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Old 20th October 2005, 07:41 AM   #41
rebecca
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What's so bad about bike helmets? I like bike helmets. I like my derby helmet even better, and often wear it on my bike -- it's a skate style with radioactive symbol stickers on each side.

After getting knocked off my bike, I like my helmet even more.

edited to add: but I don't think helmets should be mandatory. People should be free to die in whatever dumbass way they'd like.
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Old 20th October 2005, 08:11 AM   #42
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Talking

Originally Posted by TragicMonkey View Post
I thought it was normal to have a bunch of injuries in childhood? Teaches you caution in later life. I had three concussions, two sets of scalp stitches, and a broken arm before age 11. Always falling down stairs, falling down hillsides, falling over objects, falling from slides, falling from swings. I even successfully lobbied for bunkbeds, and fell off them.
Now I understand your name!

This thread brings up so many things I have thought about - being the difference of growing up when I did (60s and 70s), and growing up now. Yes, we kids use to go outside to play, and we were healthy, today it's hard to get kids away from the computer or any other game system, and heaven forbid if they should get hurt. I've known many young parents who feared taking their kids for stitches because they didn't want anybody accusing them of child abuse!
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Old 20th October 2005, 08:21 AM   #43
Melendwyr
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Wearing a helmet is just about the only sensible thing our hyper-safety-conscious society's mandated. It cuts down on traumatic brain injuries significantly.

Luke T. probably shouldn't bother, but everyone else really should wear helmets on bicycles.
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Old 20th October 2005, 08:30 AM   #44
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I wasn't that injury-prone myself (more collateral-damage-to-others prone), but I did tend to attract large, heavy things to my skull. A favorite pasttime is letting people try to guess sporting equipment that hasn't made violent contact with my head. My parents stopped taking me to the hospital for skull x-rays after I was two or three. They would just check my pupils and go on with life. I also built bombs, fell out of trees, jumped bicycles, and all the normal kid stuff. My dad once handed me two wires coming out of a box that I subsequently discovered to be a hand-crank telephone (essentially, a small generator). After three or so shocks (I still trusted my father at that point), he handed me the box and told me to go get the rest of the neighborhood kids.

My parents were very much of the "Is it life threatening? No? Have at it." school of parenting. They also very much didn't like busybodies in the neighborhood. CPS actually tried to remove my older brother from the home because he consistently had some very nasty forearm bruises. This got all the way to court, where his football coach got up and basically said, "He plays offensive line, you idiots." That was the end of that. Hell, my brother even played an entire game with a broken arm. He broke it in the first quarter, but because it was contained by a stretchy, slip-on forearm pad, it didn't move around. He didn't mention that it was broken after the play, and went back in for the rest of the game. It was only noticed afterward when they had to cut the pad off his arm because it was so swollen.

Bottom line, kids have to be kids. My own son is a walking whirlwind of destruction and minor injury. When he bops his skull, we all just laugh and say "Bonk!" (he's recently two). If it's minor, that distracts him and he goes on. If it's enough to hurt past the distraction, then we check him out. So far, it's working rather well.

Edited for spelling.
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Old 20th October 2005, 09:06 AM   #45
pgwenthold
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Originally Posted by Luke T. View Post
I can't remember who it was, but I was talking with someone about the fact that in my state, every kid under 16 has to wear a helmet when riding a bike. At some point, I mentioned that I was glad I was over 16 and would not wear a helmet. Whoever it was that was talking to me said, "But you have to set an example for the kids." I said, "Exactly."
I have a lot of scars from bike crashes. I was pretty good at crashing the thing, and it wasn't even when we'd set up ramps and do jumps. I just crashed a lot. I tended to get out of control a lot. It was fun.
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Old 20th October 2005, 09:21 AM   #46
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This is an old thread, and I don't know if I brought this up before, but there is something that bothers me about this whole discussion, and I'll demonstrate it with a different example:

I one time went to that classmates.com website, and was reading the forum section for my old high school. Not much there, of course, but someone (who I vaguely knew, but was a few years older than me) was talking about memories from school. And the one memory they brought up was the time the teacher caught them drinking in the bathroom. Their punishment was detention. The comment was, "Man, it would be a lot worse than that today."

Why would the response so different today? It's because the parents are the ones who insist on it. The parents want the school to crack down more heavily on these types of infractions, and control their kids behavior.

Now, here's the thing. This comment was by someone a couple years older than me, and I have been out of high school for 20 years. That means this person is out for a little more than that, and right at the age of where they would have kids in school at this time. Therefore, this new attitude against such behavior is coming from the exact people who are laughing about doing this stuff when they were in school.

It's not so funny though when their kids do it, I guess.

Same applies here. Playground injuries were a big part of growing up when I was kid. They were something you encountered, and you put up with them. Nowadays, parents fear them. Why?
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Old 20th October 2005, 10:02 AM   #47
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Quote:
Luke T.
I can't remember who it was, but I was talking with someone about the fact that in my state, every kid under 16 has to wear a helmet when riding a bike. At some point, I mentioned that I was glad I was over 16 and would not wear a helmet. Whoever it was that was talking to me said, "But you have to set an example for the kids." I said, "Exactly."
Brillaint. I will have to rembember that.

On a side note, it is illegal for adults to ride without a helmet in my city.

CBL
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Old 20th October 2005, 10:27 AM   #48
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Now that I've got my own 6 year-old (recently adopted!), I'm amazed what hurts and what doesn't. Example - pinching finger in seat belt, or taking a full body slide into the tub - no problem. Hangnail? Massive complaints. Things she does that cause pain, she just deals with (and doesn't do them again!!). I know that she will never try a piroutte in the shower again - cause it hurts when you bonk your head on the side of the tub. Things that just happen are the source of much complaint.

I can't believe that insulating everything gives you a survivor. Risk assessment via feeling a little pain is necessary. She doesn't know how to swim (yet) so we explained why she was not allowed in the pool without Mom or Dad. Then we let her go under for 3 seconds to understand that drowning is a bad thing. She is now hell bent on learning to swim the right way. Unlike the neighbor's kid who believes that a rubber ring makes her invincible. I know which kid is likelier to drown.

My two cents.
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Old 20th October 2005, 10:42 AM   #49
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What BS. I'm glad I had a childhood without all that close-to-the-ground rounded off plastic crap. When I was three-four years old I'd climb 50-70ft up into trees. I shot steel ball bearings using a high powered slingshot at age five-six. I went off into the woods by myself and climbed vines and trees at seven. I lit crap on fire. My brother showed me how to make a blow torch from a can of hair spray. I'd carry a, giant compared to my size, army knife around; a K-bar like thing. I played in the mud. I played in chicken houses. I climbed grain silos' ladders. I rode my bike, and still do, without a helment. I went cliff rapeling, the cliff was about seventy feet high, at age five-six. I went snow skiing off by myself; I'd race down the mountain at what must have been 30-50mph. I got tore the hell up in bike wrecks. I got burned, poked, splinters in my skin, cut, scraped, court burned, rocks stuck in my skin, ticks, poison ivy etc. I'd trade none of those possitive memories back to have not had the pain that sometimes went with it. How old am I, 20. *sigh* The generation just below me are a bunch of pansies that haven't lived.
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Old 20th October 2005, 12:43 PM   #50
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I don't think the silliness of things like kids not being allowed to run in a playground, play on the monkey bars, etc. has to do with a 'nanny state' government mentality or parents being over protective of tehir kids at all. I know my kids will get hurt from time to time (Just last week i spent three hours in the emergency room because my youngest injured her hand playing basketball). Most other parents I know are also cognizant of that fact and accept it too. The problem is that we have become so litigious as a society.

Think about it. Do you think hordes of parents beat down the doors of parks and recreation departments across the country demanding that merry go rounds be removed, slides be made almost flat, kids not be allowed to run in the park, etc? I haven't seen that. What DOES happen is that one kid wil get hurt and their parent, either in anger or because they see visions of dollar signs float throught heir heads, sues someone. And, win or lose, that someone doesn't want to be sued again, so they nerf whatever caused the injury. Multiply that thousands, maybe millions of times over the years and voila' you have the situation we find ourselves in today.
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Old 20th October 2005, 12:48 PM   #51
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Fear of being sued ruins a lot of things. The beach here has very inadequate parking. In the spring and summer, tourist season, there are private lots down there that charge $5 for parking and make a lot of money. In winter and fall, with no tourists around, they chain up the lots. Why not let people park there for free in the winter? Because someone might fall down and sue the walrus out of the lot's owners.

So for half the year, we have to drive around fighting for a few parking spaces while there are empty lots all over the place.
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Old 20th October 2005, 04:55 PM   #52
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I agree that we are excessively ligitious--but, the problem becomes, how do we back off of that without closing the courtroom door to people that need and deserve legal relief? Most suggestions I hear tend to throw the baby out with the bathwater.

I guess that's why I'm a liberal rather than a radical--I believe in careful changes, leaving most of what we have intact.
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Old 21st October 2005, 03:20 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by RandFan View Post
This is one of the reasons I'm glad I have kids. It's a great way to tell PC morons to go screw themselves. I buy the toy guns, GI Joe's and fireworks for my kids. I let them be kids, swim in pools, swing on swings and slide on slides. I supervise them when appropriate and try to teach them how to be safe for when they are on their own. I set rules and discipline my children when they are acting inappropriately. I accept responsibility when they do something wrong. At what I deem an appropriate age I let them listen to violent and crude music and watch R-Rated movies and crude cartoons like South Park. As they get older and I see that they are able to handle responsibility I let them make more and more decisions and help them develop a healthy sense of independence.

They are great kids. Not perfect but I'm damn proud of them. Take that PC idiots.
When I was about 9 or 10, my mother kept me home from Catholic school one day so we could go to the movies together. We saw "Blazing Saddles." It doesn't get much cruder (or funnier) than that.

And I knew what almost all the dirty words meant, being a product of the aforementioned Catholic school (except for "schtup").

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Old 21st October 2005, 05:42 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by Beerina View Post
.... bad cut on thumb, which when noticed days later, said infection had caused a big red streak all the way up his arm, i.e. anything more than 60 years ago and he'd be dead at age 6
Not necessarily. This happened to my mother when she was about 15, in about 1930. No antibiotics. They had to operate to scrape out the infected bone marrow, and she still has a very interesting scar on her forearm. The doctor told her mother, when she went home, "There goes the very lucky girl. And I'd still be saying that if she'd been going home without her arm."

Rolfe.
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Old 21st October 2005, 09:32 AM   #55
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Bike helmets won't make you more fearless: remember, there's still all those other bones you can break if you ride like a dumbass.

I used to ride like a dumbass when I was a teenager, and it wasn't because I was helmeted, it was because I felt invincible. Then a bad spill (I flew over a car) totalled my bike, demolished my helmet and broke my left arm in two places. Live and learn. But I think that I would have probably not lived to learn without my helmet.
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Old 21st October 2005, 09:50 AM   #56
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Our/my generation

Our/my generation is the lamest ever to inhabit the planet and I am ashamed to be associated. I never bought that "greatest generation" stuff about the WWII generation, but they are certainly greater than mine. Hippies turned out to be the biggest bunch of buttwipes as adults that I can imagine. My parents generation certainly had their shortcomings, but I would take them over us any time. Take a concept like "zero tolerance" and apply it to absolutely everything - takes any thinking or effort or meaning out of everything. It pretty much sums up who we have become. We have zero tolerance for existance.
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Old 21st October 2005, 10:31 AM   #57
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All you need to know about the hippie generation is "country line dancing." Nuff said.

Of course, they were also responsible for flower power, disco, and yuppies, but sometimes, you just gotta draw a line.
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