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Old 17th December 2017, 08:51 AM   #1
Cainkane1
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MY enclosed area theory and belief in ghosts

There is a house in my town that is huge. It has three full stories and an attic and full basement. Numerous sightings of ghosts have been reported mostly but not entirely by children.

Searching every nook and cranny of this building I have come to believe certain people see ghosts there because they feel someone should be there occupying all the empty spaces.

Humans evolved during times when large enclosed spaces were rare. If you came upon a cave someone or something was sure to be living there. You expected to see some human, hominid or animal occupying the cave or whatever.

The house is now occupied by a law firm and no spectral sightings have been reported.
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Old 17th December 2017, 09:28 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
The house is now occupied by a law firm and no spectral sightings have been reported.


Proof that even the dead have standards?
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Old 17th December 2017, 10:18 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
There is a house in my town that is huge. It has three full stories and an attic and full basement. Numerous sightings of ghosts have been reported mostly but not entirely by children.

Searching every nook and cranny of this building I have come to believe certain people see ghosts there because they feel someone should be there occupying all the empty spaces.

Humans evolved during times when large enclosed spaces were rare. If you came upon a cave someone or something was sure to be living there. You expected to see some human, hominid or animal occupying the cave or whatever.

The house is now occupied by a law firm and no spectral sightings have been reported.
I agree that this could be one of the reasons that some people see ghosts. Almost everywhere we go into on a daily base is in "use" in someway. I think when the lack of use seems out of place, as in the case of an abandoned building, it causes a subconscious reaction because your mind sees it as abnormal. Even something like going to your work place at night, when no one else is there, can be disconcerting. You're always there with other people, so your mind sees the lack of occupancy as an anomaly, putting you in a state of heightened awareness.

Once you get into that suggestive state, it becomes much easier to begin to imagine things that aren't there. If you already have a predisposition to believing in the supernatural, it won't be hard to make the leap that a place is haunted.
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Old 17th December 2017, 12:19 PM   #4
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I find large buildings (more than a couple of stories) without windows slightly disconcerting: factories, granaries and the like. I don't know why but it's not because I'm thinking there's spectral activity going on.
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Old 17th December 2017, 12:22 PM   #5
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This idea makes a lot of sense. I've had occasion to be in large office and industrial buildings when they are closed or abandoned. Often a very odd "spooky" feeling to them. The lack of something you expect to be there could well be the cause, similar to the startlement when a constant background noise (like a ventilator) stops. You didn't really notice when it was there, but it feels wrong when it's gone.
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Old 17th December 2017, 05:18 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
Humans evolved during times when large enclosed spaces were rare. If you came upon a cave someone or something was sure to be living there. You expected to see some human, hominid or animal occupying the cave or whatever.
I'm sure this is part of the problem. There is something to be said for prehistoric/evolutionary conditioning. Combine this with cultural conditioning(folk tales, movies, etc) and it's no wonder large empty buildings develop reputations for being haunted.

If you think about it, they all have the same back stories where employees were killed in accidents (these are never confirmed), and later there are stories about street gangs/drug dealers/homeless people dying/murdered inside the buildings (again with no actual documentation). Over time these stories are shared without scrutiny of any kind, and are just accepted within the community where the building is located. Of course the stories of murder and mayhem get wilder over time, as do the ghost stories.

So by the time someone works up the courage to sneak inside one of these places they're expecting Freddy Kruger. Every noise is mysterious, hysteria takes over easily.
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Old 19th December 2017, 08:57 AM   #7
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If this were the case then I'd see ghosts all the time, considering I work and have worked in numerous places after hours and on my own, including hospitals and various old hospital wings under-construction, yet have seen absolutely sod-all.

Most people who see ghosts are either intentionally looking for them, and thus see them around every corner (same with UFO hunters, Bigfoot hunters and everything in between) or are simply mistaken, drunk, or under some type of mental strain.

The amount of supposedly haunted buildings I've been in at night, on my own, and have never seen so much as a bloody orb. Heard lots of things, same as I have in my own house at night when it's settling down, nothing supernatural, just average noises that ghost hunters would assume came from some spirit, because that's what ghost hunters do.

Outdoorsmen see prints in the mud; it's an animal. Bigfooters see prints; it's a Bigfoot. UFO hunters see an alien craft, normal sods see a weather balloon. And so it goes. On and on.

This "spooky feeling" is essentially a load of nonsense, and is just a person's natural unease in an empty yet otherwise harmless building, and is brought about via ghost stories and Horror movies, and a real-life awareness of general weirdos and murderers being out there.

People think about ghosts way too much, no wonder they're seeing them in every other nook and cranny of old, abandoned buildings.
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Old 19th December 2017, 09:24 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Gilbert Syndrome View Post
If this were the case then I'd see ghosts all the time, considering I work and have worked in numerous places after hours and on my own, including hospitals and various old hospital wings under-construction, yet have seen absolutely sod-all.

Most people who see ghosts are either intentionally looking for them, and thus see them around every corner (same with UFO hunters, Bigfoot hunters and everything in between) or are simply mistaken, drunk, or under some type of mental strain.

The amount of supposedly haunted buildings I've been in at night, on my own, and have never seen so much as a bloody orb. Heard lots of things, same as I have in my own house at night when it's settling down, nothing supernatural, just average noises that ghost hunters would assume came from some spirit, because that's what ghost hunters do.

Outdoorsmen see prints in the mud; it's an animal. Bigfooters see prints; it's a Bigfoot. UFO hunters see an alien craft, normal sods see a weather balloon. And so it goes. On and on.

This "spooky feeling" is essentially a load of nonsense, and is just a person's natural unease in an empty yet otherwise harmless building, and is brought about via ghost stories and Horror movies, and a real-life awareness of general weirdos and murderers being out there.

People think about ghosts way too much, no wonder they're seeing them in every other nook and cranny of old, abandoned buildings.
Like I said the only people who "see" ghosts are children and some adults. One woman claims she saw one but she had been working two jobs and this was her second one waitressing when the house was a restaurant.

I personally do not believe in ghosts but I do believe that primitive man was leery of largely enclosed places such as caves because of the possibility that these spaces may be occupied by something or someone dangerous whether it be a bear or a disgruntled Neanderthal man with a stone axe waiting in the darkness.

Some people are prone to hallucination whereas others are not. You and I are not.
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Old 19th December 2017, 09:52 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
Like I said the only people who "see" ghosts are children and some adults. One woman claims she saw one but she had been working two jobs and this was her second one waitressing when the house was a restaurant.

I personally do not believe in ghosts but I do believe that primitive man was leery of largely enclosed places such as caves because of the possibility that these spaces may be occupied by something or someone dangerous whether it be a bear or a disgruntled Neanderthal man with a stone axe waiting in the darkness.

Some people are prone to hallucination whereas others are not. You and I are not.
I'm sure plenty of people think they see ghosts. I've spoken to a bunch of them, from all walks of life, of many varied ages.

I just can't get on board with this as an explanation, considering the fact that ghosts are not just seen in abandoned buildings or empty spaces, but all over the place, and in frequently occupied buildings.

I think it's just down to the person, not the building. There are many reasons people think they see ghosts or apparitions, from superstition to them simply being highly suggestible.

So much of it has to do with a person already being exposed to such stories, and them being told they're entering a "haunted" place. If haunting's were truly a thing of reality, every square foot of the earth would likely be haunted, due to the amount of activity, "good and bad," that has gone on there, but this is rarely ever the case, and haunted places are usually pretty bog-standard on the ole spook-o-meter: graveyards, fields once used in battle, old houses, prisons, hospitals, mortuaries, etc.

When you look at ghost hunting, it generally consists of people running about old buildings in the dark, scaring themselves silly after droning on about some murder that took place there, or whatever else they spin to get themselves riled up for the hunt; basically foreplay.

When you have an environment like that, it's obvious that people will be seeing and hearing all manner of normal crap that they'll undoubtedly believe to be supernatural in origin.

For me, like Nessie and Bigfoot, a major factor in ghosts is people. We create them, we fear them, we talk about them and then we inevitably "see" and hear them.

We haunt ourselves.
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Old 19th December 2017, 02:46 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Gilbert Syndrome View Post
I'm sure plenty of people think they see ghosts. I've spoken to a bunch of them, from all walks of life, of many varied ages.

I just can't get on board with this as an explanation, considering the fact that ghosts are not just seen in abandoned buildings or empty spaces, but all over the place, and in frequently occupied buildings.

I think it's just down to the person, not the building. There are many reasons people think they see ghosts or apparitions, from superstition to them simply being highly suggestible.

So much of it has to do with a person already being exposed to such stories, and them being told they're entering a "haunted" place. If haunting's were truly a thing of reality, every square foot of the earth would likely be haunted, due to the amount of activity, "good and bad," that has gone on there, but this is rarely ever the case, and haunted places are usually pretty bog-standard on the ole spook-o-meter: graveyards, fields once used in battle, old houses, prisons, hospitals, mortuaries, etc.

When you look at ghost hunting, it generally consists of people running about old buildings in the dark, scaring themselves silly after droning on about some murder that took place there, or whatever else they spin to get themselves riled up for the hunt; basically foreplay.

When you have an environment like that, it's obvious that people will be seeing and hearing all manner of normal crap that they'll undoubtedly believe to be supernatural in origin.

For me, like Nessie and Bigfoot, a major factor in ghosts is people. We create them, we fear them, we talk about them and then we inevitably "see" and hear them.

We haunt ourselves.
I agree and I couldn't have described the phenomena more accurately. Thank you.
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Old 20th December 2017, 07:30 AM   #11
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I understand this sort of thing is an area of research that Richard Wiseman is working on. The subjective feeling of "spookiness" is real but ghosts are [assumed] not [to be].
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Old 20th December 2017, 04:49 PM   #12
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Can anyone point to documentation from non-Western cultures that show the same phenomena -- not the ghosts, but the belief in them and the sightings of ... something ... in similar settings?
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Old 20th December 2017, 04:56 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Can anyone point to documentation from non-Western cultures that show the same phenomena -- not the ghosts, but the belief in them and the sightings of ... something ... in similar settings?
Good question, I believe Asia and Japan have similar traditions about spirits in buildings, but then they also have similar traditions of building large, permanent, structures. I'd be really interested in traditions relating to nomadic cultures in this respect. Haunted Yurts?
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Old 27th December 2017, 11:42 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Can anyone point to documentation from non-Western cultures that show the same phenomena -- not the ghosts, but the belief in them and the sightings of ... something ... in similar settings?
Many countries around the world share the same typical archetypal ghosts and phantoms as we do. It's generally the same regarding "haunted places." Changi prison, in Singapore, is a renowned hotbed of supernatural activity, like many of our Western prisons are supposed to be, and it's the same for all other manner of typical haunted places.

Ghosts/spirits are pretty much a worldwide thing, for many cultures. The settings are mostly the same, too. It's a human thing, not really a regional thing.
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Old 27th December 2017, 11:45 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
Good question, I believe Asia and Japan have similar traditions about spirits in buildings, but then they also have similar traditions of building large, permanent, structures. I'd be really interested in traditions relating to nomadic cultures in this respect. Haunted Yurts?
With stretches of sea, land and desert said to be haunted the world over, it's a far-reaching thing.

There are stories of ghosts attached to almost every place on earth, and I say "almost" because I can't verify that it's actually everywhere, but it honestly wouldn't surprise me to learn that it was. From ghosts beneath the waves at shipwrecks, to ghosts in castles, houses, hospitals, prisons, caves, mountains, lakes, forests, fields, etc, etc; it's as common as muck.
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Old 27th December 2017, 12:52 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
Good question, I believe Asia and Japan have similar traditions about spirits in buildings, but then they also have similar traditions of building large, permanent, structures. I'd be really interested in traditions relating to nomadic cultures in this respect. Haunted Yurts?
Nomadic cultures tend to have mobile spirits. The Bedouin have the Jinn for example. Their superstitions mix with their mythologies due to their keeping of oral traditions, which is charming, but not always helpful.

Ancient temples being patrolled by vengeful spirits and curses goes all the way back. It was a great way to keep people from sneaking in and stealing things.

Ghosts were used for public safety, example: people get lost/eaten by bears in the nearby forest. Solution? Forest is haunted.

The irony being that today most people don't believe in ghosts, but still do stupid things around bears.

Go figure.
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Old 28th December 2017, 07:28 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
Proof that even the dead have standards?
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Old 28th April 2019, 06:35 PM   #18
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As we speak I'm living alone in a house that for forty-seven years was occupied by three people. No ghost sightings but the bumps in the night and sometimes in the days are a bit more disconcerting.
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Old 28th April 2019, 06:49 PM   #19
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Nice idea. Fascinating.
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Old 29th April 2019, 05:22 AM   #20
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I’m aware of experiments where small groups of people were taken to old homes under various pretexts.... If the group were told by the “guide” that the place had a reputation for being haunted, at least some of the participants would report some sort of “incident”.....Noises, footsteps, whatever.

If a similar group was not so informed.... No incidents.

We have a building on campus, the old Chancellor’s residence, that’s been reputedly haunted for many years. Now and again, the burglar alarm would go off for no apparent reason (hardly unusual). So we’re checking the place one night and the reason for the alarms becomes apparent.... A bat has taken up residence in the place.
We had officers who refused to go into the place.
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Old 29th April 2019, 06:36 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
As we speak I'm living alone in a house that for forty-seven years was occupied by three people. No ghost sightings but the bumps in the night and sometimes in the days are a bit more disconcerting.
I wouldn't worry about it, old houses tend to make lots of noises. Once you've been there for a while, you'll find that you're going to get used to the noises and will probably even come to expect them.

If, however, one dark, cold night, all of the familiar noises seem to cease at once, and the house is enveloped in total silence, to the point that it's almost too silent, so silent you can reach out and touch it... then it's time to be disconcerted.
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Old 29th April 2019, 06:45 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Bikewer View Post
I’m aware of experiments where small groups of people were taken to old homes under various pretexts.... If the group were told by the “guide” that the place had a reputation for being haunted, at least some of the participants would report some sort of “incident”.....Noises, footsteps, whatever.

If a similar group was not so informed.... No incidents.

We have a building on campus, the old Chancellor’s residence, that’s been reputedly haunted for many years. Now and again, the burglar alarm would go off for no apparent reason (hardly unusual). So we’re checking the place one night and the reason for the alarms becomes apparent.... A bat has taken up residence in the place.
We had officers who refused to go into the place.
This was done on a rigged set, IRRC, on a show I've now forgotten the name of.

One group of people were brought in and given a hokey story, and they went along with it and saw all manner of things that weren't there, and another group were given the same treatment without the story and obviously reported nothing.

We, as people, are tuned into our surroundings, even though this has been dulled over the years from our modern environment and our much-loved technology. If you wander into a big old empty building at dusk, your senses aren't going crazy because there may be a mysterious and creepy lady in white flitting through the dusty halls; they're going crazy because you're naturally worrying about potential dangers and the fact that this is essentially an unknown and unfamiliar place to be in.

Yes, creepy old buildings are creepy at night, but that's because it's obviously going to be creepy, considering all the many years of myth, legend and nonsense we've all come to know and love, rattling about in our noggins like the chains of a ghost. The real dangers of such empty, abandoned, potentially hazardous places, are what we're actually wary of.

Similarly, when you're out strolling through the woods and you get a funny feeling coming over you that you're being watched, that's more than likely your brain's natural way of telling you to be careful, I mean, you're in the woods, y'know, lol. We're hardwired, like pigeons, to crap ourselves and run, or stand and do battle, fight or flight. Adrenaline. That's all it is. It's how we survive and live to tell another daft tale about spooky ghosts.
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Old 29th April 2019, 12:01 PM   #23
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The house I lived in for 40 years, was built in 1890. The couple I bought it from had a party there one night, and the wife was murdered, beaten to death by her husband and 3 other male guests. When they realized she was dead, the put her in the car and tossed her body out.

It was big news in such a small town, a small remote country town, population of 1100. Visitors always spoke of the murder, and claimed to feel her tormented last moments. One friend refused to stay the night.

44 years I lived there. Not once did I feel or suspect any paranormal activity, in spite of others insisting. Never.


Perhaps I am not very sensitive.
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Old 29th April 2019, 12:09 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
As we speak I'm living alone in a house that for forty-seven years was occupied by three people. No ghost sightings but the bumps in the night and sometimes in the days are a bit more disconcerting.
My house was built in the 80s, I have very little idea who has lived in it previously and it makes all sorts of noises. None of them are disconcerting.
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Old 29th April 2019, 12:24 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
Searching every nook and cranny of this building I have come to believe certain people see ghosts there because they feel someone should be there occupying all the empty spaces.


I think, as mid-level scavengers, we've evolved a pretty strong inclination to believe that something is stalking us. As social animals we also tend to interpret pretty much any unknown in anthropic terms. The outcome is a belief in ghosts.

Judging by how often dogs bark at absolutely nothing, I expect that they're falsely sensing ghosts all the damn time.
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Old 29th April 2019, 09:10 PM   #26
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I used to live in wood frame houses. Day to night temp changes to humidity changes making the structure move and creak. I admit in a couple of them the noises could be unnerving.
But we knew what it was, so really no ghost stories from us.

Now I live in a cement house. Nothing moves. A window may rattle in a storm but no wood structure noise at all.
Living here brought past ideas to a new light and now it seems silly. I even planned the lighting to avoid tricks of the shadows and peripheral vision to be avoided. Evenly lit rooms are comfortable rooms.

Because my young son could not go to the kitchen alone at night for a drink. He has matured some and now can with confidence. Nothing scares him now even going through an unlit room. His mother isn't as brave after dark.

Those no-see-um things that lurk in the crevices are only as dangerous as we make them.
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Old 30th April 2019, 06:18 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
The house I lived in for 40 years, was built in 1890. The couple I bought it from had a party there one night, and the wife was murdered, beaten to death by her husband and 3 other male guests. When they realized she was dead, the put her in the car and tossed her body out.

It was big news in such a small town, a small remote country town, population of 1100. Visitors always spoke of the murder, and claimed to feel her tormented last moments. One friend refused to stay the night.

44 years I lived there. Not once did I feel or suspect any paranormal activity, in spite of others insisting. Never.


Perhaps I am not very sensitive.
Something a lot of us tend to overlook when we think about sites where a terrible murder or death have taken place, is that most of the globe we reside on has seen some form of brutal murder, or mundane death, at some point during history.

The ground we walk on day after day must be riddled with grim stories, yet we don't tend to see headless phantoms just strolling down the high street, wandering past the chip shop.
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Old 30th April 2019, 06:44 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
The couple I bought it from had a party there one night, and the wife was murdered, beaten to death by her husband and 3 other male guests.

I don't understand this part of your story: The wife of the couple you bought it from was murdered but still able to sell the house to you?!
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Old 15th June 2019, 09:17 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Gilbert Syndrome View Post
If this were the case then I'd see ghosts all the time, considering I work and have worked in numerous places after hours and on my own, including hospitals and various old hospital wings under-construction, yet have seen absolutely sod-all.

Most people who see ghosts are either intentionally looking for them, and thus see them around every corner (same with UFO hunters, Bigfoot hunters and everything in between) or are simply mistaken, drunk, or under some type of mental strain.

The amount of supposedly haunted buildings I've been in at night, on my own, and have never seen so much as a bloody orb. Heard lots of things, same as I have in my own house at night when it's settling down, nothing supernatural, just average noises that ghost hunters would assume came from some spirit, because that's what ghost hunters do.

Outdoorsmen see prints in the mud; it's an animal. Bigfooters see prints; it's a Bigfoot. UFO hunters see an alien craft, normal sods see a weather balloon. And so it goes. On and on.

This "spooky feeling" is essentially a load of nonsense, and is just a person's natural unease in an empty yet otherwise harmless building, and is brought about via ghost stories and Horror movies, and a real-life awareness of general weirdos and murderers being out there.

People think about ghosts way too much, no wonder they're seeing them in every other nook and cranny of old, abandoned buildings.
Well, you aren't susceptible to seeing things that aren't there. I personally would be very reluctant to enter a supposed unoccupied building in a bad part of town.
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Old 15th June 2019, 10:26 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Cainkane1 View Post
Well, you aren't susceptible to seeing things that aren't there. I personally would be very reluctant to enter a supposed unoccupied building in a bad part of town.
Today, if I'm in an abandoned building, if I hear something moving I'm not thinking it's a ghost, I'm thinking it's a junkie. In fact if I see just one syringe on the floor I'm turning around and getting out of there. Most Urban Explorers I know don't believe in ghosts, and some have even stopped believing in them because of this peculiar hobby. Abandoned buildings become an adventure where fear is conquered. The byproduct is the taming of the subconscious, the only ghosts in these places are the ones you bring with you as your imagination tries to recreate how you think life was like back when the place you're exploring was functional.

Junkies, on the other hand, seem to be everywhere these days.
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Old 15th June 2019, 11:03 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by dann View Post
I don't understand this part of your story: The wife of the couple you bought it from was murdered but still able to sell the house to you?!
Sorry, I just now saw your question.

Apparently, his family actually had bought the house for him. It was on the market for a long time. I bought the house and property from them, for $10,000 dollars.

When I sold it, years later, it sold for $260,000. What surprised me was the agent said the murder still had to be disclosed.
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Old 15th June 2019, 02:57 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
When I sold it, years later, it sold for $260,000. What surprised me was the agent said the murder still had to be disclosed.
Based on what rationale?
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Old 15th June 2019, 03:08 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Minoosh View Post
Based on what rationale?

I wish I could better recall, but it seems there was something about the number of years following the murder, but I am not positive. Sorry.
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Old 15th June 2019, 05:37 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Minoosh View Post
Based on what rationale?
In California, Alaska, and South Dakota you are required by law to disclose any death that has occurred in a house being sold:

https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/...th-in-a-house/

https://www.redfin.com/resources/dea...use-disclosure

Sometimes these laws are superstition-related, but in the can of murder/suicide houses there can be a gawker factor with cars slowing as people look at the house, or get out to take pictures. This is one of the reasons they tore down the Sharon Tate murder house at 10050 Cielo Drive.
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Old 15th June 2019, 05:47 PM   #35
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Good thing they didn't have that in Washington when we sold my parents' house. We did have to disclose the urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, which cost us a sale.
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Old 15th June 2019, 06:11 PM   #36
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A paranormal type show seeks out the places deaths happened. A surprising number of them have been abandoned after the events.

Mexico is a bit superstitious and the building is left to decay after locals steal the doors and furniture. Nobody seems to want even the land under the house, should it be leveled.
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Old 15th June 2019, 07:28 PM   #37
wasapi
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Originally Posted by Axxman300 View Post
In California, Alaska, and South Dakota you are required by law to disclose any death that has occurred in a house being sold:

https://www.realtor.com/advice/sell/...th-in-a-house/

https://www.redfin.com/resources/dea...use-disclosure

Sometimes these laws are superstition-related, but in the can of murder/suicide houses there can be a gawker factor with cars slowing as people look at the house, or get out to take pictures. This is one of the reasons they tore down the Sharon Tate murder house at 10050 Cielo Drive.
Thank you. I could not recall if it was for a future-number of years, a set period of time. In California it appears that it exists to this day.
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Old 15th June 2019, 09:49 PM   #38
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At some point recently I heard an interesting suggestion that some spaces are thought haunted because of undetected carbon monoxide.
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Old 15th June 2019, 10:06 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
At some point recently I heard an interesting suggestion that some spaces are thought haunted because of undetected carbon monoxide.
Absolutely.

Here's Carry Poppy talking about her experience in a haunted house:

https://www.ted.com/talks/carrie_pop...al?language=en

Spoiler alert: It was carbon monoxide poisoning.

For all of the worthless gadgets ghost hunters carry around today, CO2 detectors are not usually one of them, even though it's the only sensing device proven to work, and cuts to the root of most hauntings.
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Old 16th June 2019, 07:15 AM   #40
bruto
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Originally Posted by Axxman300 View Post
Absolutely.

Here's Carry Poppy talking about her experience in a haunted house:

https://www.ted.com/talks/carrie_pop...al?language=en

Spoiler alert: It was carbon monoxide poisoning.

For all of the worthless gadgets ghost hunters carry around today, CO2 detectors are not usually one of them, even though it's the only sensing device proven to work, and cuts to the root of most hauntings.
Thanks for the link. I download a bunch of podcast stuff and listen when I exercise, but tend to forget what I've heard and where.
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