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Old 14th May 2020, 06:18 AM   #81
Filippo Lippi
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Sorry, the pelargonium is called "Attar of roses" and I think the website where I bought it from gave the derivation of the name.
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Old 15th May 2020, 10:43 AM   #82
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Snath – the handle of a scythe.
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Old 15th May 2020, 10:47 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Snath – the handle of a scythe.
I didn't know that and I used to use a scythe for days on end.
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Old 15th May 2020, 10:57 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
I didn't know that and I used to use a scythe for days on end.
Odd way to refer to an eternity of reaping the souls of men, but cool flex nonetheless.
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:17 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by Dr. Keith View Post
Odd way to refer to an eternity of reaping the souls of men, but cool flex nonetheless.
Well, you know, killing time.
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Old 16th May 2020, 03:01 PM   #86
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Frittering: both killing time and also cooking -- and maybe both at once.
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Old 16th May 2020, 05:14 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
A fake word? A FAKE WORD? A FAKE WORD? Are you making fun of my terrible mental disability?

A pox on you sir and your so called skepticism. <SPIT>

Here. Have a pony:


Fake word?

A slight to protologists everywhere.
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Old 16th May 2020, 09:33 PM   #88
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I saw a new word in a column in Saturday's Toronto Star -- "huit". Thought, "That's interesting," but from a Google search it appears to be a typo for something.
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Old 17th May 2020, 12:38 AM   #89
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
I saw a new word in a column in Saturday's Toronto Star -- "huit". Thought, "That's interesting," but from a Google search it appears to be a typo for something.
Toronto? Could it simply have been the French for eight?
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Old 17th May 2020, 04:49 AM   #90
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(not liking bringing the politics into this thread, but...)
A CNN reporter recently coined the term "Trumpflation" -- regarding The PDJT's tendency to inflate statistics without reason. Even within the same sentence.
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Old 17th May 2020, 08:56 AM   #91
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
Hey, here's an idea, to pass the time away while sitting here. Let's have a little philosophical squabble. Can a word be fake once you've said it or printed it? You can call it a neologism, a bad word, or even a stupid one, but it now exists. See it there, on the page, rudely extending its defiant little finials at the gathering cloud of lexicogaphers buzzing at the screen.

Analyze and discuss.

I tried this excuse for years with my teachers, never worked.

Always got back the most useless piece of advice when asked how I was meant to know how to spell a word “look it up in a dictionary “
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Old 17th May 2020, 11:16 AM   #92
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
I tried this excuse for years with my teachers, never worked.

Always got back the most useless piece of advice when asked how I was meant to know how to spell a word “look it up in a dictionary “
I heard similar uselessness from teachers, including the obvious nonsense in response to some people saying they've got to do something, that "got" is not a word. Misuse aside, of course it is. Or the unclever cleverness of saying "ain't ain't in the dictionary" Which of course it is.
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Old 17th May 2020, 11:41 AM   #93
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quiddity
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Old 17th May 2020, 12:38 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by CelticRose View Post
Toronto? Could it simply have been the French for eight?
Not contextually.
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Old 17th May 2020, 03:18 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
I heard similar uselessness from teachers, including the obvious nonsense in response to some people saying they've got to do something, that "got" is not a word. Misuse aside, of course it is. Or the unclever cleverness of saying "ain't ain't in the dictionary" Which of course it is.
Maybe so, but "gullible" isn't.

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Old 17th May 2020, 09:45 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
I prefer the term "stunt word," because it conveys the impression of lack of authenticity without the suggestion that the word doesn't exist.
I like it!

Actually I have a feeling floccinaucinihilipilification is a stunt word too, but damn it's fun to say.
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Old 18th May 2020, 08:07 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
I like it!

Actually I have a feeling floccinaucinihilipilification is a stunt word too, but damn it's fun to say.
It certainly started out as a stunt word, but I think it's been around for so long that it's taken root in the language.
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Old 18th May 2020, 09:10 AM   #98
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A_language_is_a_dialect_with_an_army_and_navyWP
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Old 18th May 2020, 09:38 AM   #99
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From this quote by H.L.Mencken
Quote:
Five years of Prohibition have had, at least, this one benign effect: they have completely disposed of all the favorite arguments of the Prohibitionists. None of the great boons and usufructs that were to follow the passage of the Eighteenth Amendment has come to pass. There is not less drunkenness in the Republic, but more. There is not less crime, but more. There is not less insanity, but more. The cost of government is not smaller, but vastly greater. Respect for law has not increased, but diminished.
Looking at definitions of "usufruct" I am not sure if I see a "usufruct" in that quote. I shall sleep on it.
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Old 21st May 2020, 06:41 AM   #100
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A word that is poignantly relevant during this pandemic:


Relict - a widow or widower (non-gendered)
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Old 25th May 2020, 02:04 AM   #101
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Susie Dent again https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...115446785?s=21

Mumpsimus : someone who refuses to budge/insists they were right despite clear evidence they were wrong.
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Old 26th May 2020, 12:07 AM   #102
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Originally Posted by Wudang View Post
Susie Dent again https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...115446785?s=21

Mumpsimus : someone who refuses to budge/insists they were right despite clear evidence they were wrong.
Ooh, that could be useful.

Speaking of which, who here remembers "tergiversate"?
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Old 26th May 2020, 01:20 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Speaking of which, who here remembers "tergiversate"?
I remember it, but I'll have to look up what it means. Do I have to wait 48 hours, or don't trivia quiz rules apply here?

Dave
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Old 26th May 2020, 07:34 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by Gord_in_Toronto View Post
The real joy is finding an obscure word you did not previously know and then managing to work it into a conversation. I think it took me at least a decade to find an appropriate time use the word "chthonic".
Nice. Word leading off with five consonants!
Just the other day I read something about the Georgian language (the one spoken in Georgia, the country in the southern Caucasus): Aside from belonging to a small isolated group of languages (just a few languages spoken in and around Georgia, which are closely related to each other, but there exists no relationship to any other known language), it has the unique property of having words that start off fith five, six, or even eight consonants in a row!

Example (from Wikipadia):
გვრწვრთნი (gvrts'vrtni) = "you train us"

(Oh and yes, those things at the beginning of the above line: Georgian also has its own, exclusive script!)

Finally I found a language I truly don't ever want to learn, although it would be a cool body of nearly useless aptitude
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Old 26th May 2020, 08:24 AM   #105
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Originally Posted by Oystein View Post
Nice. Word leading off with five consonants!
Just the other day I read something about the Georgian language (the one spoken in Georgia, the country in the southern Caucasus): Aside from belonging to a small isolated group of languages (just a few languages spoken in and around Georgia, which are closely related to each other, but there exists no relationship to any other known language), it has the unique property of having words that start off fith five, six, or even eight consonants in a row!

Example (from Wikipadia):
გვრწვრთნი (gvrts'vrtni) = "you train us"

(Oh and yes, those things at the beginning of the above line: Georgian also has its own, exclusive script!)

Finally I found a language I truly don't ever want to learn, although it would be a cool body of nearly useless aptitude
But just think. If you did learn it, thanks to the miracle of the Internet, you might be able to find another speaker or two and then you could have Zoom meetings with them. What wonders there are in this age.
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Old 26th May 2020, 10:24 AM   #106
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Originally Posted by Oystein View Post
Nice. Word leading off with five consonants!
Just the other day I read something about the Georgian language (the one spoken in Georgia, the country in the southern Caucasus): Aside from belonging to a small isolated group of languages (just a few languages spoken in and around Georgia, which are closely related to each other, but there exists no relationship to any other known language), it has the unique property of having words that start off fith five, six, or even eight consonants in a row!

Example (from Wikipadia):
გვრწვრთნი (gvrts'vrtni) = "you train us"

(Oh and yes, those things at the beginning of the above line: Georgian also has its own, exclusive script!)

Finally I found a language I truly don't ever want to learn, although it would be a cool body of nearly useless aptitude
Many residents of the other Georgia are pretty much as incomprehensible.

Oh, and "chth" is only four. The next is "o".
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Old 26th May 2020, 06:51 PM   #107
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Many residents of the other Georgia are pretty much as incomprehensible.

Oh, and "chth" is only four. The next is "o".
I noticed that too but did not want to say anything negative (it's the Canadian way).
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Old 26th May 2020, 07:46 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
I remember it, but I'll have to look up what it means. Do I have to wait 48 hours, or don't trivia quiz rules apply here?
It was a favourite of a certain Yrreg.
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Old 26th May 2020, 09:44 PM   #109
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My recollection is that it means to reverse oneself, often in a manner not very convincing. A flip-flop dressed up.
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Old 28th May 2020, 05:51 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post

Speaking of which, who here remembers "tergiversate"?
Yrreg?
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Old 28th May 2020, 12:24 PM   #111
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Many residents of the other Georgia are pretty much as incomprehensible.
You need not tell me. I lived in US Georgia for 2 1/2 years! Upon arrival, I found that my spoken English was surprisingly fluent, but I had trouble understanding the locals. So the first week or so, my strategy was to keep talking and talking, with a view to avoiding having to listen

Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Oh, and "chth" is only four. The next is "o".
Nitpickers would point out that "ch" and "th" are actually just two consonants in spoken language; written English employs two letters because there exists no single letter to express these phonemes.
Similarly, I once read that the German word with the most consonants in a row is "Borschtschgschnas" - seemingly 17 in a row. But "sch" is the same as "sh" in Englisch, and only 1 consonantic phonem, so that reduces the number to just 7 . ("Borschtsch" by the way is a Russian beet soup, and "Gschnas" is an Austrian word that originally was used to describe worthless left-overs, and in today's Vieanna stands for a merry costume party. Combining the two ... urr well, make of it what you want)
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Old 28th May 2020, 02:58 PM   #112
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And then, of course, there's Wales!
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Old 29th May 2020, 01:36 AM   #113
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Originally Posted by Oystein View Post
Similarly, I once read that the German word with the most consonants in a row is "Borschtschgschnas" - seemingly 17 in a row. But "sch" is the same as "sh" in Englisch, and only 1 consonantic phonem, so that reduces the number to just 7 .
In a similar vein, the only example of a triple letter I know of is in the surname of the German pro cyclist Felix Grossschartner, but again that only arises from English needing a double s for a German letter we don't have.

Dave
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Old 29th May 2020, 08:54 AM   #114
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
In a similar vein, the only example of a triple letter I know of is in the surname of the German pro cyclist Felix Grossschartner, but again that only arises from English needing a double s for a German letter we don't have.

Dave
The German "eszet" is an odd case. Though it has become a letter in its own right, it began as just a ligature standing for a double "S." Once upon a time, in English and Latin and other languages, the same rule was applied, with an initial "S" being long, and the following one short. Most languages dropped this, in part apparently because the practice made both casting and setting movable type cumbersome. In modern typography, we no longer see what were once a large collection of "glyphs" (typographical ligatures), for "ss," "ae," "fl" and "th" and the like. None of those were considered to be single letters, but only a typographical equivalent of handwriting conventions.


Nowadays a lot of people misread the long "s" as an "f" when they see it. Interestingly, when I read up about this, it seems that German typography has gone rather in reverse relative to others. Up until recently the "eszet" had not been used in upper case, but rather than dropping it from lower case as others did, the Germans added it. So had that name been printed in capital letters, until recently it would have required three esses in a row.
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Old 30th May 2020, 12:27 AM   #115
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Originally Posted by Oystein View Post
Nice. Word leading off with five consonants!
Just the other day I read something about the Georgian language (the one spoken in Georgia, the country in the southern Caucasus): Aside from belonging to a small isolated group of languages (just a few languages spoken in and around Georgia, which are closely related to each other, but there exists no relationship to any other known language), it has the unique property of having words that start off fith five, six, or even eight consonants in a row!

Example (from Wikipadia):
გვრწვრთნი (gvrts'vrtni) = "you train us"

(Oh and yes, those things at the beginning of the above line: Georgian also has its own, exclusive script!)

Finally I found a language I truly don't ever want to learn, although it would be a cool body of nearly useless aptitude
This puts me in mind of an "aside" by Rebecca West, in her (fascinating) work Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, about her travels in the late 1930s in what was then Yugoslavia. Prompted by a place-name in Bosnia, which was under Turkish rule for a number of centuries, and where various Turkish-language traces linger. The name involves a bit of Turkish plural-forming weirdness, which leads the author -- not a naturally talented linguist -- to remark: "I have never heard anything that made me more positively anxious not to study Turkish...". It's a good thing that, so far as I know, the lady never visited Georgia.
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Old 5th June 2020, 01:47 AM   #116
Wudang
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Susie Dent yet again
Quote:
Forwallowed: exhausted from tossing and turning.
Forswunk: exhausted by work.
Forwaked: exhausted by waking and watching.
Forweeped: exhausted by crying.
Forfeebled: just exhausted.
via https://twitter.com/susie_dent/statu...318125056?s=20
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