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Old 16th January 2019, 04:33 PM   #481
MEequalsIxR
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Originally Posted by lobosrul5 View Post
But Pluto isn't a planet

This is one of the cooler things on the interwebs: http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/...larsystem.html

The Solar System scaled to the moon being 1 pixel.
It is quite cool thanks for the link!
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Old 16th January 2019, 06:55 PM   #482
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
This is called "digital arithmetic," in case you didn't know.
that's terrible!
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Old 16th January 2019, 07:56 PM   #483
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I dunno if nutrient profiling counts as scientific fact, but watercress is the most nutrient-dense vegetable.

My spinach only came in fifth place, which I had predicted to be in the top 3.
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Old 16th January 2019, 08:58 PM   #484
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Originally Posted by attempt5001 View Post
that's terrible!

Thank you. I was hoping someone would ... put their finger on it.
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Old 16th January 2019, 10:02 PM   #485
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Originally Posted by Venom View Post
I dunno if nutrient profiling counts as scientific fact, but watercress is the most nutrient-dense vegetable.

My spinach only came in fifth place, which I had predicted to be in the top 3.
That's better than my collards at 10th
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Old 16th January 2019, 10:38 PM   #486
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Furthermore, there are sign languages that encode specific spoken languages, and there are also dialects in sign languages within countries.

Many people think sign language is just having different signs for different words and signing them in order just like you would speak them
This could not be further from the truth.
Sign languages have evolved their own unique grammar that is much richer than spoken language because they can convey more information. How or where in relation to your body something is signed as well as mouthing are some aspects.

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language

According to the Wikipedia page the grammar of American Sign Language is the best studied of any sign language, although research is still in it's infancy. Just have a quick look through the Wiki page, it's more complex than you would have imagined and quite different from spoken language.


Believe it or not.
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Old 16th January 2019, 11:11 PM   #487
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Originally Posted by Venom View Post
As a longtime spider enthusiast, that is fascinating.
What I also find fascinating, and worthy of great respect, is the perseverance and dedication of the people who take the trouble to find out all this. There used to be a weekly series of programmes on BBC Radio 4 (almost certainly archived somewhere) where a reporter would spend time with an expert on a particular bird or insect, and however rare the subject, there was someone who knew just about everything there was to know about it.
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Old 17th January 2019, 06:54 AM   #488
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
The nearest planet to earth is Mercury.

I've just realised (cos I'm slow) - Does this means that Mercury is the nearest planet to all of the others?
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Old 17th January 2019, 08:17 AM   #489
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Good point, I hadn’t thought of that.
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Old 17th January 2019, 08:24 AM   #490
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Originally Posted by Venom View Post
Body mass of mammalian carnivores is limited to about a ton.
Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
Thatís interesting, but what stops them from evolving more robust bones?
That can happen, but we can see in herbivores that the robustness sacrifices speed, and they're apparently saying speed is more important for predators so predators wouldn't evolve to get too slow. (The abstract talks about skeletal stress from running; you can manage the stress by just not moving so fast and not even being designed to move fast, but then you abandon a speed-dependent lifestyle.)

Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
There will be diminishing returns but Iím not seeing a specific cutoff.
I haven't read the paper, but the interpretation in the abstract makes it sound like they plotted their data into a graph and saw a slope that gets really steep at one end in a way that wouldn't be anticipated and just had to be seen from actually plotting the data.
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Old 17th January 2019, 10:25 AM   #491
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Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
That can happen, but we can see in herbivores that the robustness sacrifices speed, and they're apparently saying speed is more important for predators so predators wouldn't evolve to get too slow. (The abstract talks about skeletal stress from running; you can manage the stress by just not moving so fast and not even being designed to move fast, but then you abandon a speed-dependent lifestyle.)

<snip>

This made me think about a small tortoise we kept in the kids' terrarium for a while.

Although quite content to thrive on lettuce and similar foodstuffs, tortoises are omnivorous and quite ferocious hunters. While it stayed in the terrarium we learned that nothing else which moved was going to survive long. Lizards, crawdads, etc., it didn't matter. Sooner or later the tortoise would catch it.

Snapping turtles are the bane of fish ponds, rapidly killing off all the small fish stock and ultimately eliminating the fish population. I've known farmers who would pay local kids to shoot the snappers in their fish ponds so that they could keep them stocked with fish.

So speed may not just be the ability to run fast. It also matters when and where the speed happens. The length of a tortoise neck is a kill zone.
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Old 17th January 2019, 05:32 PM   #492
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The compound eyes of trilobites were made up of calcite crystals.
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Old 17th January 2019, 06:22 PM   #493
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
The compound eyes of trilobites were made up of calcite crystals.
We have a trilobite, but the whole thing is made of stone!
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Old 17th January 2019, 06:38 PM   #494
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
We have a trilobite, but the whole thing is made of stone!
That's probably a statue carved by the trilobite civilization.
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Old 17th January 2019, 06:39 PM   #495
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Originally Posted by quadraginta View Post
So speed may not just be the ability to run fast. It also matters when and where the speed happens. The length of a tortoise neck is a kill zone.
That's sort of an ambush hunting strategy. And it can work well for reptiles in part because their low metabolism means they don't need that much food, so they can be patient when waiting for prey to come near. Mammals need more food because of their higher metabolism. In addition, there's a scaling problem: your strike zone scales with the square of your linear size, but your mass scales with the cube, making an ambush strategy harder for larger animals. I think these factors make such a strategy unworkable for really large mammals, they wouldn't be able to get enough to eat.
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Old 17th January 2019, 09:17 PM   #496
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Speaking of speed.
There is a new fastest movement. Yes, it is a vampire, we know how fast they are.
The Dracula ant snaps it's jaws like you would snap your fingers. The mandibles aren't sharp, but look like little clubs with which they stun their prey.


Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae.


"Kinematic analysis of high-speed video revealed that snap-jaw ant mandibles complete their strike in as little as 23 Ķsec and reach peak velocities of 90 m s−1, making them the fastest known animal appendage."
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Old 17th January 2019, 09:32 PM   #497
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Originally Posted by Cheetah View Post
Speaking of speed.
There is a new fastest movement. Yes, it is a vampire, we know how fast they are.
The Dracula ant snaps it's jaws like you would snap your fingers. The mandibles aren't sharp, but look like little clubs with which they stun their prey.


Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae.


"Kinematic analysis of high-speed video revealed that snap-jaw ant mandibles complete their strike in as little as 23 Ķsec and reach peak velocities of 90 m s−1, making them the fastest known animal appendage."
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Old 18th January 2019, 12:17 AM   #498
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Originally Posted by Cheetah View Post
Speaking of speed.
There is a new fastest movement. Yes, it is a vampire, we know how fast they are.
The Dracula ant snaps it's jaws like you would snap your fingers. The mandibles aren't sharp, but look like little clubs with which they stun their prey.


Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae.


"Kinematic analysis of high-speed video revealed that snap-jaw ant mandibles complete their strike in as little as 23 Ķsec and reach peak velocities of 90 m s−1, making them the fastest known animal appendage."
Put that up against the pistol shrimp's claw snap and it's more than three times as fast!

Wow.
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Old 18th January 2019, 05:03 AM   #499
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Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
That's probably a statue carved by the trilobite civilization.
According to Ancient Arthropod theorists, at any rate. There's a series on the History channel, full of convincing evidence.
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Old 18th January 2019, 07:29 AM   #500
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Originally Posted by Cosmic Yak View Post
According to Ancient Arthropod theorists, at any rate. There's a series on the History channel, full of convincing evidence.
"Trilobites. Primitive crablike animals with tiny brains, now long gone. They were unsophisticated creatures, mindlessly crawling around on the ancient sea as evolution passed them by.
Or were they?
Could the trilobites have actually been much more intelligent than scientists had ever thought possible? Could they have used tools, formed societies, perhaps even had a complex civilization? Rather than going extinct, could the trilobites have actually left the Earth on spaceships to escape an impending catastrophe?
Is it just a coincidence that we have the constellations Scorpio and Cancer, or do humans retain some instinctive memory of arthropods going to the sky?
This week, on Carapace of the Gods, we explore shocking new evidence that may change everything we ever thought about our distant trilobite cousins."
<cue dramatic music>
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Old 18th January 2019, 07:44 AM   #501
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Old 18th January 2019, 07:47 AM   #502
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Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
This week, on Carapace of the Gods
I would totally watch that show.
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Old 18th January 2019, 07:58 AM   #503
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Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
"Trilobites. Primitive crablike animals with tiny brains, now long gone. They were unsophisticated creatures, mindlessly crawling around on the ancient sea as evolution passed them by.
Or were they?
Could the trilobites have actually been much more intelligent than scientists had ever thought possible? Could they have used tools, formed societies, perhaps even had a complex civilization? Rather than going extinct, could the trilobites have actually left the Earth on spaceships to escape an impending catastrophe?
Is it just a coincidence that we have the constellations Scorpio and Cancer, or do humans retain some instinctive memory of arthropods going to the sky?
This week, on Carapace of the Gods, we explore shocking new evidence that may change everything we ever thought about our distant trilobite cousins."
<cue dramatic music>

You forgot the part about the trilobites' secret connection with the Knights Templar.
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:07 AM   #504
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Originally Posted by Myriad View Post
You forgot the part about the trilobites' secret connection with the Knights Templar.
"Throughout human history, the number 3 has had an outsized importance: The Holy Trinity, three branches of government, even three dimensions.
Why does humanity have such a fascination with the number three?
Could it be that our history has been shaped by a creature that was built around the number three? Perhaps even . . . three lobes?

For millions of years, the world was dominated by an ancient creature that was built on a three-lobed body plan. Science says that the trilobites were gone long before human civilization arose, but can we be sure?

Was the Knights' armor just a crude imitation of the trilobites' shell?
Why are horseshoes considered to bring good luck? Could it be because the horseshoe crab is the closest living relative of the trilobites?
Does the children's song 'Three Is A Magic Number' have a deeper significance than we ever thought possible?

Tonight, on Arthropods In Collision, we'll explore shocking new evidence that suggests that perhaps human civilization didn't rise on its own, but was helped along by ancient chitinous forebears."

<cue more dramatic music>

(The production company folded after making Arthropods In Collision so there won't be any more in the series, hopefully ending a derail)
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:19 AM   #505
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Originally Posted by 3point14 View Post
I've just realised (cos I'm slow) - Does this means that Mercury is the nearest planet to all of the others?
I rather doubt it since, actually right now Venus is the closest planet to Earth. Not sure where he got that information from. In fact Mars is also just a bit closer at the moment than Mercury. Mercury is sometimes closer however.

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/planets/distance (click "Distance from the Earth")
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:22 AM   #506
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Another interesting but little known fact. Trilobites have two distinct stages to their life cycle, the juvenile stage is carbon based and then slowly transitions to the super intelligent silicon based adult.


They are still alive...
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:24 AM   #507
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Originally Posted by lobosrul5 View Post
I rather doubt it since, actually right now Venus is the closest planet to Earth. Not sure where he got that information from. In fact Mars is also just a bit closer at the moment than Mercury. Mercury is sometimes closer however.

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/planets/distance (click "Distance from the Earth")
Mercury is more often closer to Earth than Venus in terms of distance.

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Old 18th January 2019, 09:38 AM   #508
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Originally Posted by RecoveringYuppy View Post
Mercury is more often closer to Earth than Venus in terms of distance.
But without qualification saying: Mercury is the closest planet to Earth is not precisely true. Since right now, its 3rd closest.

Anyways I finally found the info what I was looking for on wiki for Mercury:

Mercury is on average the closest planet to the Earth: it is closest to Earth 46% of the time; Venus is closest 36% of the time, while Mars is closest just 18% of the time.

So not even a majority of the time is it closest, but it holds a plurality.
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:44 AM   #509
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Originally Posted by lobosrul5 View Post
I rather doubt it since, actually right now Venus is the closest planet to Earth. Not sure where he got that information from. In fact Mars is also just a bit closer at the moment than Mercury. Mercury is sometimes closer however.

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/planets/distance (click "Distance from the Earth")

You need to go back and read the initial exchange. the discussion was about the nearest planet to earth on average.
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Old 18th January 2019, 09:56 AM   #510
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Lol nevermind.

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Old 18th January 2019, 10:08 AM   #511
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Originally Posted by Venom View Post
My spinach only came in fifth place, which I had predicted to be in the top 3.
You spend your free time predicting the relative nutrient densities of vegetables?
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Old 18th January 2019, 10:13 AM   #512
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A disturbingly large number of my favourite scientific facts come from XKCD. For example, that Tyrannosaurus Rex is more closely related to the sparrow than to the stegosaurus.

Dave
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Old 18th January 2019, 10:33 AM   #513
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
A disturbingly large number of my favourite scientific facts come from XKCD. For example, that Tyrannosaurus Rex is more closely related to the sparrow than to the stegosaurus.

Dave
That makes me wonder if humans aren't also more closely related to T. Rex. IIRC mammals were near the split that lead to the bird branch.

ETA: After a quick google: Probably not but not completely sure. Looks like mammals branched off before any dinosaurs had come along, but still it looks like a close branch to the mammals.

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Old 18th January 2019, 10:42 AM   #514
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Okay, time for something more fact-based from me.

I was sitting in a bar in Las Vegas and tried to imagine what the galaxy would look like if it was scaled to be about the size of Las Vegas. If you scale by 1 LY => 1 foot or 1 Parsec => 1 Meter (they're within 1%. Who knew?!), the resulting model would be about the size of a large city, 19 miles or 30 km across.

For those of us out in the 'burbs, the disk would be about 100 stories thick (300 meters, 1000 feet). In the spiral arms, you'd have (on average) 4 stars in a typical bedroom, and a typical star would be small enough that you could fit thousands of them in a typical bacteria, or hundreds of thousands in a red blood cell.

Our solar system, out to Neptune's orbit, would be about the size of a dust mite so if the solar system was a solid thing, it would barely be visible.

A very, very large star like Betelgeuse would 20 microns across, which is about the diameter of the very finest human hair. Betelgeuse would be 64 feet or about 20 meters from the far-too-small-to-see sun, so Betelgeuse isn't just in our galactic neighborhood, it's over there by the slot machines.

The sun would be orbiting around downtown Las Vegas at a blistering 0.2 millimeters per year.

If all the stars were packed into one place, they'd probably* fit in a ping-pong ball and would weigh much less.

The Andromeda galaxy would be just outside Denver.


*The few stars like Betelgeuse are so big that they dominate the volume calculation despite their rarity, and since I don't have a good size distribution for them, I'm not sure on the ping-pong-ball thing. I'm almost certain they'd fit in a tennis ball.
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Old 18th January 2019, 12:36 PM   #515
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Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
Okay, time for something more fact-based from me.

I was sitting in a bar in Las Vegas and tried to imagine what the galaxy would look like if it was scaled to be about the size of Las Vegas. If you scale by 1 LY => 1 foot or 1 Parsec => 1 Meter (they're within 1%. Who knew?!), the resulting model would be about the size of a large city, 19 miles or 30 km across.

For those of us out in the 'burbs, the disk would be about 100 stories thick (300 meters, 1000 feet). In the spiral arms, you'd have (on average) 4 stars in a typical bedroom, and a typical star would be small enough that you could fit thousands of them in a typical bacteria, or hundreds of thousands in a red blood cell.

Our solar system, out to Neptune's orbit, would be about the size of a dust mite so if the solar system was a solid thing, it would barely be visible.

A very, very large star like Betelgeuse would 20 microns across, which is about the diameter of the very finest human hair. Betelgeuse would be 64 feet or about 20 meters from the far-too-small-to-see sun, so Betelgeuse isn't just in our galactic neighborhood, it's over there by the slot machines.

The sun would be orbiting around downtown Las Vegas at a blistering 0.2 millimeters per year.

If all the stars were packed into one place, they'd probably* fit in a ping-pong ball and would weigh much less.

The Andromeda galaxy would be just outside Denver.


*The few stars like Betelgeuse are so big that they dominate the volume calculation despite their rarity, and since I don't have a good size distribution for them, I'm not sure on the ping-pong-ball thing. I'm almost certain they'd fit in a tennis ball.
Just FYI, I'm stealing this and emailing it to friends
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Old 18th January 2019, 06:09 PM   #516
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Originally Posted by sir drinks-a-lot View Post
You spend your free time predicting the relative nutrient densities of vegetables?


There are worse ways for someone to spend a little bit of their free time.
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Old 18th January 2019, 06:12 PM   #517
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
A disturbingly large number of my favourite scientific facts come from XKCD. For example, that Tyrannosaurus Rex is more closely related to the sparrow than to the stegosaurus.

Dave

No need to be disturbed. XKCD is a relatively information dense source, presented in a way that makes the information both entertaining and memorable.

Schools could learn a lot from the example it sets.
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Old 18th January 2019, 06:25 PM   #518
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Originally Posted by Hellbound View Post
Just FYI, I'm stealing this and emailing it to friends
Yeah, that's really cool.
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Old 18th January 2019, 08:05 PM   #519
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Originally Posted by Venom View Post
Put that up against the pistol shrimp's claw snap and it's more than three times as fast!

Wow.
Why the mantis shrimp is my new favorite animal.
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Old 18th January 2019, 10:59 PM   #520
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Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
Okay, time for something more fact-based from me.

Wow, thanks.


Have y'all seen the Scale of the Universe?


From our point of view things in the universe range form unimaginably huge to inconceivably minute.
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