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Old 20th October 2017, 06:05 PM   #41
Craig4
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Sometimes I reread "The Prince". I find the amorality soothing.
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Old 20th October 2017, 10:20 PM   #42
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I re-read books all the time. I will admit that at times I will skim certain areas of the book that I've already read a million times, but I love to re-read books. I always find little tidbits I missed for some reason before, or get reminded of how much I loved a character or storyline. Re-reading books is soothing to me, and books are such old friends to me that I'd consider it a betrayal of my favorites if I didn't re-read them periodically.

I'm re-reading a series right now, actually.
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Old 21st October 2017, 02:17 AM   #43
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I have various favourites I've re-read several times partly through lazyness and the comfort of the known. I read quickly, skimming through novels in particular, so I may miss stuff the first time around. On the other hand, there's quite a few I've started and given up after a few chapters, picking up again later on (in some cases, years).

More recently, I've downloaded some older stuff from Gutenberg (Conan Doyle, Lovecraft, Buchan) and spent some time fixing up the plain versions to an HTML copy I can read comfortably, so I'm more intimate with those texts.
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Old 22nd October 2017, 12:43 AM   #44
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Nothing wrong with revisiting a good book, for comfort reading.
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Old 22nd October 2017, 01:08 AM   #45
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There are books that I'll re-visit as a whole from time-to-time, and there are certain things I read when I need to escape from stress - The P.J. O'Rourke piece from National Lampoon How To Drive Fast on Drugs while getting your wing-wang squeezed and not spill your drink:

http://www.heretical.com/miscella/reptile.html

And the first chapter of the Joe R. Lansdale book Bad Chili usually does the trick.
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Old 22nd October 2017, 01:32 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Tomtomkent View Post
Nothing wrong with revisiting a good book, for comfort reading.
Absolutely. I often re-read books and I was one of those people who would re-read LOTR each year. But, technology moves on and now 90+% of my "reading" is by audiobooks and I often re-listen to books, including LOTR.

The other thing I really like about re-listening to books is that if it is a familiar read it really helps me drift off to sleep
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Old 23rd October 2017, 07:37 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
I find re-reading a book to be a very different experience to reading it for the first time, and I enjoy both in different ways. I'm currently re-reading Charlie Stross's "The Rhesus Factor", and finding it both more comprehensible - because I understand from the beginning the mechanism of vampirism that he unveils rather gradually throughout the story - and more familiar because I've read "The Nightmare Stacks" which centres on the same lead character and let me get to know him in more detail. The first read is great for the sense of wonder, like the first day in a new country when you're simply taking in the sights and sounds without really putting them into context; re-reading is more like exploring the back streets of a place I've been before, learning to appreciate the detail and how everything fits together. And then there's re-reading a familiar book after many years, which has the sense of recovered familiarity and occasional pleasant surprises when I pick up something that had escaped my attention for years. Reading a good book just once seems like a waste.

Dave
Well said. I find re-reading a book (or rewatching a movie), that I often enjoy it more than the first time. Knowing where the plot is going allows me to focus more on the details (and foreshadowing) that I might miss the first time through.
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Old 24th October 2017, 01:55 AM   #48
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There used to be a time when I read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy once a year.
And I have read American Gods three or four times.
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Old 25th October 2017, 08:32 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Faydra View Post
I know a lot of people who will go back and re-read a book - they consider them old friends.

I have never been able to do this.

Once I've read it, I'm done.

Strangely, I have no problem watching a movie over again.

But I have never, not even once, re-read a book.

Also, is re-read one word, two or hyphenated? re-read. reread. re read.

Do you re-read books?
Yes I find it odd and difficult to re-read a book. I have done so only for Dune (after a break of 30 years), Caesar's commentaries, Storm of Steel by Ernst Junger, and Confederacy of Dunces, I'm presently attempting to do so with a number of classic archaeological books but finding it difficult.
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Old 25th October 2017, 11:19 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
I probably read 3 to 4 books a week and more if I'm on holiday then it would reach perhaps 1 or 2 books a day.
Originally Posted by xterra View Post
During summer vacations when I was in high school, I read between 15 and 20 books a week. That was in addition to working at my family's grocery store, and cutting lawns in the neigborhood.

At age 75, I still read about 100 pages an hour for most fiction. I usually have two or three books on the go at once.

When I was reading professional material, that could drop to as little as 15 pages an hour, depending on the material. Now? I very rarely read anything related to my profession, but I continue to read lots of non-fiction.

Obviously, one's reading rate depends on the material and the writer. I mentioned John McPhee, whose writing style never interferes with the information. Other writers are ... less transparent.
I'm a slow reader and only read about 10 hours or less a week, wish I had more time. I'd say that 100 pages in most books takes me 2 or 3 hours. I usually read when I go to bed, but I'm usually exhausted so often it's only 15-20 minutes and I'm nodding off, so it can take weeks for me to finish a big book.
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Old 25th October 2017, 03:58 PM   #51
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It's interesting how many of the answers are TLOTR, but I've only skimmed & skipped through it, because I liked the story but not the writing. I guess that the shortage of other fantasy novels to choose from would explain TLOTR's prominence at first, but by the time I was reading things like that, there was so much other fantasy to choose from that I had no clue which to try. That was part of how I ended up reading The Silmarillion, because at least I knew something about what to expect from it. It ended up being the only thing I can think of that I've read more than once (actually thrice), because there was so much stuff packed in there so densely that some of it felt "new" to me each time.
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Old 26th October 2017, 11:41 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
It's interesting how many of the answers are TLOTR, but I've only skimmed & skipped through it, because I liked the story but not the writing. I guess that the shortage of other fantasy novels to choose from would explain TLOTR's prominence at first, but by the time I was reading things like that, there was so much other fantasy to choose from that I had no clue which to try. That was part of how I ended up reading The Silmarillion, because at least I knew something about what to expect from it. It ended up being the only thing I can think of that I've read more than once (actually thrice), because there was so much stuff packed in there so densely that some of it felt "new" to me each time.
I could never get through LOTR even once, never made it through 2 chapters. Most books capture me by the first half chapter. LOTR did not do that for me. It's been over 25 years since I've last tried, I might just give it another go.
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Old 26th October 2017, 02:58 PM   #53
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The graphic novel Watchmen benifits from multiple readings. There is just too much to pick up on the first time around.

Originally Posted by Spindrift View Post
I could never get through LOTR even once, never made it through 2 chapters. Most books capture me by the first half chapter. LOTR did not do that for me. It's been over 25 years since I've last tried, I might just give it another go.
I have to wonder if anyone ever reads the entire Ent song?

(Never mind, I'm sure it's already been set to filk music and YouTubed.)
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Old 26th October 2017, 07:25 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
I re-read most books. If I don't re-read it I didn't like it much.

I've read LOTR at least a dozen times, but it's been a while now. I'd been through it at least twice before graduating from college, when it had only just become popular.

I'm currently re-reading the Discworld series, which I just read the first time last year.
Nassim Taleb has a quote that says that you should not read a book that you wouldn't reread.

For savvy readers, that makes sense entirely. It is possible to know whether a book is reread material before you even start with incredible certainty.

I reread all of Dostoievsky major novels very decade. Many books I have not reread, but the fact that I keep them in my library indicates that I intend to someday, otherwise I'd have donated them.
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Old 27th October 2017, 01:22 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by Spindrift View Post
I could never get through LOTR even once, never made it through 2 chapters.
I've heard it said that chapter 2 is the most likely place to give up on LOTR (given that the whole point of the chapter is to retcon The Hobbit into JRRT's earlier Middle Earth mythos, rather than, you know, telling a story), with chapter 1 of book 2 the second most likely. It's worth trying again; once the Fellowship leave Rivendell, the pace picks up, and it's a wild ride from there to the end.

Dave
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Old 27th October 2017, 01:31 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
It's interesting how many of the answers are TLOTR, but I've only skimmed & skipped through it, because I liked the story but not the writing. I guess that the shortage of other fantasy novels to choose from would explain TLOTR's prominence at first, but by the time I was reading things like that, there was so much other fantasy to choose from that I had no clue which to try. That was part of how I ended up reading The Silmarillion, because at least I knew something about what to expect from it. It ended up being the only thing I can think of that I've read more than once (actually thrice), because there was so much stuff packed in there so densely that some of it felt "new" to me each time.
When it comes to fantasy, I don't find Tolkein to be that re-readable, but I have read Raymond Feist's Riftwar books about a half dozen times, and Anne McCaffrey's Pern series about the same. Pratchett of course - some of them into double figures easily.
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Old 27th October 2017, 01:57 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by Syameese View Post
Absolutely. I often re-read books and I was one of those people who would re-read LOTR each year. But, technology moves on and now 90+% of my "reading" is by audiobooks and I often re-listen to books, including LOTR.

The other thing I really like about re-listening to books is that if it is a familiar read it really helps me drift off to sleep
In the last year I've hardly "read" a book, but have listened to about 100 audiobooks. I'm re-reading (hearing) one now, Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons. I'm going through a vampire stage now. I'm impressed by the literary quality of this genre.
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Old 27th October 2017, 08:26 AM   #58
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Unoriginally...
The Hobbit and LOTR: on vacation every 8 or 10 years.
The Black Company books: on about the same schedule.
Dragon Riders of Pern (series): We would listen every 5(ish) years on long drives, particularly when the kids were younger;
Star Trek: Also audio, to torture said kids
Foundation: Also usually audio, sometimes when just need something quick to pass the time;
Dark Rivers of the Heart: always listen on a long trip, about 8 years apart. We've taken trips just so we can listen.
A couple Mel Odom fantasy, perhaps 2 or 3 others I can't recall right now.
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Old 27th October 2017, 09:07 AM   #59
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The Pern books were a series that my whole family took turns reading at first. But she just kept churning out more and more of them to an extent that was impossible to keep up with. The original two trilogies and I think two or three more non-grouped novels in the series, that I have read, are probably about a twentieth of the complete series by now.
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Old 28th October 2017, 04:25 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
It's interesting how many of the answers are TLOTR, but I've only skimmed & skipped through it, because I liked the story but not the writing. I guess that the shortage of other fantasy novels to choose from would explain TLOTR's prominence at first, but by the time I was reading things like that, there was so much other fantasy to choose from that I had no clue which to try. That was part of how I ended up reading The Silmarillion, because at least I knew something about what to expect from it. It ended up being the only thing I can think of that I've read more than once (actually thrice), because there was so much stuff packed in there so densely that some of it felt "new" to me each time.
Testify.

At least the poetry is in italics, which means that can be easily skipped.
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Old 31st October 2017, 07:17 AM   #61
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I do re-read books occasionally. I find myself frequently in two basic modes:

1) I rush through the book, just reminding myself of the basic plot, side stories and scenes. In particular if some of those elements have been skipped or changed by an adaptation.

2) I go really slow, and concentrate on small details that I may have missed in earlier readings. Again, there's frequently a connection to adaptations that either have changed details (gender, ethnicity, physical attributes of characters, to name examples), or stayed surprisingly true to such details (which for some reason I missed when reading).
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Old 31st October 2017, 08:59 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
I've heard it said that chapter 2 is the most likely place to give up on LOTR (given that the whole point of the chapter is to retcon The Hobbit into JRRT's earlier Middle Earth mythos, rather than, you know, telling a story), with chapter 1 of book 2 the second most likely.
I completely read the first book, thinking it just HAD to get better since it was so popular. But at that break I had no incentive at all to keep plowing onward..

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Old 1st November 2017, 06:53 AM   #63
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Yes, LOTR too. But also "The Wind in the Willows" by Kenneth Grahame is a perennial and earlier this year I re-read all of the Falco books by Lindsey Davis.
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Old 3rd November 2017, 08:18 PM   #64
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Doing 1-on-1 reading with the 2nd-grade kids in the library. One kid grabbed a book at random off the shelf and I said, “I bet I can tell you the first three words of the story without even looking.” He opened it, I said them, and he was properly amazed!

The three words? “Call me Ishmael.”
The book? “Moby Dick”, of course.
(I saw the title.)
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