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Old 23rd April 2009, 01:39 AM   #281
Akhenaten
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Originally Posted by Jeff Corey View Post
We need to be armed with bat'leths, of course.

We were talking about this at the local and one guy was insisting that bats were rodents - flying mice. He didn't believe me when I told him they were more closely related to primates.

Bat'leths? Hija! Qa Tlho'.

How could I have left THEM out?


Anyway, maybe your friend was thinking of pigeons. They are obviously flying rodents, as classified by the great taxonomist, Woody Allen.



Qapla' batlh je,

Da'ave
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Old 23rd April 2009, 02:47 AM   #282
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More fine Australian cuisine.
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Old 23rd April 2009, 03:25 AM   #283
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Just in, from the New Zealand Herald:

Originally Posted by Isaac Davison

4:00AM Thursday Apr 23, 2009

Two bad-tempered Australians caused anxious moments for the crew of a Royal New Zealand Air Force Hercules.

Saltwater crocodiles Scar, from the Northern Territory, and Goldie, from Cairns in Queensland, were airborne on their way to a new life at Manukau's Butterfly Creek Zoo when they broke their head restraints, zoo general manager John Dowsett said.

"It was a bit fraught ... Two of them broke their head-ropes and began thrashing around. The plane was shaking. The pilot was turning and raising his eyebrows.


Well if the pilot raised his eyebrows, it was definitely serious.
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Old 23rd April 2009, 03:25 AM   #284
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Anzac biscuits, Tim Tams, lamingtons and meat pies are all pretty stereotypical but I can’t say I greatly miss any of these. A Paul’s iced coffee might make the list – The uncited claim on Wikipedia that it’s the second most popular beverage in Darwin, after beer could well be true.

What I really miss is the variety of cuisines available back home. When you want to eat out there is so much choice – a benefit of our multicultural society. The range of ingredients in the supermarket reflects people’s interest in reproducing and combining international flavours in their own kitchens. Then there is that fine local produce to work with. Aussie food is great but I don’t think we have had enough time to develop any strong defining characteristics and maybe that’s a good thing.
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Old 23rd April 2009, 03:38 AM   #285
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Aren't you forgetting somethink?http://blogs.smh.com.au/lifestyle/al...s/vegemite.jpg
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Old 23rd April 2009, 05:09 AM   #286
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Out west from Dalby on some of the untouched land it is pitted with "melon holes" amongst the scrub. They are depressions from 10 ft to 50 and about 2-4 foot deep,in wet times they fill up, breeding mozzies. They often are so close it's hard to drive between and the pigs love them. Dozers are used and land graders to level the paddocks,roos by the thousands. Our gov gives roo shooters only so many tags to cull - worked out from Canberra and once they have quota filled too bad. Then the owner has to illegally cull and leave them to rot. The drought has killed millions but they soon breed up. We were in so many mozzies it was hard to see the x hairs in the evening clearly yet the animals and birds put up with it. In some spots you would die overnight without protection. Now I know I'm putting a lot on Dave to detail and explain, lucky the nights are getting longer. I have no idea how all the hollows form in flat country that would bog a duck when it rains. Thanks to Mr Toyota we could get out. Also thousands of whistler ducks live in that area. Some odd holes at Bunderberg in hard conglormite called "The Mystery Craters" are worth a mention too.
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Old 23rd April 2009, 05:49 AM   #287
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Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post
Anzac biscuits, Tim Tams, lamingtons and meat pies are all pretty stereotypical but I can’t say I greatly miss any of these. A Paul’s iced coffee might make the list – The uncited claim on Wikipedia that it’s the second most popular beverage in Darwin, after beer could well be true.


I'll back up the 'pedia on this one from memory and personal experience. Paul's iced coffee is the only refreshing thing in the Territory that tastes even remotely like its southern counterpart.

The water is dreadful, and it's too hot for coffee or tea. GI cordial is good, but the ants get in it. The milk is awful too, because there aren't many dairy cows up there, so it's largely reconstituted from powder. Iced coffee does the best job of masking the taste.

I will also vouch for beer being used as a substitute for milk on one's cornflakes in the morning. Room temperature and flattish works best and it really does taste better than the moo juice. Also saves wasting the dregs from the previous evening.



Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post

What I really miss is the variety of cuisines available back home. When you want to eat out there is so much choice – a benefit of our multicultural society. The range of ingredients in the supermarket reflects people’s interest in reproducing and combining international flavours in their own kitchens. Then there is that fine local produce to work with. Aussie food is great but I don’t think we have had enough time to develop any strong defining characteristics and maybe that’s a good thing.


I'm sure we're spoiled that way. Melbourne, to name one place, has an incredible range of options available. I'd love to eat my way up Sydney Road one lifetime. Darwin seems to be in another country altogether, foodwise, and the Asian food there is the best I've had, although I haven't made it to the Flower Drum yet.

While it's true that we don't have a national cuisine, if we were to vote for a national dish then I'd go for Chilli Mud Crab. It features at a lot of Asian restaurants in the Valley in Brisvegas, and it's to die for.


Cheers.

I'll think of you on Saturday.


Dave
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Old 23rd April 2009, 05:59 AM   #288
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Originally Posted by Jeff Corey View Post

Well, yes, but girls aren't usually considered to be "cuisine".

Oh wait . . . spread it all over . . . now I see. Yeah, I'd eat that.

Geez I'm a drongo sometimes, fair dinkum.


No wukkers Dude,

Dave
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Old 23rd April 2009, 06:09 AM   #289
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@ Old Bob

I'm a couple of stories behind you, but nobody else will get a word in edgewise if I don't shut up a bit. We'll get back to Cooktown and mysterious holes on the Western Downs after a bit of a smoko.




Cheers Mate,

Dave
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Old 23rd April 2009, 04:03 PM   #290
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Ok Dave, I must have too much time on my hands, will also shut up for awhile. Thinking of going for a drive south before it gets too cold at Porepunkah. (NE. Vic)
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Old 24th April 2009, 12:33 AM   #291
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They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.



Lest we forget
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Old 24th April 2009, 01:08 AM   #292
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Originally Posted by Jeff Corey View Post
It’s probably blasphemy in this thread, but I have never liked the stuff (to be clear, I'm talking about vegimite).

Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
I'm sure we're spoiled that way. Melbourne, to name one place, has an incredible range of options available. I'd love to eat my way up Sydney Road one lifetime. Darwin seems to be in another country altogether, foodwise, and the Asian food there is the best I've had, although I haven't made it to the Flower Drum yet.

While it's true that we don't have a national cuisine, if we were to vote for a national dish then I'd go for Chilli Mud Crab. It features at a lot of Asian restaurants in the Valley in Brisvegas, and it's to die for.
Cheers.
I'll think of you on Saturday.

Dave
Thanks mate, I’ll get to watch some of the various dawn services on the news and try to follow my beloved Magpies in the Anzac Day match.
I might have to fire up Google Earth for a virtual trip up Sydney road and through the Valley. West End in Brisvegas also had a few good places to eat out and seemed to be developing. The Flower Drum certainly rings a bell but I don’t think I’ve tried there either. Chilli Mud Crab sounds the go or some lovely fresh Tiger prawns.

John
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Old 26th April 2009, 08:52 AM   #293
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
That is a cool website - I was interested under the regional entries, for the North Coast of NSW - "Not sighted off Nobbies" was not mentioned. It is one of the most enigmatic of sayings. Seemingly connected to Nobbies headland in Newcastle. But who they were looking for or who was doing the looking has never been explained.

I asked Mum, who spent many of her younger years in Newcastle during the 1930s and 40s, and scored some information. This is what she says:

Nobbies Headland (and accompanying beach) was where the rougher elements of the Castle used to go to sort out their differences "man-to-man". Because this was seen as a reasonable social pressure valve, the police were willing to turn a blind eye to the rough-housing, as long as it wasn't seen off Nobbies.

It's an anecdote, but I like it, and I hardly ever believe Mum's stories.


Cheers,

Dave
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Old 26th April 2009, 09:19 AM   #294
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Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post

It’s probably blasphemy in this thread, but I have never liked the stuff (to be clear, I'm talking about vegimite).

I hated it when I was a kid, and so did my Dad. I only developed a taste for it bcause my wife absolutely loved it, and all the other spreads in the house ended up with enough Vegemite in them that they all tased like it too. At some point I became sick of the taste of Vegemite honey and took the path of least resistance. Now I enjoy it every day.

She used to like ½ Vegemite and ½ strawberry jam on her toast, which tastes exactly as bad as it sounds, for my money.



Originally Posted by Sideroxylon View Post

Thanks mate, I’ll get to watch some of the various dawn services on the news and try to follow my beloved Magpies in the Anzac Day match.
I might have to fire up Google Earth for a virtual trip up Sydney road and through the Valley. West End in Brisvegas also had a few good places to eat out and seemed to be developing. The Flower Drum certainly rings a bell but I don’t think I’ve tried there either. Chilli Mud Crab sounds the go or some lovely fresh Tiger prawns.

John

I had a pretty quiet day. I'm in a tiny little town and I think everyone attends the dawn service in larger places like Kilmore and Seymour, so I was on my pat this year, and I thought it worked out quite well. I stayed for a couple of hours, talkin' to the Diggers, and didn't have to listen to any god-bothery stuff. As long as someone in town showed up to remember, I'm content, and I have a few years left in me yet, so all's well.

Yeah, the West End is grouse, and probably safer to walk around in than the Valley. Tiger prawns yeah! Yummo.

The Flower Drum is a really expensive Chinese restaurant in Melbourne. It seems a waste to go on my own, so I'm hoping to make a friend one day.


Cheers,

Dave
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Old 26th April 2009, 09:28 AM   #295
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Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post
Ok Dave, I must have too much time on my hands, will also shut up for awhile. Thinking of going for a drive south before it gets too cold at Porepunkah. (NE. Vic)



We could both talk the legs off an iron pot from time to time. Gives the others something to look at and point, so we're doing OK.


Porepunkah would have been beautiful last week, (how many times do you hear that? ) but the first of the Winter's cold fronts have arrived, and it's freezing. Falls Creek had 20cm of snow last night. Brrr.


Don't you dare come to Victoria without us arranging a little drinky.
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Old 30th April 2009, 03:03 AM   #296
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
I pick up and recycle words all the time, and this is a classic example. I picked up "bugger" (no sexual overtones, gentle foreign readers) from the TV ads for Toyota, featuring the talking Blue Heeler, and started using it as a replacement for "bummer" which I'd earlier picked up from American TV.

It's not a Blue Heeler, it's a New Zealand Huntaway (it's a New Zealand commercial).
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Old 30th April 2009, 03:19 AM   #297
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Well I just have to bow to a New Zealander's superior knowledge of buggery.
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Old 30th April 2009, 03:24 AM   #298
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
I must confess that I have been speaking out of turn on behalf of the Kiwis. I hope a son or daughter of Aotearoa will enlighten us all.

I just barely came into this world early enough to have the opportunity to speak to a few WWI veterans. I think the thoughts you've all reflected are much in keeping with what the Kiwi soldiers were feeling and thinking.

Acclaimed New Zealand writer Maurice Shadbolt (not to be confused with his odd politician brother Tim Shadbolt) interviewed a great number of Kiwi veterans and assembled their stories in his work Voices from Gallipoli, a recommended read.

He used these stories as the basis for his moving play Once On Chunuk Bair, recounting the Wellington Battalion's desperate battle to seize and hold one of two vital positions during the Allied break out.

Tragically after repulsing wave after wave of Turkish counter attacks, British ships shelled the New Zealand positions, believing that there was no way there could still be any allies left alive on the peak. The Wellington Battalion commander - Lt Col William Malone (who defied Godley's insane order to assault in broad daylight and instead took the peak virtually unopposed at night) was killed in the shelling. His legacy remains, however; the ceremonial dress hat of the NZ Army (known as the "lemon squeezer") was created by Malone, inspired by the shape of Mt Taranaki.

Of the 760 men of the Wellington Battalion who captured Chunuk Bair, only 49 would ever come back down.
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Old 30th April 2009, 03:31 AM   #299
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Originally Posted by lionking View Post
Well I just have to bow to a New Zealander's superior knowledge of buggery.
Touché
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Old 30th April 2009, 04:53 AM   #300
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
It's not a Blue Heeler, it's a New Zealand Huntaway (it's a New Zealand commercial).

Damn! Why don't I check things better?

Thanks for the heads-up mate. I have no idea why I thought it was a Blue Heeler. Great ads, though, so well done Kiwis.

New Zealand Huntaway


©Wikipedia


Originally Posted by lionking View Post
Well I just have to bow to a New Zealander's superior knowledge of buggery.



Cheers fellers,

Dave
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Old 30th April 2009, 05:16 AM   #301
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
I just barely came into this world early enough to have the opportunity to speak to a few WWI veterans. I think the thoughts you've all reflected are much in keeping with what the Kiwi soldiers were feeling and thinking.

Acclaimed New Zealand writer Maurice Shadbolt (not to be confused with his odd politician brother Tim Shadbolt) interviewed a great number of Kiwi veterans and assembled their stories in his work Voices from Gallipoli, a recommended read.

He used these stories as the basis for his moving play Once On Chunuk Bair, recounting the Wellington Battalion's desperate battle to seize and hold one of two vital positions during the Allied break out.

Tragically after repulsing wave after wave of Turkish counter attacks, British ships shelled the New Zealand positions, believing that there was no way there could still be any allies left alive on the peak. The Wellington Battalion commander - Lt Col William Malone (who defied Godley's insane order to assault in broad daylight and instead took the peak virtually unopposed at night) was killed in the shelling. His legacy remains, however; the ceremonial dress hat of the NZ Army (known as the "lemon squeezer") was created by Malone, inspired by the shape of Mt Taranaki.

Of the 760 men of the Wellington Battalion who captured Chunuk Bair, only 49 would ever come back down.




This Australian will never forget his brave New Zealand allies. Thank you for this story and its references; I'm looking forward to some reading.

I can't believe I've never thought to enquire about those hats, and now I know anyway. Woot! Serendipity rocks! Thank you also for that story.


We can haz a New Zealand thread? My knowledge is sadly lacking and I'd love to learn more. Besides, seeing Australia and New Zealand blitzing the opposition in HL&A would be beaut.


Cheers,

Dave
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Old 30th April 2009, 06:23 AM   #302
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
He used these stories as the basis for his moving play Once On Chunuk Bair, recounting the Wellington Battalion's desperate battle to seize and hold one of two vital positions during the Allied break out.
Is that the battle that has the legend of the cloud associated with it. There was an "Angels Of The Mons" story attached to an assualt untaken by the Wellington Battallion that says in the heat of the fighting a cloud came down for a few minutes, when it lifted again all the men where gone.
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Old 30th April 2009, 06:29 AM   #303
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
This Australian will never forget his brave New Zealand allies. Thank you for this story and its references; I'm looking forward to some reading.
There was a saying that came into being later in the war as Australian and New Zealand forces were increasingly used as shock troop. The saying was interchangable depending who undertook the orginal assault

"If a Kiwi can take it, and Australian can hold it"

Or the reverse

"If an Australian can take it, A Kiwi can hold it"
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Old 30th April 2009, 06:30 AM   #304
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Originally Posted by Old Bob View Post

Also the locals guided us to the most beautiful waterfall and large rock pool hidden in the scrub behind Cooktown. A lovely place in winter; sandfly city in the wet season. It's a national park that has cassowaries with legs like footballers and a few snakes.


Did it look like this?



©Cook Shire Council

If I recall correctly, this is in Black Mountain National Park, where the spooky mountain is that we discussed earlier. That may even be it in the background, but I'm not sure. We used this for a swimming hole when I was working up in Cooktown on a few occasions, since the area around the the airfield where we were based is teeming with salties.

Here are some pics of Pharaoh playing soldiers at Cooktown in 1978.



Changing a donc on Pilatus Porter A14-703. Sweetest. Aeroplane. Ever.





Corporal Dave is on the right in both photos, going flat out like a lizard drinking.


Cooktown is of course named after Captain James Cook RN FRS who almost came to a sticky end on the Great Barrier Reef offshore from its present location.

In the middle of the night of June 11, 1770, Cook's ship, Endeavour, struck the reef 39 km (24 mi) off the coast and was holed. After lightening the ship by throwing overboard about 50 tons of stuff, including cannons, they made it to the coast, but it took them until 17 June to get across the bar and beach the ship for repairs.

The reef where the ship struck and the River in whose mouth the ship was careened are both named for Endeavour.

Luckily for us, the locals were able to photograph Endeavour as she was leaving.


©Wikipedia

Wait . . . what? . . ?eleven?!

More of the story of the Endeavour can be read here, including more details of her stop-over(s) in Cooktown.


Cooktown is also home to Queensland's State Flower, the Cooktown Orchid Dendrobium phalaenopsis. I've tried and failed repeatedly to grow these in Pi-Broadford. Too cold.


©Wikipedia


Finally, as Bob points out, Cooktown is in Cassowary country.


©Cairns Unlimited


Cheers eh,

Dave
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Old 30th April 2009, 06:42 AM   #305
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
There was a saying that came into being later in the war as Australian and New Zealand forces were increasingly used as shock troop. The saying was interchangable depending who undertook the orginal assault

"If a Kiwi can take it, an Australian can hold it"

Or the reverse

"If an Australian can take it, A Kiwi can hold it"

[gung-ho]The Taliban may shortly be able to update us on this. They sure as shootin' ain't Johnny Turk, and we're on their case.[/gung-ho]


Cheers mate,

Dave
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Old 30th April 2009, 07:02 AM   #306
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Originally Posted by Akhenaten View Post
[gung-ho]The Taliban may shortly be able to update us on this. They sure as shootin' ain't Johhny Turk, and we're on their case.[/gung-ho]


Cheers mate,

Dave
I live near a US Iraq veteran. His only comment about Australian combat troops in that war was "They are crazy"

He was involved in a support role to clean out a town, that was supposed to be heavily defended. The operation was expected to go for about four hours

The Australians cleaned to town out in 25 minutes and captured something like 90 defenders. He said the particular units theme song was ACDCs "Dirty Deeds" lol

Hopefully the Taliban will be so over awed by the Australian troops courage training and sheer ability, they drop their weapons and surrender on sight. That way there is a better chance no one is going to get hurt
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Old 30th April 2009, 07:14 AM   #307
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
Hopefully the Taliban will be so over awed by the Australian troops courage training and sheer ability, they drop their weapons and surrender on sight. That way there is a better chance no one is going to get hurt
I've been toying with the idea of joining the Army and after reading those few brief paragraphs, I think I might. There are no other jobs around that I'm qualified for at the moment so why not, I've always wanted to so as Lawrence Lueng would say, "Choose your own adventure!"
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Old 30th April 2009, 07:25 AM   #308
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Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
I've been toying with the idea of joining the Army and after reading those few brief paragraphs, I think I might. There are no other jobs around that I'm qualified for at the moment so why not, I've always wanted to so as Lawrence Lueng would say, "Choose your own adventure!"
I am not sure what country you are from, but I believe the Australian government is expanding their military budget. Although I have never served myself, I dont think I would be out of order suggesting there are a lot worse ways to spend your time than military service.
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Old 30th April 2009, 07:44 AM   #309
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Originally Posted by Altered Statesman View Post
I've been toying with the idea of joining the Army and after reading those few brief paragraphs, I think I might. There are no other jobs around that I'm qualified for at the moment so why not, I've always wanted to so as Lawrence Lueng would say, "Choose your own adventure!"

It's a great idea, and you won't regret it. The Service will train and qualify you, so when you've had enough of it you'll have a whole new skill set with which to set yourself up in civvy life.

Don't forget the Navy and Air Force, although obviously the Army is a far better choice if you ask me.


Please feel free to ask me any questions you have about the ARA.


Cheers,

Dave
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Last edited by Akhenaten; 30th April 2009 at 07:46 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 30th April 2009, 10:03 AM   #310
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Speaking of Cooktown . . .


I hope I can be indulged with a bit of off-topicness. It's just a quick anecdote that I was reminded of as I was writing my earlier post. It's a lighter side of being teh Soldier.


UFOs Sighted at Cooktown


The aircraft that I posted photos of earlier were involved, amongst other things, in a flare dropping trial. The flares were metal cylinders about a metre long and about 20 cm in diameter, and yielded one million candlepower each (I have no idea what that is in the new money). Before illumination the flare deployed a parachute which held it aloft for the two minute burn time.

The flare had two triggering mechanisms, connected in parallel, one a timer and one an altitude sensor. Both were pre-settable.

The trial consisted of dropping these things out of a newly-designed dispenser which we fitted over the trapdoor in the floor of the Porter's cargo space. The dispenser held 16 flares at a time, and when loaded, the top of each flare ingressed about ½ its length into the cabin. A spring and gravity provided the means of "launching", with the cables from the two arming plugs on each flare being attached to a clip on the launcher, such that the plugs were pulled out as the flare dropped away from the aircraft.

In theory.

Unfortunately the sheet-metal workers scientists who threw together designed the launcher made it too flimsy, and often when a flare was dropped the dispenser would partially give way where the arming cables were attached to it. This absorbed enough energy that only one plug would be dislodged, and the flare would remain suspended about two feet below the fuselage. If it was the altitude-arming plug, there was plenty of time to produce an "engineering solution", as long as the airframe driver stayed straight and level.

But if it was the timer plug that went, then something bad was going to happen Real Soon. Because of this little quirk, the flight trials team consisted of three aircraft fitters kneeling around the dispenser, each armed with a pair of wire cutters on a wrist strap. The game was to see if anyone could reach down through the trapdoor and cut the remaining cable before things lit up a bit. The novelty was mainly in the first time it happened, when there was only one pair of cutters and six eager hands, but it worked out OK, I'm happily here to report.

With practice, the flares could be cut away in time that the altitude switch generally set them off a thousand feet below us.

So, there's the situation.

Now for the execution.

We would cruise in a straight line at 8000 feet over the sea and drop the flares every 30 seconds or so, hopefully leaving a nice neat line of brightness behind us. The aforementioned "hangers", however, introduced occasional brilliant streaks as they plummeted into the water. The timer switch was the one that deployed the parachute, so if that was the cable you cut, a "hanger" became a "bomb". I'm sure the sight this presented from the ground can be imagined.

We did one run in the middle of the afternoon and another that night, and next morning the Whiskey Tango Foxtrot brigade came out from Cooktown. They didn't want to know what we were up to; they wanted to know if we'd seen the UFOs.

A quick Q & A tour was arranged in exchange for a barbie and piss-up the next day, and there was much happiness.


Cheers,

"Bomber" Dave
173 General Support Squadron
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Old 4th May 2009, 01:55 AM   #311
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
Is that the battle that has the legend of the cloud associated with it. There was an "Angels Of The Mons" story attached to an assualt untaken by the Wellington Battallion that says in the heat of the fighting a cloud came down for a few minutes, when it lifted again all the men where gone.

I've never heard that particular tale, but it would fit the basic story. The "cloud" would of course be the smoke and dust from the naval barrage!
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Old 4th May 2009, 02:19 AM   #312
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
There was a saying that came into being later in the war as Australian and New Zealand forces were increasingly used as shock troop. The saying was interchangable depending who undertook the orginal assault

"If a Kiwi can take it, and Australian can hold it"

Or the reverse

"If an Australian can take it, A Kiwi can hold it"


Aye, I've oft heard it said, though always it was the Aussies who could take any positions, and the Kiwis who could hold any position. You're right though, that it could easily be reversed.

This weekend I went down to Wellington, and stopped in at the New Zealand National Army Museum on the way. There was a special exhibit on, dealing with the last 100 days of WWI and the feats of the New Zealand Division, culminating with our liberation of Le Quesnoy, and the unique bond that has grown between France and NZ as a result of that battle.

I was once again reminded of the incredible efforts and courage of those who fought, and of the true value in what they did.

Le Quesnoy was an old fortified French medieval town, a formidable position in a classic star pattern with triple walls, a wide moat, and fortified islands in the moat, with only a narrow lane linking the town to land. During WWI the Germans occupied and fortified the town, and treated the inhabitants harshly.

The Kiwis were given the task of defeating the Germans as the position was a strong point in the German line. Typically the approach was to flatten the entire town with artillery and then march in - check some before and after photos of Passchendaele to see what this did to the town.

The New Zealanders, however, decided that there were many civilians in the town, and therefore they would take it by infantry assault and forgo the artillery barrage. They attacked with scaling ladders, literally climbing the walls. However the ladders were too short to reach the top of the last wall from the moat level.

One courageous soldiers by the name of LT Leslie Averill led a single section of soldiers across a narrow bridge to a tiny ledge part way up the wall, and from there the scaling ladder could reach the top. Averill climbed to the top, engaging the Germans and driving off the nearest defenders. The rest of the section followed suite, and by the time the heavy British forces entered the town from the opposite side and reached the town square, the German garrison had already surrendered to the New Zealanders.

The people of Le Quesnoy never refer to November 4th as the day of their Liberation. Rather they call it the day of their Deliverance.

Now, Le Quesnoy is the only place in France that commemorates ANZAC Day, and many place names, street names, etc in the town have been renamed after New Zealanders and aspects of New Zealand, including the primary school (named after Averill) where New Zealand culture is a part of their curriculum.

Averill had already earned a Military Cross for his deeds at the crucial Battle of Bapaume, but being instrumental in two of the key achievements of the New Zealand Division during WWI was not enough for him - after the war he qualified as a doctor and was eventually appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George for his contribution to Medicine and community.

In 1968 the town of Le Quesnoy appointed him Citoyen d'honneur, and in 1973 the government of France appointed him a chevalier de la Légion d'honneur.
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Old 4th May 2009, 02:35 AM   #313
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Great story gumboot. I will have to spend more time reading about the original ANZACS. In an earlier thread I mentioned that my grandfather was in the Lighthorse Brigade, but I am seriously ignorant of this part of our history, unlike Akhenaten.
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Old 5th May 2009, 06:18 AM   #314
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
I've never heard that particular tale, but it would fit the basic story. The "cloud" would of course be the smoke and dust from the naval barrage!
Here is an overview of the legend. In this one it is the Norfolk division with a detachment of New Zealand sappers. Like the Angel Of The Mons, the details change with every telling lol

http://www.drdavidclarke.co.uk/vanbat.htm
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Old 5th May 2009, 06:29 AM   #315
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
Now, Le Quesnoy is the only place in France that commemorates ANZAC Day, and many place names, street names, etc in the town have been renamed after New Zealanders and aspects of New Zealand, including the primary school (named after Averill) where New Zealand culture is a part of their curriculum.
There was a discussion about this a few years ago, and I am pleased to say that this is changing. While Galipoli has a massive emotional under current, the ANZACs operated with distinction on the Western Front for a number of years

As a consequence Dawn Services are now held or being organised in the future for a number of significant sites across France.

There are also a couple of towns that do much the same as LeQuesnoy for Australias. Streets have Australian reference, there is a small Australian museum in one of the towns, and the school kids learn about Australia

I mention this because I often here negative comments about the French in a number of areas, but one thing you can really say about them. They dont forget when you have helped them out
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Old 5th May 2009, 03:57 PM   #316
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Originally Posted by MG1962 View Post
I mention this because I often here negative comments about the French in a number of areas, but one thing you can really say about them. They dont forget when you have helped them out

Aye, very true. Another people that are similar are the Greeks. To this day, they have not forgotten that the ANZACs died in a futile attempt to protect Greece from the Germans.

A work colleague of my father's went to Greece to visit the places his father had fought. Once the locals discovered he was the son of an ANZAC that fought the defense of Greece, there was nothing they couldn't do for him. He was not allowed to pay for anything at all.
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Old 9th May 2009, 08:24 AM   #317
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
Aye, I've oft heard it said, though always it was the Aussies who could take any positions, and the Kiwis who could hold any position. You're right though, that it could easily be reversed.

This weekend I went down to Wellington, and stopped in at the New Zealand National Army Museum on the way. There was a special exhibit on, dealing with the last 100 days of WWI and the feats of the New Zealand Division, culminating with our liberation of Le Quesnoy, and the unique bond that has grown between France and NZ as a result of that battle.

I was once again reminded of the incredible efforts and courage of those who fought, and of the true value in what they did.

Le Quesnoy was an old fortified French medieval town, a formidable position in a classic star pattern with triple walls, a wide moat, and fortified islands in the moat, with only a narrow lane linking the town to land. During WWI the Germans occupied and fortified the town, and treated the inhabitants harshly.

The Kiwis were given the task of defeating the Germans as the position was a strong point in the German line. Typically the approach was to flatten the entire town with artillery and then march in - check some before and after photos of Passchendaele to see what this did to the town.

The New Zealanders, however, decided that there were many civilians in the town, and therefore they would take it by infantry assault and forgo the artillery barrage. They attacked with scaling ladders, literally climbing the walls. However the ladders were too short to reach the top of the last wall from the moat level.

One courageous soldiers by the name of LT Leslie Averill led a single section of soldiers across a narrow bridge to a tiny ledge part way up the wall, and from there the scaling ladder could reach the top. Averill climbed to the top, engaging the Germans and driving off the nearest defenders. The rest of the section followed suite, and by the time the heavy British forces entered the town from the opposite side and reached the town square, the German garrison had already surrendered to the New Zealanders.

The people of Le Quesnoy never refer to November 4th as the day of their Liberation. Rather they call it the day of their Deliverance.

Now, Le Quesnoy is the only place in France that commemorates ANZAC Day, and many place names, street names, etc in the town have been renamed after New Zealanders and aspects of New Zealand, including the primary school (named after Averill) where New Zealand culture is a part of their curriculum.


Averill had already earned a Military Cross for his deeds at the crucial Battle of Bapaume, but being instrumental in two of the key achievements of the New Zealand Division during WWI was not enough for him - after the war he qualified as a doctor and was eventually appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George for his contribution to Medicine and community.

In 1968 the town of Le Quesnoy appointed him Citoyen d'honneur, and in 1973 the government of France appointed him a chevalier de la Légion d'honneur.
You've not heard of recent developments in Villers-Bretonneaux I see.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villers-Bretonneux

They also had a dawn service this year, so it looks as though it will become permanent, as it should be.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_...ers-Bretonneux
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Old 7th June 2009, 04:19 AM   #318
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What's happened? without Akhenaten imput this thread is dying and we haven't touched much of Australia. Many of the posters must have interesting places to talk about that the tourist never see.
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Old 7th June 2009, 04:23 AM   #319
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Whats happened? Without Akhenaten imput this thread is dying. Many posters must have interesting places to talk about that the tourist never see.
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Old 12th June 2009, 06:11 PM   #320
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Man bitten by a deadly snake at Myer department store in the middle of the CBD.

http://www.theage.com.au/national/lu...0612-c5iw.html

Quote:
The man was taken to St Vincent's Hospital, where a swab test confirmed he had been bitten by a brown snake, one of the deadliest snakes in the world and the leading cause of snakebite deaths in Australia.
But a hospital spokesman said the snake's highly-toxic venom had not entered the man's bloodstream. He remained in a stable condition, but would be kept in hospital overnight for observation.
"He is as happy as Larry,'' said the spokesman.

Fortunately, Larry is renowned for being a very happy person.
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