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Old 31st March 2015, 08:09 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by catsmate1 View Post
Yeah covers can be a bit hit and miss.at one's good but it doesn't seem to be related to the story.
I prefer the original (also used in reprints) or the International Polygonics cover (which seems to capture Fell very well).
I did look for that one, but didn't find it.

That is to say, I didn't find it on sites where I would be able to buy it, which excludes Amazon from the get-go.
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Old 31st March 2015, 08:17 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
I have always enjoyed Carr's The Nine Wrong Answers, in which nine times there is a footnote saying that if the reader thinks the answer is thus-and-so, the reader is wrong. The tenth time, of course, is the revelation of the mystery.

This is the most overt game between mystery writer and mystery reader that I've seen.
Will look it up. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 31st March 2015, 01:16 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by Bram Kaandorp View Post
I did look for that one, but didn't find it.

That is to say, I didn't find it on sites where I would be able to buy it, which excludes Amazon from the get-go.
I got the reprint in a second hand bookshop, a hardcover older than me by thirty years. I got the IP version when I accidentally ordered it when they started reprinting Dickson/Carr.

In fact the little specialist bookshop ('Murder Ink') where I ordered them used to refer to Dickson/Carr as the "kiss of death" for any publisher; when one started reprinting the series they'd get in financial trouble. Apparently three publishers started reprinting them but disappeared before finishing...
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Old 31st March 2015, 01:20 PM   #84
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Originally Posted by Bram Kaandorp View Post
Will look it up. Thanks for the tip.
The first three Merrivale books (The Plague Court Murders, The White Priory Murders and The Red Widow Murders are worth reading. After that the series gets a bit spotty. The best Fell books (IMO) are Problem of the Green Capsule, He Who Whispers and Till Death Do Us Part.
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Old 2nd April 2015, 06:41 AM   #85
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_Unhinged: The Trouble With Psychiatry—A Doctor’s Revelations About a Profession in Crisis_ -- Dr. Daniel Carlat


Forget the lurid title. This is one of the best critical overviews, by a practicing psychiatrist. If anything, he's too much of a believer in his own treatments. As far as I know, he still prescribed benzos for chronic use, for example.


a review:

http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/film...fession-crisis


One thing I like about it is that it's concerned with the present. Too many books go into tedious historical detail, all the way back to Galen.

Oh, and while I'm on the subject. I've noticed that the standard boilerplate defense of psychiatry -- you know, Cuckoo's Nest (not), lobotomy (no more), stigma of mental illness (being spun the wrong way), just-like-insulin (utter nonsense), no danger of addiction (a lie, or a purely semantic argument), criticism is Scientology, etc. -- with its bland reassurances, as if written for eight-year-olds -- ignores the present-day, relevant issues:

--efficacy
--publication bias
--conflict of interest
--marketing
--modified placebo effect
--"desire to please the doctor" effect
--long-term effects
--problems with DSM
--drug company juggernauts
--circle-the-wagons, or professional guild loyalty to itself
--problems with managed care: short, perfunctory consulations, etc., bias against talking-cure

just for starters.

But Carlat's book at least mentions all of these issues.

Last edited by calebprime; 2nd April 2015 at 06:52 AM.
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Old 4th April 2015, 11:45 AM   #86
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_Let Them Eat Prozac_ -- David Healy

Again, provocative title, but solid information. Healy also displays an inappropriate sense of humor on his blog.

This is both a history and a personal memoir. Healy learns as he goes.

One of the more interesting nuggets is a small double-blind study of healthy volunteers he conducted -- the volunteers being largely health professionals, including nurses and psychiatrists.

pgs 174-190:

Half of the people were given Zoloft (sertraline) , half reboxetine. Then the drugs were switched. What was interesting to me is that there were marked preferences among the volunteers: some felt good on one drug, some felt horrible, and vice versa.

Two healthy volunteers became suicidal.

The result seemed to agree with a study by Joyce and Mulder showing that people's response to an AD can be predicted somewhat by a personality test.

I think it might be this one:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3104887/

Some other nuggets:

Quote:
Chasing the question of whether Zoloft caused emotional blunting, half the group said it had given them a "nothing bothers me" feeling. Reactions were split about this: Some liked the effect; others found it made them emotionally dead. Reboxetine, in contrast, didn't seem to make anyone feel indifferent.

and, on the issue of suicidality:



It seems that a small but significant number of people -- who weren't suicidal before -- become suicidal on SSRIs, especially at the beginning of treatment.

Now, there is (imo, absolutely terrible) advice from some quarters to stay on the med at the beginning -- that this will pass. It seems that the proper question should be whether someone who has a bad reaction to a psychoactive drug should be on that drug at all to begin with.

Less than 40% of people are "compliant" (an ugly word) with SSRI medications: They stop taking them fairly quickly.

When the first studies of Prozac were done, it failed most tests. It was considered to be a poor antidepressant by the Germans and some others. Also, it was considered necessary to give people a benzo at the same time at the beginning of treatment to calm down the agitation caused by the drug.

It also seems that the statistics on suicide vary hugely. If you take the suicide rate of people hospitalized for depression, it's very high, and this might be considered justification for drug treatment. But if you calculate the rate based on people who were not hospitalized, it's much lower. This may seem obvious, but when different groups are arguing, they may use one set of numbers or the other.


It seems that there is an agitation produced by Prozac that is quite distinct from their depression.


Anyway, this is a slightly rambling, somewhat blow-by-blow book, but full of interesting information.

some reviews:

http://metapsychology.mentalhelp.net...id=2744&cn=158

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3192386/

Last edited by calebprime; 4th April 2015 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 14th April 2015, 05:28 AM   #87
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Recently I've read harrowing tales of survivial.

Into Thin Air by John Krakauer
Endurance: Shackletons incredible voyage
Heart Of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
Adrift 76 days lost at sea by Steve Callahan

I like the genre. Can anyone recommend similar titles?
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Old 14th April 2015, 05:48 AM   #88
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Two.....
1. Richard Schenkman's "I Love Paul Revere Whether He Rode Or Not". Schenkman is a historian who's written several books on common myths and misconceptions of American history.

2. "Shoot the President? Are you mad?" by Frank MacAuliffe. This is an "Augustus Mandrell" story, the last published by MacAuliffe. For those who enjoy clever prose and black humor, these books are a treasure.
Mandrell is an assassin with a droll sense of humor and a penchant for getting involved in fantastical "commissions". In one, he is charged with rescuing one of Hitler's doubles after the war. The fellow is quite likely the real McCoy, and ends up becoming the commissioner of baseball.....
That might give a clue as to MacAuliffe's thinking.
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Old 14th April 2015, 05:48 AM   #89
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Two.....
1. Richard Schenkman's "I Love Paul Revere Whether He Rode Or Not". Schenkman is a historian who's written several books on common myths and misconceptions of American history.

2. "Shoot the President? Are you mad?" by Frank MacAuliffe. This is an "Augustus Mandrell" story, the last published by MacAuliffe. For those who enjoy clever prose and black humor, these books are a treasure.
Mandrell is an assassin with a droll sense of humor and a penchant for getting involved in fantastical "commissions". In one, he is charged with rescuing one of Hitler's doubles after the war. The fellow is quite likely the real McCoy, and ends up becoming the commissioner of baseball.....
That might give a clue as to MacAuliffe's thinking.
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Old 14th April 2015, 06:30 AM   #90
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Originally Posted by philkensebben View Post
Recently I've read harrowing tales of survivial.

Into Thin Air by John Krakauer
Endurance: Shackletons incredible voyage
Heart Of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
Adrift 76 days lost at sea by Steve Callahan

I like the genre. Can anyone recommend similar titles?

Was that Alfred Lansing's book on Shackleton? Good one. If it was by someone else, who wrote it?

Recommendation:

Alive by Piers Paul Read 1974. The story of an airplane crash in the Andes Mountains, and the aftermath.

As it turns out, I recently finished his The Dreyfus Affair: The Story of the Most Infamous Miscarriage of Justice in French History (2012)
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Old 14th April 2015, 06:43 AM   #91
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Was that Alfred Lansing's book on Shackleton? Good one. If it was by someone else, who wrote it?

Recommendation:

Alive by Piers Paul Read 1974. The story of an airplane crash in the Andes Mountains, and the aftermath.

As it turns out, I recently finished his The Dreyfus Affair: The Story of the Most Infamous Miscarriage of Justice in French History (2012)
Its the Alfred Lansing one. It was brilliant.

Thanks for your suggestion by Piers Paul Read. Will check it out. First I have Lost in The Jungle by Yossi Ghinsberg to get through first though.
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Old 16th April 2015, 05:26 PM   #92
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Crimea by Orlando figs plus rare earth by ward and brownlee and krauss's a universe from nothing. I'm reading Krause for the second time-physics is not my best point. Oh and a intresting book I got for 25p called reconstructing quaternary environments.
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Old 16th April 2015, 05:49 PM   #93
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I've been very much enjoying reading The Lord Of The Rings again. Ask me how many times I've read it. Go on, ask me.

Well, I can't tell you because I have no idea. I lost count when I was 14. It's pretty safe to say that Lord Of The Rings and Star Wars shaped my childhood and had a profound effect on my whole life.

It's been quite a few years since I last read it though, so I decided that it was time. That was a great decision.
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Old 16th April 2015, 07:09 PM   #94
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It's good to see someone else who has a lifelong relationship with the series.

I first read LOTR in about 1955 or 1956; it was first published in 1955. The first edition had large fold-out maps. Incidentally, Tolkein revised the riddle at the Back Door of Moria; originally it was both more subtle and more direct than in later editions.

I found the series in the public library, and was probably the second or third person to take it out. (In those days, the return date for a book was stamped in a little piece of paper affixed to the inside of the front cover, so one could see how many people had read the book prior to oneself.)

My daughter just told me that two weeks ago on a panel at a major science-fiction convention, she mentioned that her father had read The Hobbit to her chapter by chapter as a bedtime story when she was four or five.*

ETA, I read the series on average once a year.



*I won't say how old she is, but that was over 35 years ago.
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Old 17th April 2015, 03:21 AM   #95
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Star wars and lord of the rings-both stories with more morality and relevance than any religious text.
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Old 18th April 2015, 04:08 AM   #96
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An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Volume One of the Liberation Trilogy Paperback – May 15, 2007
by Rick Atkinson (Author)

Yeah, I'm slow.
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Old 18th April 2015, 05:58 AM   #97
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Re-reading as many Terry Pratchett's as I can. Just finished "Unseen Academicals" and moving on to "The Science of Discworld II: The Globe"
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Old 18th April 2015, 06:54 AM   #98
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Originally Posted by philkensebben View Post

I like the genre. Can anyone recommend similar titles?
At the Mercy of the Mountains by Peter Bronski.

I'm currently reading The Plains of Abraham, a history of North Elba/Lake Placid, NY.
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Old 20th April 2015, 11:03 AM   #99
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Originally Posted by philkensebben View Post
Recently I've read harrowing tales of survivial.

Into Thin Air by John Krakauer
Endurance: Shackletons incredible voyage
Heart Of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
Adrift 76 days lost at sea by Steve Callahan

I like the genre. Can anyone recommend similar titles?
Originally Posted by philkensebben View Post
Its the Alfred Lansing one. It was brilliant.

Thanks for your suggestion by Piers Paul Read. Will check it out. First I have Lost in The Jungle by Yossi Ghinsberg to get through first though.
My Dad has a copy of The Worst Journey in the World WP Maybe doesn't count as a tale of "survival" but might tick the other boxes...

The Sledge Patrol is pretty good.

Then there are the Joe Simpson WP autobiographies
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Old 20th April 2015, 03:23 PM   #100
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Quote:
The Worst Journey in the World
Have you read it?

I've been looking for a copy for a very long time. I guess I am not patronizing the right bookstores. Have you read it?

ETA just started Hero Found: The greatest POW escape of the Vietnam War by Bruce Henderson, 2010. Report coming when I finish the book.
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Old 20th April 2015, 03:59 PM   #101
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Reading

Just finished Alan Furst's "The Polish Officer". It was excellent, very moody and atmospheric recreation of occupied Europe under the Nazis. But it doesn't end. It just stops. Like he finished a chapter, got up to have dinner and never came back. Odd.

Now reading R. Murphy's (2015) "The Three Graces of Raymond Street. Murder, Madness, Sex and Politics in 1870s Brooklyn" and C. Spencer's (2014) "Killers of the King. nThe Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I". Both are excellent.
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Old 20th April 2015, 04:03 PM   #102
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Try In the garden of Beasts by Erik Larson, about the US Ambassador and his family in Berlin in the 1930s. It's chilling.
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Old 20th April 2015, 06:48 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Try In the garden of Beasts by Erik Larson, about the US Ambassador and his family in Berlin in the 1930s. It's chilling.
Just finished that not long ago; agree, highly recommended. His Thunderstruck is also excellent, and, for anyone who's ever been through a major hurricane (I've been through several, including Camille and Katrina), Isaac's Storm will resonate.
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Old 21st April 2015, 01:18 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by philkensebben View Post
Recently I've read harrowing tales of survivial.

Into Thin Air by John Krakauer
Endurance: Shackletons incredible voyage
Heart Of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
Adrift 76 days lost at sea by Steve Callahan

I like the genre. Can anyone recommend similar titles?
In the vein of Into Thin Air, and equally semi-controversial as far as who's telling the truth goes, there's always "No Way Down" by Graham Bowley on the 2008 K2 disaster.

In addition to that, the dispatches by Nick Rice tells another small part of the story: http://www.nickrice.us/index_files/k2dispatch.htm

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Old 21st April 2015, 09:11 AM   #105
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Quote:
The Worst Journey in the World
Have you read it?

I've been looking for a copy for a very long time. I guess I am not patronizing the right bookstores. Have you read it?

ETA just started Hero Found: The greatest POW escape of the Vietnam War by Bruce Henderson, 2010. Report coming when I finish the book.
I haven't got round to it yet...

It might have been his* dad's.


*ETA: i.e. my grandfather's ... there are a load of early to mid 20th Century books that I haven't got round to reading at Dad's - He recommended TE Laurence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom some time ago, but that is absolutely massive.
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Old 23rd April 2015, 10:22 PM   #106
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I just started Revival by Stephen King. I'm about 125 pages in. It's rather engrossing. Not sure yet if the story entails anything supernatural, but it has a sinister feeling, as though something... unusual is underlying the mostly mundane events we've been described thus far.

Any work of fiction that can succinctly describe the feeling of playing music is okay in my book.
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Old 26th April 2015, 12:56 AM   #107
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Have you read it?

I've been looking for a copy for a very long time. I guess I am not patronizing the right bookstores. Have you read it?

ETA just started Hero Found: The greatest POW escape of the Vietnam War by Bruce Henderson, 2010. Report coming when I finish the book.
I have it; it's excellent. In the Kingdom of Ice by Hampton Sides is another excellent polar-exploration survival story.

ETA: I found my copy at a library book sale. Paid the princely sum of $2 for it. $2 very well spent.
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Old 26th April 2015, 01:06 AM   #108
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Originally Posted by turingtest View Post
Just finished that not long ago; agree, highly recommended. His Thunderstruck is also excellent, and, for anyone who's ever been through a major hurricane (I've been through several, including Camille and Katrina), Isaac's Storm will resonate.
I'm reading his latest, Dead Wake (about the last crossing of the Lusitania). Good stuff so far. Larson is a very skilled writer, good at weaving a lot of different threads into a story.
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Old 26th April 2015, 03:15 AM   #109
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I'm reading, Paris 1870-71 the siege and commune, and where is everybody 50 solutions to the Fermi paradox and also the campaigns of Montrose about the 17th century general.
In fiction I'm re reading the kindly ones, which is a great if chilling work.
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Old 26th April 2015, 03:25 PM   #110
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How the West Won: The Neglected Story of the Triumph of Modernity by Rodney Stark

and

Heretic: Why Islam Needs a Reformation Now by Ayaan Hirsi Ali


(Much better) ideas were/are the main engine behind the making of Modernity (including the Christian idea that God is Reason). Stark's book is a little too 'strong' but overall I'm afraid evidence points toward Western Europe as the main factor behind Modernity (some religious ideas included), there was no 'multicultural avenue' here.

And islam really needs a reformation (actually a transformation even according with Ayaan). Re(tran)formation NOW for the Islamic Weltanshauung leads to siginficanlty different actions at the practical level to just wait for time to solve the problems.

Some may say that such views are not mainstream these days (although they were so in the past), which is true, but any honest thinker can also see easily that the current paradigms in these fields are on very very thin ice (personally I dare say that they are the real revisionist interpretations of history & current facts being based on ideological bias: the first task of historians is to pursue a 'multicultural approach', islam is no more controversial intrinsically than Christianity thus as easily to reform etc).

Anyways one thing is very clear to me: we deal with perfectly legitimate directions of research and we should do better to pay attention to them instead of attempting to 'debunk' with all costs (intellectual dishonesty is the price paid but not only).

PS As a side note, no one should be offended but I've been attacked too many times now by all sort of 'purists' believing they are on a high moral ground & defenders of objectivity when I was merely saying my point of view, the 'cranks', in this problem, seen by some at all places exist only in their rich imagination (they should rather think that they may be the real cranks, a much more moderate approach needed).

If we really want to put the basis of a much better world we should know to begin from reality, myths are never a solution on long term. I am not part of the Western Civilization myself but I have the power to recognize its unique merits in the making of Modernity (without it we could have been, very well, still in the middle Ages) and even the positive parts of the Christian worldview. That was the truth and I accept it, creating a much better world is in no way blocked by an eurocentrist approach here (accepting also the merits of Christianity when compared with islam especially).
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My view of Ayaan Hirsi Ali's book 'Heretic'

Last edited by metacristi; 26th April 2015 at 03:44 PM.
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Old 26th April 2015, 04:34 PM   #111
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Reading the "Advanced Reader Copy" of 1636: The Cardinal Virtues in Eric Flint's "Ring of Fire series.

The series (now up to about 19 books and several hundred on-line stories) is about the W. Virginia town of Grantville which is sent back in time to 1631 in Central Germany, smack in the middle of the 30 Year's War.

This novel focuses on France, Louis XIII and his brother, and Cardinal Richelieu (actual historical figures, BTW) and how Frances fares in an age where everything has been upended by the introduction of 20th century tech (some of which they can produce...some of which is being 'built down') and more importantly 20th century thought and history.

So far only about 1/8 the way in, but the 'butterfly effect' is more evident than usual, and hopefully with the main characters established, the story will pick up.

Can't recommend it, even if it is a good read, unless you're willing to read the first 3 books (1632, 1633, and 1634: The Baltic War), which is a bit much to ask for one novel.
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Old 27th April 2015, 06:53 AM   #112
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Originally Posted by Hutch View Post
Reading the "Advanced Reader Copy" of 1636: The Cardinal Virtues in Eric Flint's "Ring of Fire series.

The series (now up to about 19 books and several hundred on-line stories) is about the W. Virginia town of Grantville which is sent back in time to 1631 in Central Germany, smack in the middle of the 30 Year's War.

This novel focuses on France, Louis XIII and his brother, and Cardinal Richelieu (actual historical figures, BTW) and how Frances fares in an age where everything has been upended by the introduction of 20th century tech (some of which they can produce...some of which is being 'built down') and more importantly 20th century thought and history.

So far only about 1/8 the way in, but the 'butterfly effect' is more evident than usual, and hopefully with the main characters established, the story will pick up.

Can't recommend it, even if it is a good read, unless you're willing to read the first 3 books (1632, 1633, and 1634: The Baltic War), which is a bit much to ask for one novel.
An excellent series. The first books can be found online as ebooks, free and legit.
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Old 27th April 2015, 11:32 AM   #113
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Originally Posted by catsmate1 View Post
An excellent series. The first books can be found online as ebooks, free and legit.

Do you have a link to share?
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Old 27th April 2015, 11:48 AM   #114
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Do you have a link to share?
Certainly.
The first couple can be hand from the Baen Free Library, now alas a shadow of it's former self.

The books:
  • 1632
  • 1633
  • 1634: The Baltic War
  • 1634: The Bavarian Crisis
  • 1634: The Galileo Affair
  • 1634: The Ram Rebellion
  • 1635: The Cannon Law
  • 1635: The Tangled Web
  • 1635: The Dreeson Incident
can be downloaded from one of the archives of the old Baen CDs (e.g. here) though you'll have to download a 3-400MB file and extract what you want.

Personally I'm reading an eARC of David Weber's new novel in the War God's Own series The Sword of the South. Also in the pile are some of A. B. Chandler's John Grimes stories, Conroy's latest alt-hist 1882: Custer in Chains by Robert Conroy
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As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
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Old 27th April 2015, 12:21 PM   #115
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Originally Posted by jhunter1163 View Post
I'm reading his latest, Dead Wake (about the last crossing of the Lusitania). Good stuff so far. Larson is a very skilled writer, good at weaving a lot of different threads into a story.
Ah, didn't know Larson had a new book out. I'll look for that one, thanks.
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Old 27th April 2015, 12:27 PM   #116
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Originally Posted by Vortigern99 View Post
I just started Revival by Stephen King. I'm about 125 pages in. It's rather engrossing. Not sure yet if the story entails anything supernatural, but it has a sinister feeling, as though something... unusual is underlying the mostly mundane events we've been described thus far.

Any work of fiction that can succinctly describe the feeling of playing music is okay in my book.
I have to admit, I found Revival disappointing. I am looking forward to his new one (available beginning of June), Finders, Keepers- my understanding is that it's the second in a projected trilogy that began with Mr. Mercedes (which I did like).
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Old 27th April 2015, 04:22 PM   #117
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Short review of "Hero Found"

As promised up-thread, here is a quick review of Hero Found by Bruce Henderson, 2010.

Dieter Dengler was a naturalized US citizen who had grown up in Germany during and immediately after WW II. As part of learning to survive there, his mother taught him and his brother about edible plants, and something about survival in the woods.

After Dengler came to the US, he joined the military, first as an enlisted man and later after getting a two-year degree, as a Naval Aviation officer. In his first (only) tour in Southeast Asia, he was shot down in Laos, captured, and held prisoner for a long time. The book details his evasion of his captors, his eventually-successful signalling to US aircraft and his rescue. It then covers the rest of his life until his suicide in about 2001.

While this was an interesting book (and particularly for me because I had been an electrical instrument technician on the kind of plane he was flying), and not to detract from Dengler's feat, it was not as "great" as the author portrays.

For a much better escape book (two, actually) look here:

http://www.amazon.com/Escape-Colditz.../dp/0397009429
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Old 30th April 2015, 12:20 AM   #118
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Just started Skeletons on the Sahara by Dean King. Excellent so far. Right up my alley for tales of hardship.
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Old 5th May 2015, 06:18 PM   #119
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

It's a story about a kid who's a wizard but didn't know it until he got the invite to a wizarding school.

It's actually book 3 of a series of books.

Although I doubt anyone has ever heard of it.
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Old 6th May 2015, 04:14 AM   #120
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John Sandford's latest Lucas Davenport novel (the twenty-fifth) Gathering Prey.
Ian McDonald's Desolation Road, time travel and trains, on Mars.
Various works on Percy Fawcett and his disappearance, for an article I'm writing.
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