IS Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » History, Literature, and the Arts
 


Welcome to the International Skeptics Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.
Tags favorite books , recommended books

Reply
Old 29th March 2016, 08:00 AM   #281
herrdocjdm
Thinker
 
herrdocjdm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 125
Originally Posted by KDLarsen View Post
Still slugging my way through Stephen King's 11/22/63. Lee Harvey Oswald has finally been introduced to the readers, and my god, were it not for his annoying, whiney persona, I'm almost willing to feel sorry for the guy.
It was a good read. I am currently reading King's Gunslinger. In the intro King said it is loosely based on the Sergio Leone's spaghetti westerns. I'm 100 pages in and it still hasn't grabbed me yet. Recently finished Boys in the Boat and a Eddie Richenbacker bio.
herrdocjdm is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 30th March 2016, 04:10 PM   #282
wasapi
Penultimate Amazing
 
wasapi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 14,148
I just picked up another Walter Mosley novel, Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned. Though it was published in 1998, his books stand up to the test of time.

The first book of his that I read was Devil in a Blue Dress. After reading that I was hooked. Mosley is a superb writer.
__________________
Julia
wasapi is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st April 2016, 03:40 PM   #283
jhunter1163
beer-swilling semiliterate
 
jhunter1163's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Connecticut, or King Arthur's Court. Hard to tell sometimes.
Posts: 25,381
Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
Still haven't finished Heart of Darkness really is the literary equivalent of trying to ford a river of treacle. Crazy, illogical, badly made treacle.

Between attempts I finished a random fantasy novel called The Palace Job (Oceans 11 meets Dungeons and Dragons kinda thing). It's okay. Not sure if I'll bother with the sequels. Then I chewed through a further four thru-hiking novels (I really am obsessed) and pleasantly managed to find another good one called Girl In The Woods. Now I'm reading Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer.
Into Thin Air is an excellent book, as I am sure you've discovered by now.

I'm reading Doris Kearns Goodwin's No Ordinary Time right now, about the home front in the USA in WWII. Pretty good, if a bit long. After that, I have The Heart Of Everything That Is, about Red Cloud and the Plains Indian wars of the 1850s and 60s.
__________________
A m°°se °nce bit my sister
jhunter1163 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st April 2016, 03:42 PM   #284
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Eleanor of Aquitaine:A Life by Alison Weir. It is excellent like all of her books. I don't really read fiction, mostly history.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st April 2016, 03:43 PM   #285
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Originally Posted by catsmate View Post
I'm on a London history kick, with an emphesis on the oddities, so here's my current pile.
Starting with the classics, London: The Biography by Peter Ackroyd and The History of London by Walter Besant

The Sexual History of London: From Roman Londinium to the Swinging City, Lust, Vice, and Desire Across the Ages by Catharine Arnold. Terrible title, good book.
London's Sinful Secret - The Bawdy History and Very Public Passions of London's Georgian Age by Dan Cruickshank

David Long's The Little Book of the London Underground and Haunted London Underground by David Brandon and Alan Brooke. Plus, by the same authors, Tyburn: London's Fatal Tree.
Newgate: London's Prototype of Hell by Stephen Halliday
Christopher Winn's I Never Knew That About London.
Four books by Liza Picard; Elizabeth's London: Everyday Life in Elizabethan London, Victorian London - The Tale of a City 1840-1870, Restoration London: Everyday Life in the 1660s and Doctor Johnson's London.
Two by Lee Jackson; Daily Life in Victorian London and Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth.

London's Royal Parks by Paul Rabbitts
London's Statues and Monuments by Peter Matthews
London's Docklands: A History of the Lost Quarter by Fiona Rule
The Black Death in London by Barney Sloane
A History of London in 100 Places by David Long
London at War: Relics of the Home Front from the World Wars by Alan Brooks
Bloody London by Declan McHugh
Attack on London: Disaster, Riot and War by Jonathan Oates
Georgian London: Into the Streets by Lucy Inglis
Tales From the Tower of London by Mark P. Donnelly
London Clubland: A Cultural History of Gender and Class in late-Victorian Britain by Amy Milne-Smith
Pepys's London: Everyday Life in London 1650-1703 by Stephen Porter
Imagined London by Anna Quindlen
I've read many of these, and I'm now adding the rest to my TBR list!
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th April 2016, 03:03 AM   #286
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
__In the Evil Day -- Violence Comes to a Small Town__ -- Richard Adams Carey


This interested me enough to write about it here. The writing -- sentence to sentence -- is fine, better than fine. The intention seems to be to give all the townsfolk who were caught up in this violence as much or more attention and respect than the angry gunman himself. And this is commendable.

The problem, at first and second glance, is this. We're reading the book because of the gunman. Call it a tension, or call it a contradiction. Doing justice to the victims and to history is in tension with our gutter-level interests. We want to know about the monster, not what the newspaper man had for breakfast.

For a while, all the loving evocation of the details of small-town life has a kind of kick to it, like the beginning of a Stephen King novel. But soon I began to get restless. Soon I wanted to get in my car and drive back to the flatlands as fast as possible.

The book needs more framing, more initial focus on the gunman. The author -- Richard Adams Cary -- needed a strong editor with a good tabloid instincts. But bless him for trying (and partly succeeding) in writing a very well-crafted book with integrity.

This will be my third little sitting with the book. First time, I got bogged down at the beginning. Second time, I was looking for chapters about the villain.

Oh, and one more thing. If there ever were a person who could have benefited from some simple talk-therapy, it's the villain here. The violence was pointless. If this man could have "owned" his own feelings, if he could have been a little reflective about his feuding with local government, none of the violence needed to have happened. (This isn't the Middle East we're talking about, here.)

I don't know if his resentments are identical to those of many white right-wing militia-men types, but they seem similar. Thing is, these resentments and his actions to satisfy them -- stockpiling bombs and ammo, etc. -- just seem...just seem...stupid.

Last edited by calebprime; 7th April 2016 at 03:07 AM.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th April 2016, 11:15 AM   #287
Polaris
Penultimate Amazing
 
Polaris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,396
The Tiger, by John Vaillant.

Found this on in the used book store a few weeks ago and remember seeing something on TV about the story not long after it happened.

It's about a strange case in 1997 where an Amur (Siberian) tiger hunted down, killed and ate a woodsman/poacher, then turned nearly exclusively to humans and their dogs as prey.

There's also a good bit about the history and ecology of the region, the culture and mythology of the native locals, the team sent to hunt and kill the tiger*, and theory on how predators fit into human prehistory and our psyche (all in digestible nuggets).

It's around 325 pages with small font, but it's been reading very quickly and I'll be wishing it was longer when I finish, I'm sure. The guy can really write.



*When the team leader's boss was asked during an interview with two UK journalists what the best solution would be for the survival of wild tigers, his answer was, "AIDS."
__________________
"There's vastly more truth to be found in rocks than in holy books. Rocks are far superior, in fact, because you can DEMONSTRATE the truth found in rocks. Plus, they're pretty. Holy books are just heavy." - Dinwar

"Let your ears hear this beautiful song that's hiding underneath the sound," Ed Kowalczyk.
Polaris is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 17th April 2016, 05:26 AM   #288
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
_The Lost Tribe: a harrowing passage into new guinea's heart of darkness_ by Edward Marriott.


Terrible title. The subtitle is worse, and, I'd guess, an addition by the publisher.

This is really just a story of a young man having an adventure. As such, it's just right. The writing is fine, the focus is on what we want to know.

I've read two-thirds of it in one sitting.

The low ratings on Amazon are based on an impossible set of expectations. This book really isn't anthropology or journalism. (And these people aren't really lost, of course.) Some reviews are comically finicky. It's true: There are no emus in New Guinea. And that wasn't a minivan. While we're at it, the passage isn't all that harrowing.

I'd recommend this to anyone who ever fantasizes about this kind of journey.

Last edited by calebprime; 17th April 2016 at 05:27 AM.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 17th April 2016, 07:15 AM   #289
Captain_Swoop
Penultimate Amazing
 
Captain_Swoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 39,287
The Gallic Wars

By Julius Caesar

Translated by W. A. McDevitte and W. S. Bohn
Captain_Swoop is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 17th April 2016, 07:17 AM   #290
Captain_Swoop
Penultimate Amazing
 
Captain_Swoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 39,287
History of the Peloponnesian War
by Thucydides, translated by Richard Crawley
Captain_Swoop is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 18th April 2016, 02:33 PM   #291
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
Gay for Freud

_Modernism_ -- Peter Gay

This is an engaging survey. His two defining qualties of modernism are heresy (╔pater la bourgeoisie) and self-knowledge (or self-scrutiny).

As a huge fan of Freud, Gay is partly loyal to middle-class conservatism in art, such as Freud's. That is, he's loyal to the bourgeoisie so often scorned by many of these artists.

That warfare or contention between the avant-garde and the conservatives doesn't interest me much, and I sense Gay is a welterweight, but this is an entertaining read.

I also don't think trying to be shocking really interested someone like Schoenberg all that much, either. I think he believed he was doing what he had to do, in musical terms. I think he was much more serious than merely wanting to cause a sensation. (I'm convinced by, among other things, Schoenberg's deep study of harmony, and his results.)

In other words, I'll be surprised if Gay gets it. Of course, that's a matter of opinion.

Last edited by calebprime; 18th April 2016 at 02:36 PM.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 18th April 2016, 04:15 PM   #292
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
Originally Posted by calebprime View Post
_Modernism_ -- Peter Gay

...
Nope. I read the chapter on Schoenberg. Gay has no feel for the subject. I don't know what he does understand, but it's not music, or the spirit in which music is composed. There were mistakes and weird misrepresentations in almost every paragraph. These mistakes weren't merely sloppy, they were sort of willful.

If the rest of the book is this unreliable, it should be thrown out.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 18th April 2016, 07:52 PM   #293
wasapi
Penultimate Amazing
 
wasapi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 14,148
I've been reading many Dean Koonz books lately, and am just reading for the first time one of his Odd Thomas books. Yes, he weaves in a great deal of the supernatural, but I find many of his books to be brilliant.
__________________
Julia
wasapi is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 19th April 2016, 01:20 AM   #294
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
Originally Posted by calebprime View Post
_Modernism_ -- Peter Gay

This is an engaging survey. His two defining qualties of modernism are heresy (╔pater la bourgeoisie) and self-knowledge (or self-scrutiny).

...
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/30/bo...el-t.html?_r=0

Confirms my feelings, without being as critical of the book as I am.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st April 2016, 11:23 AM   #295
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Imagine there's no heaven by Mitchell Stephens. Pretty good so far.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 08:06 AM   #296
ChristianProgressive
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,846
^If there's no Heaven, then there's only Hell.
ChristianProgressive is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 08:19 AM   #297
calebprime
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 13,001
Originally Posted by ChristianProgressive View Post
^If there's no Heaven, then there's only Hell.
???

eta: Even in the context of the song, that's not true.

Quote:
Imagine there's no heaven
It's easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people
Living for today...

Last edited by calebprime; 22nd April 2016 at 08:22 AM.
calebprime is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 01:23 PM   #298
ChristianProgressive
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,846
Originally Posted by calebprime View Post
???

eta: Even in the context of the song, that's not true.
If there is no Heaven, then there is no hope for the world.

That is the very essence of Hell: no hope.

But moving on:

I just finished Andrew Gaska's "Lo, the Rings of Saturn", first novella in the "Draconian Fire" trilogy from Blam! Noir's Buck Rogers revivial.

I'm working on "Wearing the Cape" by Marion G. Harmon.
ChristianProgressive is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 02:44 PM   #299
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Originally Posted by ChristianProgressive View Post
If there is no Heaven, then there is no hope for the world.

That is the very essence of Hell: no hope.

But moving on:

I just finished Andrew Gaska's "Lo, the Rings of Saturn", first novella in the "Draconian Fire" trilogy from Blam! Noir's Buck Rogers revivial.

I'm working on "Wearing the Cape" by Marion G. Harmon.
I think next I'm going to read Who Moved my Cheese. Cuz I smell a rat.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 08:19 PM   #300
ChristianProgressive
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,846
^If you have a point to make, go ahead and make it. I was trying to get the discussion back on topic but I'm happy to continue...mods might have a problem though.
ChristianProgressive is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd April 2016, 11:02 PM   #301
Polaris
Penultimate Amazing
 
Polaris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,396
The Healing Land, Rupert Isaacson.

About the KhoiSan, !Kung, Bushman peoples of southern Africa and how they're faring today (or at least this millenium). Slower going than many of my recent reads, but interesting all the same. Basically they're not doing so great.
__________________
"There's vastly more truth to be found in rocks than in holy books. Rocks are far superior, in fact, because you can DEMONSTRATE the truth found in rocks. Plus, they're pretty. Holy books are just heavy." - Dinwar

"Let your ears hear this beautiful song that's hiding underneath the sound," Ed Kowalczyk.
Polaris is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd April 2016, 04:19 AM   #302
Bram Kaandorp
Master Poster
 
Bram Kaandorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Limmen, The Netherlands
Posts: 2,534
Originally Posted by ChristianProgressive View Post
^If you have a point to make, go ahead and make it. I was trying to get the discussion back on topic but I'm happy to continue...mods might have a problem though.
I think I can make that point:

You basically said that no heaven means no hope, and then you said that we should just continue with the thread.

As if it is a foregone conclusion that hope is lost when there is no heaven, and there's no point arguing about it.

This is a skeptics forum. Arguing is the name of the game. "But moving on" doesn't mean anything here.

If anything, you were out of bounds making that comment, and even more so when you said it in such a matter-of-fact manner.

Maybe a split to a separate thread would be appropriate, so that this thread can go on without further interruptions.
__________________
Keep your questions terse, and your answers terser.

Wait, "terser" is a word, right?

Last edited by Bram Kaandorp; 23rd April 2016 at 04:20 AM.
Bram Kaandorp is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd April 2016, 05:05 AM   #303
catsmate
No longer the 1
 
catsmate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 26,350
Originally Posted by ChristianProgressive View Post
If there is no Heaven, then there is no hope for the world.
Yes there is. The hope for humans to stop blaming their problems on imaginary devils and expecting equally imaginary gods to save them and fix things for themselves.
__________________
As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
catsmate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd April 2016, 06:44 AM   #304
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Interesting point though, is that this book I'm reading that started this tangent is about how atheists advanced science and improved the living conditions of millions of people while the church persecuted them. So, this is educational I guess.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd April 2016, 07:02 AM   #305
SusanB-M1
Incurable Optimist
 
SusanB-M1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,766
I have been reading biographies of interesting women recently; four by Mary S Lovell about: Beryl Markham, Lady Jane Elizabeth Digby (A Scandalous Affair), Bess of Hardwicke, and The Mitford Girls. Also a biography of Gertrude Bell by Janet Wollach, but this was a bit weighted on the political side for my liking!
SusanB-M1 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 24th April 2016, 07:20 AM   #306
ChristianProgressive
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,846
Originally Posted by RogueKitten View Post
Interesting point though, is that this book I'm reading that started this tangent is about how atheists advanced science and improved the living conditions of millions of people while the church persecuted them. So, this is educational I guess.
Which is a hoary old myth in any event. Science was saved by the Church through the Dark Ages and into the Middle Ages. Monasteries were where the "great works" of Greek and Roman philosophy and science were preserved.

Indeed, much of the basic research that sparked the development of the sciences in the Middle Ages was done by churchmen, such as Venerable Bede, and in more modern times by such leading scholars as Gregor Mendel, et al.

I just stumbled across this interesting review of "God's Philosophers" (by James Hannam) that is in fact written by an atheist defending the book and debunking the "Church hated science" myth.

http://www.strangenotions.com/gods-philosophers/

I need to put that book on my reading list at some point.
ChristianProgressive is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 24th April 2016, 08:19 AM   #307
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Originally Posted by ChristianProgressive View Post
Which is a hoary old myth in any event. Science was saved by the Church through the Dark Ages and into the Middle Ages. Monasteries were where the "great works" of Greek and Roman philosophy and science were preserved.

Indeed, much of the basic research that sparked the development of the sciences in the Middle Ages was done by churchmen, such as Venerable Bede, and in more modern times by such leading scholars as Gregor Mendel, et al.

I just stumbled across this interesting review of "God's Philosophers" (by James Hannam) that is in fact written by an atheist defending the book and debunking the "Church hated science" myth.

http://www.strangenotions.com/gods-philosophers/

I need to put that book on my reading list at some point.
While it is demonstrably true that monasteries copied and thus preserved ancient knowledge (particularly in Ireland-see How the Irish Saved Civilization by Thomas Cahill) it is also demonstrably true that the church held back and directly persecuted scientic progress for centuries and continues to do so. See: Copernicus, Galileo, Darwin, any anatomist who wanted to dissect a body up until the 1910s, the catholic church still refusing stem cell research or condoms to prevent disease, etc, etc, etc. If you'd like some books on these topics I can pm you a list.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 24th April 2016, 11:30 AM   #308
Bram Kaandorp
Master Poster
 
Bram Kaandorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Limmen, The Netherlands
Posts: 2,534
Originally Posted by RogueKitten View Post
While it is demonstrably true that monasteries copied and thus preserved ancient knowledge (particularly in Ireland-see How the Irish Saved Civilization by Thomas Cahill) it is also demonstrably true that the church held back and directly persecuted scientic progress for centuries and continues to do so. See: Copernicus, Galileo, Darwin, any anatomist who wanted to dissect a body up until the 1910s, the catholic church still refusing stem cell research or condoms to prevent disease, etc, etc, etc. If you'd like some books on these topics I can pm you a list.
The simple lesson here seems to be:

Yes, the church was in favour of science, just as long as that science was in accord with the teachings of the church.

Galileo wasn't put under house arrest for doing science. It was for doing science that was contrary to what the church held as the truth.
__________________
Keep your questions terse, and your answers terser.

Wait, "terser" is a word, right?
Bram Kaandorp is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 24th April 2016, 12:16 PM   #309
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Originally Posted by Bram Kaandorp View Post
The simple lesson here seems to be:

Yes, the church was in favour of science, just as long as that science was in accord with the teachings of the church.

Galileo wasn't put under house arrest for doing science. It was for doing science that was contrary to what the church held as the truth.
Exactly. To claim the church promoted science is disingenuous...because of the church we were limited to the "knowledge" of ancient writers like Galen and forbidden to deviate from their understandings. Can you imagine today being forced to believe something written 2000 years ago is entirely accurate and inerrant, and having to base your life off of it?? Those poor, poor Mideval people.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 28th April 2016, 06:05 AM   #310
catsmate
No longer the 1
 
catsmate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 26,350
After a few of Francis Durbridge's Paul Temple mysteries I'm now reading Extreme Prey by John Sandford, the twenty sixth Lucas Davenport novel. Topically it features liberal and centrist Democrat candidates for the US presidency and a plot to kill one of them to support the other.
Of course as it's by Sandford there are a lot of twists and quite a few deaths, many by ostensibly good people for nominally good reasons.
I do miss Shrake and Jenkins though. They need a spin-off series of their own...
__________________
As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
catsmate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 28th April 2016, 08:15 AM   #311
Captain_Swoop
Penultimate Amazing
 
Captain_Swoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 39,287
BBC Radio 4 broadcast a Paul Temple story as a daily drama series every so often.

They have don a dozen or so mysteries so far.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03pc96p
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sms58/episodes/guide

Last edited by Captain_Swoop; 28th April 2016 at 08:19 AM.
Captain_Swoop is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 28th April 2016, 11:39 AM   #312
catsmate
No longer the 1
 
catsmate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 26,350
Originally Posted by Captain_Swoop View Post
BBC Radio 4 broadcast a Paul Temple story as a daily drama series every so often.

They have don a dozen or so mysteries so far.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03pc96p
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sms58/episodes/guide
Indeed, well worth a listen. I've got most of them.
__________________
As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
catsmate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 28th April 2016, 05:50 PM   #313
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Food in History by Reay Tannahill
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th April 2016, 10:22 AM   #314
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Now I am on to Religion for atheists by Alain de Botton

Eta this book kinda sucked so I am reading The Satanic Verses by Rushdie instead
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.


Last edited by Magrat; 29th April 2016 at 10:42 AM.
Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th April 2016, 11:36 AM   #315
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Originally Posted by RogueKitten View Post
Now I am on to Religion for atheists by Alain de Botton

Eta this book kinda sucked so I am reading The Satanic Verses by Rushdie instead
Ugh. Apparently I'm stupid because Satanic verses made zero sense, I couldn't figure out what was happening. Probably a dyslexic thing. This is why I don't read fiction.

Heavens to Betsy by Charles Funk.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th April 2016, 02:26 PM   #316
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
That book stunk too. I now have Galileo's Middle Finger by by Alice Dreger. I'm reading this one whether it is good or not because I'm tired of updating.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th April 2016, 03:36 PM   #317
jenspen
Critical Thinker
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 403
The Hidden Landscape: A Journey into the Geological Past by the palaentologist Richard Fortey. The landscape in question is that of the British Isles - one whose superficial qualities, both natural and man-made, have been determined by the underlying rocks. As the British Isles are formed of many various rocks of different ages and origins, they offer an interesting illustration of the history of Earth.

I have never come across a science writer who makes his topics more interesting - his style ranges from the poetically sublime to the amusingly ridiculous. I've read everything of his that I've been able to get hold of. As I'm reading The Hidden Landscape on my old Kindle, I have to get my full-colour illustrations via the computer and I'm taking things slowly. At the moment, I'm in a slate quarry in Wales. I have travelled a bit in the UK, though never in Ireland, so I'm not completely unfamiliar with the geography and that adds interest.

Following a recommendation from a friend, I listened to an interview with the crime novelist Donna Leon - http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/...ective/7343124 - and liked what she said. So I've begun her Beastly Things - "When a body is found floating in a [Venetian] canal...." and so far so good.
jenspen is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 29th April 2016, 06:38 PM   #318
Axxman300
Philosopher
 
Axxman300's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Central California Coast
Posts: 5,920
Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command
by Sean Naylor


A comprehensive narrative. The evolution of JSOC through the Iraq War in mind-blowing.
Axxman300 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st May 2016, 03:14 PM   #319
Magrat
Mrs. Rincewind
 
Magrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lancre Kingdom/Adirondack Mountain Region, NY
Posts: 4,296
Galileo's middle finger was excellent.

Now I am going to read god is not great by hitchens because I haven't and it gets mentioned so much I really feel like I ought to.
__________________
Non ergo nothi tere vos usque.

Magrat is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th May 2016, 03:07 PM   #320
Polaris
Penultimate Amazing
 
Polaris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,396
The Great War and Modern Memory, Paul Fussell.

I read a required chapter of this 16 years ago for a course on WW1 in college, and haven't picked it up much since despite wanting to. Now that I'm still on a months-long Great War kick I decided to tackle it once and for all, before buying any more books on the subject (as of this afternoon I failed in the latter attempt at discipline, and have three new titles on the table in front of me ).

Fussell's a great writer, and the man must have locked himself in a room with his research material for a decade before writing this one. Not so much a history of the war - you need to have a decent grasp of that already going into this one - it's about how the cataclysm of the Great War affected the culture and consciousness of the West going forward. This is a subject of great interest to me, as it's the theme of a back-burner script I'm writing about when the character of the nineteenth century died and gave way to the twentieth (a transition I place in 1915, after the Christmas Truce - the last gasp of the 19th, IMHO - and before Loos; probably around the battles of Neuve Chapelle and 2nd Ypres).

And speaking of 1915, I just finished Lyn Macdonald's excellent 1915: the Death of Innocence. Over 600 pages long, and saturated with first-person accounts of soldiers, civilians, officers (both field and staff), etc. I highly recommend it to anybody interested in the subject - there's a lengthy portion devoted to the Quintinshill train disaster, which I'm surprised isn't more widely know, being the worst rail crash in history and all. My only complaint about the book (something I mention in the Great War Books thread) is that it's exclusively about the UK/Territorial experience in Europe and Gallipoli - don't expect much about naval combat or Colonial troops, other than some minor mentions of the Gurkhas. All the same, I'll be reading her other books on the war.
__________________
"There's vastly more truth to be found in rocks than in holy books. Rocks are far superior, in fact, because you can DEMONSTRATE the truth found in rocks. Plus, they're pretty. Holy books are just heavy." - Dinwar

"Let your ears hear this beautiful song that's hiding underneath the sound," Ed Kowalczyk.
Polaris is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » History, Literature, and the Arts

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:34 PM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum began as part of the James Randi Education Foundation (JREF). However, the forum now exists as
an independent entity with no affiliation with or endorsement by the JREF, including the section in reference to "JREF" topics.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.