ISF Logo   IS Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology
 


Welcome to the International Skeptics Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.
Reply
Old 8th January 2019, 06:49 PM   #281
Delvo
الشيطان الأبيض
 
Delvo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Posts: 7,814
For small critters, the usual thing scientists think first is riding piles of storm debris like a raft.
Delvo is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 06:55 PM   #282
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
Cool, I'll see what I can dig up.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 06:56 PM   #283
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
For small critters, the usual thing scientists think first is riding piles of storm debris like a raft.
Yeah, I'm mostly curious around when it would have happened.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 09:30 PM   #284
Dr. Keith
Not a doctor.
 
Dr. Keith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 18,200
Originally Posted by JoeMorgue View Post
- The fact that if you well shuffle a standard deck of cards you've with near certainty created an order of cards that have never before appeared in the universe.
I think any nerd who likes cards knows that 52! is a pretty huge number. Big numbers are so hard to grasp though.

I saw recently that the number of possible shuffles for a standard deck of cards is actually greater than the number of atoms that comprise the planet earth.

I also saw someone playing a solitaire game that tracked player stats. Some games were random and others were previously played by others. I mused about them using humans to build a database of solved solitaire games. Knowing that solitaire was one of the first computer games I started wondering about how long it would take for computers to solve all possible solitaire games. Throwing rough number at it I think I got to looking at how many lifetimes of the sun would it take for all current computing devices (something like 10 billion, IIRC) assuming they were optimized to solve a thousand games per second (although I found one article that it takes several seconds for computers to solve solitaire).

52! is just a really big number.
__________________
Suffering is not a punishment not a fruit of sin, it is a gift of God.
He allows us to share in His suffering and to make up for the sins of the world. -Mother Teresa

If I had a pet panda I would name it Snowflake.
Dr. Keith is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 10:10 PM   #285
novaphile
Quester of Doglets
Moderator
 
novaphile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,625
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Here's something that I learned yesterday that I didn't know.

The rakali is an Australian native rodent. They are endemic to my home town. I've even seen them. I assumed that they were rats.
Wow. I didn't know they were natives either.

I saw one up close once. I was sitting right next to the harbour at Cremorne Point (right next to the ferry wharf).

This critter swam out of the water and popped up onto the rocks about three feet away from me.

When it came out of the water, it looked like a drowned rat, but within a couple of minutes of grooming itself, it turned into this fluffy puffball.

After all that, it scampered off into the nearby undergrowth, passing so close to me I could have easily touched it on the way past...

At the time, I was guessing that it's vision was so poor, it may have been effectively blind. Now I'm wondering if its vision may be adapted for hunting underwater.
__________________
We would be better, and braver, to engage in enquiry, rather than indulge in the idle fancy, that we already know -- Plato.
novaphile is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 10:25 PM   #286
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 61,132
Yep. Turns out they're all over the bloody place and no-one realised because they look just like introduced rats.
__________________
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 10:49 PM   #287
xterra
So far, so good...
 
xterra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: On the outskirts of Nowhere; the middle was too crowded
Posts: 3,139
Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Wouldn't that mean that Great Auks are penguins and antarctic penguins aren't penguins, penguins just look like penguins?



Yes, it is a very aukward situation.




Properly knapped obsidian blades are sharper than scalpels. They were used for eye surgery, or so I have been told.
__________________
Over we go....
xterra is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 10:57 PM   #288
lionking
In the Peanut Gallery
 
lionking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 43,296
Originally Posted by xterra View Post

Properly knapped obsidian blades are sharper than scalpels. They were used for eye surgery, or so I have been told.
They do the job on White Walkers as well......
__________________
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.

Sir Winston Churchill
lionking is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 11:21 PM   #289
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
The terminal velocity of a cat is low enough that it's possible for cats to survive a fall from any height.

Of course, possible is probably the operative word here, and I don't know what the actual survival rate is from cats falling from extreme heights, but, still, pretty cool.

ETA: And given the way scaling laws work, I'd expect that for animals significantly smaller than cats (mice say?) there's no real danger to falls from any height. This is obviously true of insects, for instance, and not primarily because they have exoskeletons. Scaling laws are pretty cool in general.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov

Last edited by Roboramma; 8th January 2019 at 11:23 PM.
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th January 2019, 11:50 PM   #290
sir drinks-a-lot
Illuminator
 
sir drinks-a-lot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cole Valley, CA
Posts: 3,664
Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
The terminal velocity of a cat is low enough that it's possible for cats to survive a fall from any height.

Of course, possible is probably the operative word here, and I don't know what the actual survival rate is from cats falling from extreme heights, but, still, pretty cool.

ETA: And given the way scaling laws work, I'd expect that for animals significantly smaller than cats (mice say?) there's no real danger to falls from any height. This is obviously true of insects, for instance, and not primarily because they have exoskeletons. Scaling laws are pretty cool in general.
You may have seen it already, but On Being the Right Size by J. B. S. Haldane is a nice, quick read on the topic.
__________________
I drink to the general joy o' th' whole table. --William Shakespeare
sir drinks-a-lot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 01:02 AM   #291
This is The End
 
This is The End's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,711
Originally Posted by catsmate View Post
The ratio of the volumes of a cylinder, hemisphere and cone of equal base diameter and height is 3:2:1.

Do you mean sphere?
__________________
________________________
This is The End is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 01:45 AM   #292
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
You may have seen it already, but On Being the Right Size by J. B. S. Haldane is a nice, quick read on the topic.
Yeah, it's a classic. I had read it before, but thanks for posting it, definitely a good addition to the thread.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 02:36 AM   #293
3point14
Pi
 
3point14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 17,181
Originally Posted by Thor 2 View Post
I suppose you get off on the fact that centrifugal force does not exist then?

https://xkcd.com/123/
__________________
Up the River!

Anyone that wraps themselves in the Union Flag and also lives in tax exile is a [redacted]
3point14 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 02:39 AM   #294
Guybrush Threepwood
Trainee Pirate
 
Guybrush Threepwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: An Uaimh
Posts: 2,604
Originally Posted by This is The End
Originally Posted by catsmate View Post
The ratio of the volumes of a cylinder, hemisphere and cone of equal base diameter and height is 3:2:1.

Do you mean sphere?
No he means hemisphere: pi*r^3:2/3*Pi*r^3

Sphere would be 4:3:1 (sphere:cylinder:cone)

ETA. Actually I think its both sphere and hemisphere, because for a hemisphere the height of the cone and cylinder will be r, but for a sphere it will be 2r

Last edited by Guybrush Threepwood; 9th January 2019 at 03:42 AM.
Guybrush Threepwood is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:06 AM   #295
Dave Rogers
Bandaged ice that stampedes inexpensively through a scribbled morning waving necessary ankles
 
Dave Rogers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Cair Paravel, according to XKCD
Posts: 28,832
Originally Posted by 3point14 View Post
While we're on the subject of things learned from XKCD, one of my favourite scientific facts is that, if a there were a supernova at the same distance from the Earth as the Sun (not actually possible because the Sun isn't big enough), it would deliver more radiation energy to my retina than a hydrogen bomb pressed against my eyeball. By about nine orders of magnitude. And even the neutrino component of the radiation, at that distance, would be enough to kill me.

Dave
__________________
Me: So what you're saying is that, if the load carrying ability of the lower structure is reduced to the point where it can no longer support the load above it, it will collapse without a jolt, right?

Tony Szamboti: That is right
Dave Rogers is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:55 AM   #296
Porpoise of Life
Illuminator
 
Porpoise of Life's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 4,746
Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
ETA: And given the way scaling laws work, I'd expect that for animals significantly smaller than cats (mice say?) there's no real danger to falls from any height. This is obviously true of insects, for instance, and not primarily because they have exoskeletons. Scaling laws are pretty cool in general.
I recently watched a documentary about animal life in the city, and they showed a nest of ducklings (of 'fluffy yellow certainly-not-capable-of-flight age') jump from a 5th floor balcony and landing on the ground, and walking away perfectly unharmed.

Last edited by Porpoise of Life; 9th January 2019 at 03:56 AM.
Porpoise of Life is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:00 AM   #297
lionking
In the Peanut Gallery
 
lionking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 43,296
Originally Posted by Porpoise of Life View Post
I recently watched a documentary about animal life in the city, and they showed a nest of ducklings (of 'fluffy yellow certainly-not-capable-of-flight age') jump from a 5th floor balcony and landing on the ground, and walking away perfectly unharmed.
Maybe wings helped....
__________________
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.

Sir Winston Churchill
lionking is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:12 AM   #298
Belz...
Fiend God
 
Belz...'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: In the details
Posts: 80,584
I don't know if it's been mentioned, but the fact that your 'mind' is made aware of your decisions quite a while after the unconscious processes have made those decisions.

That one's quite the cold shower.
__________________
Master of the Shining Darkness

"My views are nonsense. So what?" - BobTheCoward


Belz... is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:48 AM   #299
theprestige
Penultimate Amazing
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 33,144
Originally Posted by Thor 2 View Post
One of my favourite scientific facts is imperfection.

Elliptical not circular orbits, spheroidal not spherical planets, spinning and orbital speeds slowing down and so on. I like this because it thumbs it's nose at religious claims of gods making perfect stuff.
Perfection is a subjective, aesthetic judgement.

"Ellipses are imperfect" is neither "scientific" nor a "fact".
theprestige is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 11:50 AM   #300
Trebuchet
Penultimate Amazing
 
Trebuchet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Northwet
Posts: 20,619
Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
The terminal velocity of a cat is low enough that it's possible for cats to survive a fall from any height.

Of course, possible is probably the operative word here, and I don't know what the actual survival rate is from cats falling from extreme heights, but, still, pretty cool.

ETA: And given the way scaling laws work, I'd expect that for animals significantly smaller than cats (mice say?) there's no real danger to falls from any height. This is obviously true of insects, for instance, and not primarily because they have exoskeletons. Scaling laws are pretty cool in general.
Elephants, on the other hand, are pretty much going to go splat.
__________________
Cum catapultae proscribeantur tum soli proscripti catapultas habeant.
Trebuchet is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 01:06 PM   #301
WhatRoughBeast
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,370
Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Elephants, on the other hand, are pretty much going to go splat.
Go to the Haldane essay linked earlier on the page.

"You can drop a mouse down a thousand-yard mine shaft; and, on arriving at the bottom, it gets a slight shock and walks away, provided that the ground is fairly soft. A rat is killed, a man is broken, a horse splashes."

Elephants aren't even mentioned.
WhatRoughBeast is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 02:36 PM   #302
Elagabalus
Illuminator
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,093
Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Perfection is a subjective, aesthetic judgement.

"Ellipses are imperfect" is neither "scientific" nor a "fact".

Indeed. I am oft troubled by the UKian expression "gone all pear shaped" used describe a situation that has gone awry, or "perhaps horribly wrong". What do they have against a pear's shape? To a pear, it is the perfect shape.

I also remember from one Astronomy class that if you were to draw a circle using a compass the amount of eccentricity in the Earth's orbit from a circle would be the width of the pencil line. Which gives a new appreciation of Kepler's achievement in figuring out that the true orbits of the planets are elliptical.

Another "fact" from the same class, if you take the average of the Earth's distance from the sun (93 million miles) and times it by two (186 million miles) and then divide that number by one thousand you get 186,000 miles which is the speed in which light travels in one second. Now, I can't remember exactly what necessitates the division by 1000 in the formulae* but I believe it has something to do with the predicted conjunction of Jupiter's moons being off (timing wise) when observed from the Earth at the winter and summer solstice.


*and for the purposes of this conversation, I am not going to look it up.
Elagabalus is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 02:43 PM   #303
MikeG
Now. Do it now.
 
MikeG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 24,804
Originally Posted by Elagabalus View Post
......I also remember from one Astronomy class that if you were to draw a circle using a compass the amount of eccentricity in the Earth's orbit from a circle would be the width of the pencil line.....
The thickness of the solid stuff on the surface of the planet is analogous to the thickness on the skin of an apple. The thickness of the atmosphere is analogous to the thickness of the yeast bloom on the apple skin.
__________________
"The Conservatives want to keep wogs out and march boldly back to the 1950s when Britain still had an Empire and blacks, women, poofs and Irish knew their place." The Don That's what we've sunk to here.
MikeG is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 02:54 PM   #304
Myriad
Hyperthetical
 
Myriad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: A pocket paradise between the sewage treatment plant and the railroad
Posts: 14,671
Originally Posted by WhatRoughBeast View Post
Go to the Haldane essay linked earlier on the page.

"You can drop a mouse down a thousand-yard mine shaft; and, on arriving at the bottom, it gets a slight shock and walks away, provided that the ground is fairly soft. A rat is killed, a man is broken, a horse splashes."

Elephants aren't even mentioned.

Elephants tend to jam in the shaft. Especially if they stretch their trunks out.
__________________
A zÝmbie once bit my sister...
Myriad is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:19 PM   #305
Steve
Illuminator
 
Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 4,831
Originally Posted by Myriad View Post
Elephants tend to jam in the shaft. Especially if they stretch their trunks out.
Makes that landing even softer for the mice.
__________________
Caption from and old New Yorker cartoon - Why am I shouting? Because I'm wrong!"
Steve is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:32 PM   #306
Thor 2
Illuminator
 
Thor 2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Brisbane, Aust.
Posts: 4,798
Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Perfection is a subjective, aesthetic judgement.

"Ellipses are imperfect" is neither "scientific" nor a "fact".
Wow! Neither scientific or factual hey. Must call on your expertise about this stuff more often.
__________________
Thinking is a faith hazard.
Thor 2 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:36 PM   #307
Thor 2
Illuminator
 
Thor 2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Brisbane, Aust.
Posts: 4,798
Originally Posted by ctamblyn View Post
Things I learned recently:

Adult dragonflies can fly backwards, up, down, sideways and even upside down.

Dragonfly nymphs (which are aquatic) breathe through gills in their rectums.
Originally Posted by MEequalsIxR View Post
Does that mean they talk out of their ...

That explains some of the posts on this forum. Get off the forum you ******* dragonfly nymphs.
__________________
Thinking is a faith hazard.
Thor 2 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 03:38 PM   #308
novaphile
Quester of Doglets
Moderator
 
novaphile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,625
Originally Posted by lionking View Post
They do the job on White Walkers as well......
... and winter is cummin'
__________________
We would be better, and braver, to engage in enquiry, rather than indulge in the idle fancy, that we already know -- Plato.
novaphile is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 04:02 PM   #309
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Elephants, on the other hand, are pretty much going to go splat.
Not to mention a whale falling from space.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 04:05 PM   #310
Elagabalus
Illuminator
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,093
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Makes that landing even softer for the mice.

Who then look up and give you the thousand yard stare?*



*Before scurrying off to do rodent type things, that is.
Elagabalus is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:01 PM   #311
sir drinks-a-lot
Illuminator
 
sir drinks-a-lot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cole Valley, CA
Posts: 3,664
Originally Posted by Belz... View Post
I don't know if it's been mentioned, but the fact that your 'mind' is made aware of your decisions quite a while after the unconscious processes have made those decisions.
Yes, this was shown by Benjamin Libet's experiment where the participants nerves were already sending signals to press the button before they had even 'decided' to push the button.

His book Mind Time, on the phenomenon and his interpretation is pretty good.
__________________
I drink to the general joy o' th' whole table. --William Shakespeare
sir drinks-a-lot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:01 PM   #312
This is The End
 
This is The End's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,711
Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Perfection is a subjective, aesthetic judgement.

"Ellipses are imperfect" is neither "scientific" nor a "fact".

You are incorrect.

"Perfect" is a scientific descriptor.

As in "a perfect straight line" or, more commonly, "a perfect circle". It simply means "no variation from exact".


You are correct in that whether or not it is "cool" or not is a subjective feeling.
__________________
________________________
This is The End is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:13 PM   #313
This is The End
 
This is The End's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,711
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post
Originally Posted by This is The End
Originally Posted by catsmate View Post
The ratio of the volumes of a cylinder, hemisphere and cone of equal base diameter and height is 3:2:1.

Do you mean sphere?
No he means hemisphere: pi*r^3:2/3*Pi*r^3

Sphere would be 4:3:1 (sphere:cylinder:cone)

ETA. Actually I think its both sphere and hemisphere, because for a hemisphere the height of the cone and cylinder will be r, but for a sphere it will be 2r

You've lost me... let's start over.


If anything is 3:2:1 then surely it is cylinder:sphere:cone ? I just double checked the math and that looks correct to me.

Either way, clearly a hemisphere would be less than half of the cylinder? So there is not way it would be the 2 in 3:2:1. I think catsmate is correct in the bit of trivia; he just typed hemisphere instead of sphere on accident.
__________________
________________________
This is The End is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:14 PM   #314
sir drinks-a-lot
Illuminator
 
sir drinks-a-lot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cole Valley, CA
Posts: 3,664
Said in an attempt to blow my mind by my friend's five year old daughter:

"The starfish is neither a star nor a fish."

Think about it.
__________________
I drink to the general joy o' th' whole table. --William Shakespeare
sir drinks-a-lot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:27 PM   #315
sir drinks-a-lot
Illuminator
 
sir drinks-a-lot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cole Valley, CA
Posts: 3,664
While not a scientific fact, Benford's Law is pretty interesting. Usually when I explain it to people, I just choose a few sets of data that I know will adhere to the law and state that they have a certain distribution of the leading digit. Then hope they protest so I can attempt to explain how it works.

One of the best examples I was able to come up with was the odometers of all cars in NYC. If you recorded all of these numbers and then just considered the leading digit (ignoring the zeros to the left). Most people intuitively think that there is a random distribution of numbers on the odometers and since there are nine digits to choose from (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) there would be an equal distribution with 11.11% of each digit.
__________________
I drink to the general joy o' th' whole table. --William Shakespeare
sir drinks-a-lot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 05:38 PM   #316
Elagabalus
Illuminator
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,093
Originally Posted by This is The End View Post
You are incorrect.

"Perfect" is a scientific descriptor.

As in "a perfect straight line" or, more commonly, "a perfect circle". It simply means "no variation from exact".


You are correct in that whether or not it is "cool" or not is a subjective feeling.
Which is why you can have a perfect ellipse.*


*Although, the planetary orbits all have a bit of wonkiness- so still not perfect.
Elagabalus is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:22 PM   #317
arthwollipot
Observer of Phenomena
 
arthwollipot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 61,132
We're pretty sure that space will keep expanding and stars will keep exploding until all the matter in the universe is sucked up by black holes. Then those holes will v-e-e-e-e-e-r-r-y slowly evaporate, until the entire universe is completely uniform in every way and no activity of any kind can occur. There is no matter and no energy.

I find this idea incredibly beautiful.
__________________
Self-described nerd. Pronouns: He/Him
arthwollipot is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:27 PM   #318
Roboramma
Penultimate Amazing
 
Roboramma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 12,065
Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
We're pretty sure that space will keep expanding and stars will keep exploding until all the matter in the universe is sucked up by black holes. Then those holes will v-e-e-e-e-e-r-r-y slowly evaporate, until the entire universe is completely uniform in every way and no activity of any kind can occur. There is no matter and no energy.

I find this idea incredibly beautiful.
Agree with everything in this post except for the highlighted portion.
__________________
"... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov
Roboramma is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:33 PM   #319
Distracted1
Master Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 2,829
Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
While not a scientific fact, Benford's Law is pretty interesting. Usually when I explain it to people, I just choose a few sets of data that I know will adhere to the law and state that they have a certain distribution of the leading digit. Then hope they protest so I can attempt to explain how it works.

One of the best examples I was able to come up with was the odometers of all cars in NYC. If you recorded all of these numbers and then just considered the leading digit (ignoring the zeros to the left). Most people intuitively think that there is a random distribution of numbers on the odometers and since there are nine digits to choose from (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) there would be an equal distribution with 11.11% of each digit.
I protest.
__________________
The man with one watch knows what time it is, the man with two watches is never sure.
Distracted1 is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th January 2019, 06:34 PM   #320
Thermal
Philosopher
 
Thermal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: NJ USA. We Don't Like You Either
Posts: 7,056
Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
Yes, this was shown by Benjamin Libet's experiment where the participants nerves were already sending signals to press the button before they had even 'decided' to push the button.

His book Mind Time, on the phenomenon and his interpretation is pretty good.
But Libet himself didn't agree that his results demonstrated determinism, IIRC?
__________________
"Half of what he said meant something else, and the other half didn't mean anything at all" -Rosencrantz, on Hamlet
Thermal is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:42 PM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum began as part of the James Randi Education Foundation (JREF). However, the forum now exists as
an independent entity with no affiliation with or endorsement by the JREF, including the section in reference to "JREF" topics.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.