large, massive. etc. I believe we sent some of our best over to you in chains. Gert chains.
I use the term many times, daily. It irritates the well spoken. Of which I aint one of.
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:39 PM   #71
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[quote=proudnonbbeliever;4603871]
Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
Two islands actually. Your omission likely resulted from my error in the OP in failing to acknowledge our Southern Gem, the beautiful island state of Tasmania.


From my book-learning at school we was taught that tazzy is linked to the mainland by a land bridge that since the first fleet landed has gone under water. If i remember rightly tazzy was called van diemens land then.

edit - regardless, tazzy has awesome landscapes and best of all, the beer they make with the tazzy tiger on it, cascade i think, bloody bewdiful
The land bridge sank at the end of the last Ice Age, circa 10,000 BCE.
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i loves the little birdies they goes tweet tweet tweet hee hee i loves them they sings to each other tweet twet tweet hee hee i loves them they is so cute i love yje little birdies little birdies in the room when birfies sings ther is no gloom i lobes the little birdies they goess tweet tweet tweet hee hee hee i loves them they sings me to sleep sing me to slrrp now little birdies - The wisdom of Shemp.
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:39 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
DRIVING TIME = the amount of time spent actually behind the wheel of a car, doing the driving.
Yes. Nine days means 9 x 24 hours driving.

Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
To which must be added sleeping time, eating time, and time out of the car doing other things.
Nup. It's shift work. One sleeps and dreams of getting out of the car, the other eats and drives.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
I did not mean to imply that anybody could do a drive around the continent in nine days, nor that a visitor should plan a 10-day visit with the intention of doing any such thing. Mostly my question was geared towards finding out if a circumnavigation by road was possible.
Yes. My proviso about the wet season in the North remains though.

I believe Kotatsu has done a similar trip by road/air recently. I'll send a PM and ask K to drop by here, if possible. Another visitor's perspective may be useful to you.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
And I look forward to it.
This next website that I've linked to is run by the Koori. A visit will, I hope, show you the pride they have in their heritage, as well as provide a feel for how the Koori view their own place in modern Australia. I think it's as good a starting point as any, and may prompt you to ask specific questions. The forum will answer as best we can. The site will not present the totally positive spin that I do, and I'm sure you know the value of getting the whole story, warts and all.


Koori Mail


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
Again, I didn't mean to imply that the books were intended to be historically accurate, just were a source of what little tiny bit I know about Australian history. I will note the sources you quote here and elsewhere, and will try to catch up, at least a little...
Take your time. Life is too short to rush.


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
Gotcha.
Ow!


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
Early on, proudnonbeliever said:

Quote:
Australia, known as Straya (pronounced stray-ya) in the native tongue is a country, a continent and an island, all in one. Beat that.
I thought that was a literal name, but I see now that it's a way of saying the name of the country the way "real" Australians say it. (What can I say -- it was very early in my morning when I wrote that. I guess the sleep hadn't completely left my brain...)
Ooohhhhhh. I see. Straya is Australia in our sekrit language, Strine. The video on this page should be quite instructive.


The language of poetic deception


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
And I look forward to hearing those stories, as they develop.
Joy is in the ears that hear - Saltheart Foamfollower


Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
but...but...but... I thought we were supposed to ask questions and stuff. Don't you all want to increase your tourism?

The language of poetic deception. My language. You'll pick it up.

Ask as many questions as you like. I mean this sincerely. I'm not on my own here, and the forum will always answer you.


Cheers,

Dave


PS Hawaii looks fabulous.


Me want to go but bank say no.
Oh woe! No Pāhoehoe!
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Old 9th April 2009, 08:42 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by HawaiiBigSis View Post
And there's an England's flag in the same part of my state's flag as well, and our islands were also "discovered" by Captain Cook.

Our natives just had the good sense to eat him.

Eat? Cite?


You don't visit England very often, do you?


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Old 9th April 2009, 09:03 PM   #74
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Originally Posted by learner View Post
I believe we sent some of our best over to you in chains.
I was watching a doco the other night on the evolution of English and it said most, if not all Aussie words come from the English/Irish crims, or my ancestors, that were brought over here by Capt. Cookiemonster and his mates (to paraphrase).
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:12 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
Australian's all eat pies with sauce,
For breakfast lunch and tea,

I can't remember the rest but we used to sing it at school instead of our anthem.

Football, meat pies, kangaroos and holden cars.

It's jingoistic advertising fluff unworthy of a link. You've done well to forget it.


The Happy Little Vegemite Song

We're happy little Vegemites as bright as bright can be,

We all enjoy our Vegemite for breakfast, lunch and tea,

Our mummy says we're growing stronger every single week,

Because we love our Vegemite,
We all adore our Vegemite,

It puts a rose in every cheek!

Now THAT is an anthem.



Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
I love the use of the word 'girt' in our anthem, I firmly believe that it should be used much more in society. eg: If you keep on working out at the gym, you will soon be girt by muscle.

I believe Wildy and lionking will chip in on this one.



Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
I don't know why we chose to use the word girt since it doesn't really help rhyme any lines but I like it anyway.
ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

Australians all let us rejoice,
For we are young and free;
We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;
Our home is girt by sea;
Our land abounds in nature’s gifts
Of beauty rich and rare;
In history’s page, let every stage
Advance Australia Fair.

In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross
We’ll toil with hearts and hands;
To make this Commonwealth of ours
Renowned of all the lands;
For those who’ve come across the seas
We’ve boundless plains to share;
With courage let us all combine
To Advance Australia Fair.

In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

It'll do.
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:26 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Damien Evans View Post
Unusual way to settle a disagreement though.

*Bugger, we can't agree, ah well lets spear him!*

I don't think I can agree on a spear.


The Death of Captain James Cook RN FRS

Quote:
"Captain Cook was advanced a few paces before the Marines when they fired, the Stones flew as thick as hail which knocked the Lieut. down & as he was rising a fellow stuck him in the back with a Spear, however he recovered himself shot the Indian dead and escaped into the Water. Captain Cook was now the only Man on the Rock, he was seen walking down towards the Pinnace, holding his left hand against the Back of his head to guard it from the Stones & carrying his Musket under the other Arm. An Indian came running behind him, stopping once or twice as he advanced, as if he was afraid that he should turn round, then taking him unaware he sprung to him, knocked him on the back of his head with a large Club taken out of a fence, & instantly fled with the greatest precipitation; the blow made Captain Cook stagger two or three paces, he then fell on his hand & one knee & dropped his Musket, as he was rising another Indian came running to him & before he could recover himself from the Fall drew out an iron Dagger he concealed under his feathered Cloak & stuck it with all his force into the back of his Neck, which made Capt. Cook tumble into the Water in a kind of a bite by the side of the rock where the water is about knee deep; here he was followed by a croud of people who endeavoured to keep him under water, but struggling very strong with them he got his head up & looking towards the Pinnace which was not above a boat hook's Length from him waved his hands to them for Assistance, which it seems it was not in their Power to give".

"The Indians got him under water again but he disengaged himself & got his head up once more & not being able to swim he endeavoured to scramble on the Rock, when a fellow gave him a blow on the head with a large Club and he was seen alive no more."

Not speared.
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:30 PM   #77
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I'm enjoying reading this thread. But it is no wonder the rest of the world is confused about us.
Keep it up. Confusion is a good state. (Though mostly it is called Qld. )

Just for info back in '03 we rode a Honda Goldwing around Australia on Hwy 1 taking 26 days. That didn't give us much of a chance to see the scenery. For that you need several months.
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:30 PM   #78
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I have always had a bit of an attachment to this poem. I recall reading it years ago. In particular the last verse has always touched me




Our Flag
Author: Unknown
Our Flag wears the stars that blaze at night,
In our Southern skies of blue,
And a little old flag in the corner,
That’s part of our heritage too.

It’s for the English, the Scots and the Irish,
Who were sent to the ends of the earth,
The rogues and schemers, the doers and dreamers,
Who gave modern Australia its birth.

And you, who are shouting to change it,
You don’t seem to understand,
It’s the flag of our laws and our language,
Not the flag of a faraway land.

Though there are plenty of people who'll tell you,
How when Europe was plunged into night,
That little old flag in the corner,
Was their symbol of freedom and light.

It doesn’t mean we owe allegiance,
To a forgotten imperial dream,
We’ve the stars to show where we’re going,
And the old flag to show where we’ve been.

It’s only an old piece of bunting,
It’s only an old piece of rag,
But there are thousands who’ve died for its honour,
And shed of their blood for OUR FLAG.
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:37 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
I was watching a doco the other night on the evolution of English and it said most, if not all Aussie words come from the English/Irish crims, or my ancestors, . . .

What kind of galah would say that? Must be a proper drongo, that feller.


Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
. . .that were brought over here by Capt. Cookiemonster and his mates (to paraphrase).

Captain Arthur Phillip RN, to para-paraphrase. He gives his name to Port Phillip Bay, the Location of Melbourne, Victoria.
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Old 9th April 2009, 09:46 PM   #80
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Thank you all. That was totally sick, but I'm stuffed. Seeya 'round like a rissole.

Clintsc9, you are next in line for a response. Goldwings are kewl. That's not your response


Remember . . . The Aten shines on us all, eventually.
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