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Old 6th September 2019, 05:35 PM   #1
dudalb
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WW2 era C-47 to fly rescue mission in the Bahamas...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/hu...cid=spartandhp



Looks as if that old saying about the C 47/Dakota is true:

'You can wreck a C 47, but you can't wear it out".


Just more proof why the DC-3 is considered by many aviation historian to be one of the greatest planes in the history of aviation.
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Old 6th September 2019, 06:31 PM   #2
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I might take issue with "one of".
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Old 6th September 2019, 07:09 PM   #3
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I wonder how much of the plane has been replaced during its lifetime?

Like if a plane has 1,000 parts and you replace all 1,000 parts over time then is it the same plane? And if you took those 1,000 discarded parts and reassembled them (say in a museum) would that be the original plane? If the answer to the first question is no then at what point does it cease to be the original plane?
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Old 6th September 2019, 08:22 PM   #4
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The airframe number tag defines the original craft. The castoff parts are never going to pass as airworthy again.
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Old 7th September 2019, 04:00 AM   #5
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Awesome work, those teams. And that plane is older than Trump yet it has already done more relief work than him.
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Old 7th September 2019, 09:17 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by rjh01 View Post
I wonder how much of the plane has been replaced during its lifetime?

Like if a plane has 1,000 parts and you replace all 1,000 parts over time then is it the same plane? And if you took those 1,000 discarded parts and reassembled them (say in a museum) would that be the original plane? If the answer to the first question is no then at what point does it cease to be the original plane?
Ship of Theseus, Trigger's Broom, Granddaddy's Axe. For the latter, the handle's been replaced six times and the head twice, but it's the same axe.

In this case, I would expect much of the original airframe to still be there.
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Old 7th September 2019, 11:54 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by rjh01 View Post
I wonder how much of the plane has been replaced during its lifetime?

Like if a plane has 1,000 parts and you replace all 1,000 parts over time then is it the same plane? And if you took those 1,000 discarded parts and reassembled them (say in a museum) would that be the original plane? If the answer to the first question is no then at what point does it cease to be the original plane?
I think the real question is, if we swap out all the parts for new ones have we actually solved the teleportation problem?
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Old 7th September 2019, 06:36 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Elagabalus View Post
I think the real question is, if we swap out all the parts for new ones have we actually solved the teleportation problem?
This is something discussed in this thread Is DMT the answer to the teleportation problem?
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Old 7th September 2019, 08:05 PM   #9
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The chance to fly one more real mission. A dream come true.
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Old 8th September 2019, 06:25 PM   #10
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...and the life of the C47 is not over.

There are companies refurbishing them, extending the fuselage, strengthening the wing centre section and replacing the the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 radial engines with PT6 turbo-props

https://www.dc3dakotahunter.com/blog...-fly-soon-die/
  • Max. Payload goes from 3,5 to 5 tons.
  • Internal loading space 35 % increase.
  • Max Takeoff weight goes up from 25,200 to 29,000 lbs.
  • Engine Overhauls are needed only after every 6,000 flight hours. compared with 1,200 for the radial engines.
  • Cruising speed up from 160 to 200 knots


From the perspective of an Aeronautical Engineer like myself, this is just awesome!
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Old 9th September 2019, 02:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by smartcooky View Post
...and the life of the C47 is not over.

There are companies refurbishing them, extending the fuselage, strengthening the wing centre section and replacing the the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 radial engines with PT6 turbo-props

https://www.dc3dakotahunter.com/blog...-fly-soon-die/
  • Max. Payload goes from 3,5 to 5 tons.
  • Internal loading space 35 % increase.
  • Max Takeoff weight goes up from 25,200 to 29,000 lbs.
  • Engine Overhauls are needed only after every 6,000 flight hours. compared with 1,200 for the radial engines.
  • Cruising speed up from 160 to 200 knots


From the perspective of an Aeronautical Engineer like myself, this is just awesome!
The C 47 is the one of the few WW2 era planes that is still used fairly widely on a day to day business basis,(Ie not as as part of an aerial museum, though some C-47 are, of course used for that purpose).
Only modern day plane that seems to be headed toward that level of longivity is the C 130 Herky Bird, which I think is still being manufactured in the "J" version. The J version is just the classic late 50's designed Herky bird with modern day electronics.
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Old 9th September 2019, 03:55 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
The C 47 is the one of the few WW2 era planes that is still used fairly widely on a day to day business basis,(Ie not as as part of an aerial museum, though some C-47 are, of course used for that purpose).
Only modern day plane that seems to be headed toward that level of longivity is the C 130 Herky Bird, which I think is still being manufactured in the "J" version. The J version is just the classic late 50's designed Herky bird with modern day electronics.

....and I am proud to say that I have had the privilege of being involved in the repair, maintenance and operations of both these outstanding aircraft.
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Last edited by smartcooky; 9th September 2019 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 9th September 2019, 04:56 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
The C 47 is the one of the few WW2 era planes that is still used fairly widely on a day to day business basis,(Ie not as as part of an aerial museum, though some C-47 are, of course used for that purpose).
Only modern day plane that seems to be headed toward that level of longivity is the C 130 Herky Bird, which I think is still being manufactured in the "J" version. The J version is just the classic late 50's designed Herky bird with modern day electronics.
And engines.

What the DC-3/C-47 has going for it is sheer numbers. Over 10,000 C-47's built, and 600+ commercial DC-3's.

I expect we'll see 737's flying for a long time as well. Just not the Max version.
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Old 9th September 2019, 07:15 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
...snip...The J version is just the classic late 50's designed Herky bird with modern day electronics.
And new engines and props. The newest version of the Alison reduction gearbox still goes in between (its' basic design goes back to the XP-39 in 1937).
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Old 11th September 2019, 09:03 AM   #15
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There's a fair few vintage 1950's designs still flying around, although most of them have been updated and upgraded along the way.
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Old 11th September 2019, 10:35 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by KDLarsen View Post
There's a fair few vintage 1950's designs still flying around, although most of them have been updated and upgraded along the way.
The B-52, for example...
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Old 11th September 2019, 11:24 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by KDLarsen View Post
There's a fair few vintage 1950's designs still flying around, although most of them have been updated and upgraded along the way.
Many 1950s designs still in military use, often with significant modifications. B-52, KC-135, P-3, 707 (as E-3, E-8, KC-707 etc.), Cessna 150 and 172, and so on. Acknowledging bias in advance, I point to the C-130 <<< as extraordinary in being an early 1950s design that is not only still in service, but still in production 65 years on.
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