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Old 1st May 2020, 06:18 AM   #1
Wudang
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Words recently found or obscure.

On twitter I follow @susie_dent. On UK TV she is the "dictionary corner" of the TV show "Countdown", an anagram sort of show. Today on twitter
https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...870007808?s=20

Quote:
‘Ipsedixitism’ is the dogmatic assertion that something is true because someone, somewhere said it, and without offering any supporting evidence whatsoever. (From the Latin for ‘he said it’).
Previously "While Toilet Duck and Dettol are trending, here's a reminder of the word 'ultracrepidarian': one who consistently offers opinions and advice on subjects way beyond their understanding."
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Old 1st May 2020, 06:29 AM   #2
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Quizzaciously, courtesy of VSAUCE.

In the Oxford English Dictionary but appears nowhere on Wikipedia, the Gutenberg Corpus, the British National Corpus, the American National Corpus, and only once on Google (as of the posting of the video, it's obviously changed since then).

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCn8zs912OE
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Old 1st May 2020, 08:37 AM   #3
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Rampede. A portmanteau of rampage and stampede. Unique to me, as far as I know, but I'm hoping it'll catch on.
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Old 1st May 2020, 08:50 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Rampede. A portmanteau of rampage and stampede. Unique to me, as far as I know, but I'm hoping it'll catch on.
Probably a better choice than Stampage, which sounds like some kind of 19th century legal fee.

Dve
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Old 1st May 2020, 08:57 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
Probably a better choice than Stampage, which sounds like some kind of 19th century legal fee.

Dve
https://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...?term=stampage
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Old 1st May 2020, 08:58 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
Probably a better choice than Stampage, which sounds like some kind of 19th century legal fee.

Dve


More 18th I'd say. Something German George would impose.
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Old 1st May 2020, 09:05 AM   #7
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One that pleased me when I stumbled on it a couple of years back : selcouth
Quote:
from Middle English, from Old English selcūþ, seldcūþ (“unusual, unwonted, little known, unfamiliar, novel, rare”), from seld- (“rarely”) + cūþ (“known”); equivalent to seld +‎ couth.
So selcouth is selcouth. Compare its roots to the roots of seldom and uncouth.
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Old 1st May 2020, 09:16 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
I'd like to take this moment to say I think Urban Dictionary is full of ****:

https://www.urbandictionary.com/add.php

It's not an actual dictionary. Anyone can add any word, any definition they like, any time, with no review or standards.

Maybe the definition you get is an actual word in common use. Maybe it's a bit of jargon specific to seven people in the same circle of friends. Maybe it's a prank by anyone with an internet connection. Watch that space for "rampede", coming soon to the worst dictionary ever.
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Old 1st May 2020, 09:38 AM   #9
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I like "*********". I don't know for sure what it means, but MdC called me it years ago and it stuck in my head...
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Old 1st May 2020, 11:11 AM   #10
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Bunkrapt. Old favourite; self-explanatory.

I found it in Peter Medawar's Pluto's Republic. He got it from the humourist Paul Jennings ( who also gave the world Resistentialism).
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Old 1st May 2020, 11:47 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I'd like to take this moment to say I think Urban Dictionary is full of ****:
That can't be true. See: https://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...20the%20piglet
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Old 1st May 2020, 11:51 AM   #12
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Love neologisms. Who says people can’t make up words? Shakespeare was a master of the trade. If they are useful they hang around. If not, not.

Not a terribly recent one, but I love “jaqing off”. It was used often in 9/11 conspiracy threads.
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Old 1st May 2020, 11:54 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Dr. Keith View Post
Oh yes! Was it the marquis who came up with this? Wolfman? I can’t remember.

Ah no, I didn’t read the link fully. Tricky. Legend.
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Old 1st May 2020, 12:20 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I'd like to take this moment to say I think Urban Dictionary is full of ****:
Well, yes, not to mention ****, ***, *******, ************* and ******. That's kind of what Urban Dictionary is there for.

Dave
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Old 1st May 2020, 12:22 PM   #15
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"overmorrow" The day after tomorrow.

"ereyesterday" The day before yesterday.

The equivalent words still seem to be in common use in many other languages, but somehow they have fallen out of use in English. When speaking Nepali, I often used the equivalent words (parsee, hastee), and now that I am learning German I use them in that language too.

I find Thee, Thou, Thy interesting. I had always though they were the equivalent of the more formal pronoun, like Usted in Spanish or Sie in German. I had it backwards, "Thou" was more equivalent to "Tu" or "Du". It's like when English went all egalitarian, everyone got promoted instead of demoted.

Last edited by crescent; 1st May 2020 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 1st May 2020, 04:06 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I'd like to take this moment to say I think Urban Dictionary is full of ****:

https://www.urbandictionary.com/add.php

It's not an actual dictionary. Anyone can add any word, any definition they like, any time, with no review or standards.

Maybe the definition you get is an actual word in common use. Maybe it's a bit of jargon specific to seven people in the same circle of friends. Maybe it's a prank by anyone with an internet connection. Watch that space for "rampede", coming soon to the worst dictionary ever.
I just think of it as not being peer reviewed.
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Old 1st May 2020, 04:15 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by lionking View Post
Oh yes! Was it the marquis who came up with this? Wolfman? I can’t remember.

Ah no, I didn’t read the link fully. Tricky. Legend.
Seems to date back 10 years on this forum. ISTR being involved in trying to get the phrase memeified.
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Old 1st May 2020, 04:20 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
"overmorrow" The day after tomorrow.

"ereyesterday" The day before yesterday.

The equivalent words still seem to be in common use in many other languages, but somehow they have fallen out of use in English. When speaking Nepali, I often used the equivalent words (parsee, hastee), and now that I am learning German I use them in that language too.

I find Thee, Thou, Thy interesting. I had always though they were the equivalent of the more formal pronoun, like Usted in Spanish or Sie in German. I had it backwards, "Thou" was more equivalent to "Tu" or "Du". It's like when English went all egalitarian, everyone got promoted instead of demoted.
I like the way you snuck that into the conversation.

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Old 1st May 2020, 05:49 PM   #19
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"attar"
Something to do with flower scents.

I don't believe I've ever encountered it before, but catching up on my Games Magazine crossword puzzles, some of which are a few years old, in two separate issues that word came up. I would have thought it would be as common as "tsar" or "Asta" as a grid-filler.
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Old 1st May 2020, 06:34 PM   #20
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A couple of favorites that one can actually occasionally use:

grawlix: the representation of a cuss word by characters, as in a cartoon.

swarf: the metal waste that accumulates after machining.

gupsh: phonetic spelling of an Egyptian word for the waste left over after stone work such as pyramid building.

tersorium: the brush used by ancient Romans in lieu of toilet paper.

frape: the rabble.

greeble: adding texture to a surface to make it more interesting. A drawing or the like so treated is said to be greebled.
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Old 1st May 2020, 07:23 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
---snipped---
greeble: adding texture to a surface to make it more interesting. A drawing or the like so treated is said to be greebled.


I'd assume this is also the origin of the word: "greeblee". Greeblees (the plural) are the small detail bits attached to the surface of a science fiction model. They have no specific purpose, just add complexity.

For example, Star Destroyer bridge:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg star-destroyer-back.jpg (84.7 KB, 14 views)

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Old 2nd May 2020, 10:25 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Lord Muck oGentry View Post
Bunkrapt. Old favourite; self-explanatory.

I found it in Peter Medawar's Pluto's Republic. He got it from the humourist Paul Jennings ( who also gave the world Resistentialism).
In times past, I've loved Jennings's writing -- well, would say I still do; but had thought little about him in recent years. Gentle whimsy, rather than trenchant go-for-the-jugular satire, was his thing; I'm one who prefers the former kind of humour to the latter. He had certain favourite and often-visited themes: one was his endless losing struggle to try to learn German; another, the strange and sometimes oddly meaningful stuff produced by his inexpert "do-it-yourself" typewriter use -- by which, IIRC, "bunkrapt" first saw the light of day (but proved a splendid word in its own right).

He wrote mostly small essay-length pieces, and light verse; and one novel, And Now for Something Exactly the Same -- which novel drew a good deal on his experience of having worked for a while in advertising: I found it unexpectedly poignant and, in its gentle way, often hilariously funny.

Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
"attar"
Something to do with flower scents.

I don't believe I've ever encountered it before, but catching up on my Games Magazine crossword puzzles, some of which are a few years old, in two separate issues that word came up. I would have thought it would be as common as "tsar" or "Asta" as a grid-filler.
Attar: indeed, a kind of flower-derived perfume, if I understand rightly. Have only ever seen it in one context -- the first time, long ago -- the specific phrase "attar of roses". The connection re which that stuck in my mind: it seems that the growing and perfume-processing of roses has for centuries been a big and quite economically-significant activity in Bulgaria. Someone who held a low opinion of Bulgaria and its people, was reported as opining to the effect that "There's nothing to Bulgaria except backward insanitary barbarism, and attar of roses".
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Old 2nd May 2020, 10:38 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
A couple of favorites that one can actually occasionally use:


swarf: the metal waste that accumulates after machining.
In my professional capacity, I once designed a large swarf collector for a grinding system, complete with a rotating bucket carousel so a specialty steel company could isolate different metals for recycling.
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Old 2nd May 2020, 11:42 AM   #24
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Amusingly, "attar" is a word whose meaning I found out when I was about 9 years old. Why? It appeared in a Donald Duck comic! I don't now remember the details, but I think the ever entrepreneurial Donald was trying to invent a perfume, or perhaps trying to disguise something in a perfume. Attar of roses. Context is all.
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Old 2nd May 2020, 12:30 PM   #25
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Fent: a remnant of cloth, or a slit in a garment.


ETA, in Spanish, the words rincón and esquina both mean "corner."



But one means "inside corner," and the other means "outside corner.
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Old 2nd May 2020, 12:37 PM   #26
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I don't have any new words to present, but reading this thread reminds me of a time when I noticed the word iffy in a dictionary I had and it was defined as "abounding in contingencies or having many uncertain or unknown qualities or conditions".

I remember laughing thinking that people were probably going around saying ""abounding in contingencies or having many uncertain or unknown qualities or conditions" all the time until someone came up with the idea to just go with something shorter and easier to say. Thus "iffy" was born.
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Old 2nd May 2020, 12:41 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
FETA, in Spanish, the words rincón and esquina both mean "corner."
But one means "inside corner," and the other means "outside corner.
Are you a native speaker, or fluent (whatever that means)?

I studied through University and would call myself conversational and I've read a bunch of novels in Spanish, but I never picked up on this for whatever reason.

Can you elaborate a bit on the differences?
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Old 2nd May 2020, 02:20 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
Amusingly, "attar" is a word whose meaning I found out when I was about 9 years old. Why? It appeared in a Donald Duck comic! I don't now remember the details, but I think the ever entrepreneurial Donald was trying to invent a perfume, or perhaps trying to disguise something in a perfume. Attar of roses. Context is all.
That reminds me. When reading the crossword clue I thought the answer might be ambergris, which is a very expensive perfume base. I learned the word from a book I read perhaps in junior high (middle) school. A couple kids were on the beach in Puget Sound and found a blob of the stuff. It probably stuck in my mind because, as the also said in the book, it's actually whale vomit.

I've probably heard or read the word maybe three times since then (about 45 years).
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Old 2nd May 2020, 03:26 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
"overmorrow" The day after tomorrow.
Ooooo, I like that one. Putting things off until tomorrow is for novice procrastinators. But procrastination in it's advanced form can put things off until overmorrow.


PS: Awwwww, looks like overmorrow can't be a word, the forum spellchecker underlines it in red!!
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Old 2nd May 2020, 04:28 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
Are you a native speaker, or fluent (whatever that means)?

I studied through University and would call myself conversational and I've read a bunch of novels in Spanish, but I never picked up on this for whatever reason.

Can you elaborate a bit on the differences?

[I am typing on a tablet, so having trouble with accent marks.]


Rincon as "corner" means an inside corner, the kind you see where two walls meet in a room. It's also used for "box canyon," as well as other things.


Esquina is the word for where the walls meet on the outside of the house. Also, for the street corner where you would hang out in Winslow Arizona watching all the girls go by. (Actually you'd share that corner with a statue.)



Linguists call that phenomenon "lexicalization": a concept that in language A needs a phrase, in language B is expressed in one word. It happens in lots of situations, and lots of languages.


A reverse example is that in English, we can say "He rolled down the hill," but in Spanish, we have to say, in effect, "He descended the hill rolling."
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Old 3rd May 2020, 09:05 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Rincon as "corner" means an inside corner, the kind you see where two walls meet in a room. It's also used for "box canyon," as well as other things.

Esquina is the word for where the walls meet on the outside of the house. Also, for the street corner where you would hang out in Winslow Arizona watching all the girls go by. (Actually you'd share that corner with a statue.)
Funny that I never noticed the difference between esquina and rincon even though I've probably seen and heard each of them hundreds of times. I just kept translating them to "corner" and I was right in a sense. Of course, I probably used the wrong one all the time in my speaking and writing, but no-one ever corrected me on it. Probably because they could understand what I meant. I wonder if it is a common error that Spanish speakers hear from non-native noobs.

Quote:
Linguists call that phenomenon "lexicalization": a concept that in language A needs a phrase, in language B is expressed in one word. It happens in lots of situations, and lots of languages.
I'm much better at Japanese than I am at Spanish, and Japanese is full of these. I never knew that this is what is referred to as a lexicaliztation.
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Old 4th May 2020, 06:40 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
Funny that I never noticed the difference between esquina and rincon even though I've probably seen and heard each of them hundreds of times. I just kept translating them to "corner" and I was right in a sense. [snop] I wonder if it is a common error that Spanish speakers hear from non-native noobs.

You don't notice the difference until it's pointed out, just as you, as a native speaker of English, might not think of the difference between short/long and short/tall as unusual, whereas a Spanish speaker would, because of bajo/alto and corto/largo.


Quote:
I'm much better at Japanese than I am at Spanish, and Japanese is full of these. I never knew that this is what is referred to as a lexicaliztation.

Lexicalization depends on perspective. So what is lexicalized in one language (only?) looks strange to a speaker of a langauge in which the concept is not lexicalized.
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Old 6th May 2020, 06:29 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
"overmorrow" The day after tomorrow.

"ereyesterday" The day before yesterday.

The equivalent words still seem to be in common use in many other languages, but somehow they have fallen out of use in English. When speaking Nepali, I often used the equivalent words (parsee, hastee), and now that I am learning German I use them in that language too.
Interesting - Malay also has that, at least in certain dialects. Kelmarin means day before yesterday (though I‘m told Indonesians and some Malaysians use it for yesterday), lusa means day after tomorrow, and tulak means three days from now.

Chinese has something similar, but embarrassingly as I am meant to be learning it, I forget what.

I don’t remember there being similar words in German from my GCSE. I do think they’re useful in concept. I’m going to try to revive the English ones.
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Old 6th May 2020, 07:24 AM   #34
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I am now fond of groaking. My dog always groaks when I am eating.
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Old 6th May 2020, 09:14 AM   #35
Apathia
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My contribution to the language is the word "bozoid."
It means something like a Bozo; Bozo The Clown.

Example: Prime Minister Boris Johnson.
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Old 6th May 2020, 09:29 AM   #36
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I used to do product support for a network security device. Because I'm bilingual, I handled a lot of our customers in Brazil

I'm bilingual, but I haven't lived in Brazil for many years, and I'm not up to date on all the recent additions of technical jargon to the Portuguese language. Early on in the job, there was a pretty significant learning curve.

There's no way to predict which IT terms in English will be -
- translated to an equivalent meaning
- translated literally
- kept in English, but with a Brazilian accent.

You just have to discover each term on a case by case basis.
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Old 6th May 2020, 09:39 AM   #37
Gord_in_Toronto
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I used to do product support for a network security device. Because I'm bilingual, I handled a lot of our customers in Brazil

I'm bilingual, but I haven't lived in Brazil for many years, and I'm not up to date on all the recent additions of technical jargon to the Portuguese language. Early on in the job, there was a pretty significant learning curve.

There's no way to predict which IT terms in English will be -
- translated to an equivalent meaning
- translated literally
- kept in English, but with a Brazilian accent.

You just have to discover each term on a case by case basis.
We have the same confusion here in Canada with Quebec French. About all you can be sure of is that will not be the same word the French in France use.
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Old 6th May 2020, 10:18 AM   #38
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I rather like sporange, an old form of sporangium, an enclosure where spores are formed. It also happens to be the only English word that rhymes with orange.
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Old 6th May 2020, 11:43 AM   #39
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"Holograph"

A manuscript hand written by it's author. Also a second meaning of 'autograph'.

Found in "The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll & Mr Hyde" which I've been listening to on the "Classic Ghost Story" podcast. Highly recommended, but he pronounces "Jekyll" as "Gee-Kill" and it's making me twitch every time I hear it.
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Old 6th May 2020, 12:25 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
"Holograph"

A manuscript hand written by it's author. Also a second meaning of 'autograph'.

Found in "The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll & Mr Hyde" which I've been listening to on the "Classic Ghost Story" podcast. Highly recommended, but he pronounces "Jekyll" as "Gee-Kill" and it's making me twitch every time I hear it.
Jee-kill is the traditional Scots pronunciation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strang...de#cite_note-2
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