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Old 22nd November 2019, 01:48 PM   #1
pipelineaudio
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Cleaning scrapes and cuts

MRSA and flesh eating bacteria have become rampant in Hawaii and I have several friends in and just out of the hospital requiring major skin grafts after very minor, almost unnoticeable scrapes and cuts.

All of the litterature the doctors give talk about washing out wounds to prevent infection, but unless you are at home, washing facilities or restrooms are extremely rare or non existent here.

Are there some sorts of sprays or something that could be applied to cuts instead?
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Old 22nd November 2019, 02:21 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by pipelineaudio View Post
MRSA and flesh eating bacteria have become rampant in Hawaii and I have several friends in and just out of the hospital requiring major skin grafts after very minor, almost unnoticeable scrapes and cuts.

All of the litterature the doctors give talk about washing out wounds to prevent infection, but unless you are at home, washing facilities or restrooms are extremely rare or non existent here.

Are there some sorts of sprays or something that could be applied to cuts instead?
Well, part of what I do involves installing cabinets and servers to populate them. Given the plethora of sharp metal edges in that task, minor cuts are de riguer. Not to mention a variety of pointy/sharp hand tools. Mostly, hands but the occasional unwary head. Those used to be blown off as trivial, but with the rise of MRSA and it's ilk, people (including me) are having second thoughts about that.

Now, I have that kind of exposure at least once a week. And I can guarantee I will pick up some random nick scrape or cut every time. Should there be a field dressing kit as standard as a screwdriver? Probably. Is there one? I don't know. I don't even know what should rightly go in one. Or if it is even possible to create one that handily fits in one's toolbox.

The facility to wash out a wound is problematic. This requires a clean water source. The site may not have facilities, or as happened recently to me, the site is subject to a boil water notice. Then what?

Currently, I am sporting two wounds. A minor abrasion to the back of my right hand. Left a mark which is fading to nothing. And a deep cut to left index finger which may leave a scar. It can join the other scars if it does.

Nevertheless, a colleague picked up Weil or Lyme disease (sorry, I always confuse the two) in exactly that way.

So your short answer is that yes, it is concerning and no, I don't have a solution. It's impractical to tote around a portable sterile wash station and local water supplies are not necessarily reliable.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 02:53 PM   #3
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Iodine? Betadine? Chlorhexidine? Mercurochrome? Merthiolate? Rubbing alcohol? Whiskey?

Kaiser has gone away from the anti-bacterials for wound dressing, they say petroleum jelly and a band ade.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 03:07 PM   #4
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Thats what I was seeing too, despite these germs here, they are saying no iodine, no alcohol, and I cant figure out what would get a yes besides the standard "rinse out the wound" which is impossible here
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Old 22nd November 2019, 03:10 PM   #5
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I get injured constantly, The only time i treat a wound is to keep blood from staining the object i am working on, black 'electrical tape' works good. that is all
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Old 22nd November 2019, 03:21 PM   #6
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Carrying a sealed bottle of plain saline will help a lot, that's what they use to clean & irrigate wounds in the ERs here, and it's not expensive. It's better than trying to keep track of antibacterial products that expire, because it's got a longer shelf life and is very inexpensive to replace once you break the seal.

I suspect that waterproof bandages may make things worse by giving the bacteria a nice protected environment, but I have no actual proof either way, nor have I had time to look.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 03:38 PM   #7
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I think Bactine was made for that purpose.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 04:08 PM   #8
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Regular soap and water is good for most things, and gets rid of enough your body can handle the rest. I'd second the bottle of saline suggestion, and maybe a small bar (or bottle, if liquid) of anti-bacterial soap.

There are various antibiotic wound ointments, like Bactine and Neosporin, but they're usually not needed.

And yeah, I'd stay away from waterproof bandages unless you need them, and if you do use them (like, working in a wet environment or something) and change them at least daily (letting the wound "air out" for a bit during changes). Mostly you want a clean, dry, breathable bandage.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 09:49 PM   #9
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Last I checked they were saying for most bump and scrape type injuries, not even soap, just rinse it off with saline, slap on some antibiotic goop and a sticky bandage (unless that would get immediately mucky). Which surprised me as Iíd always thought soap and water every time but apparently they donít want you interfering with your immune response there. More aggressive washing is for obvious Horrible Matter involvements. I donít know what they recommend for mrsa high environments.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 10:27 PM   #10
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Who's they? Come on people, you're better than that.

Deadrose's post is accurate.

REI: How to Treat Cuts, Scrapes and Gouges in the Backcountry

Wilderness Environmental medicine: Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for Basic Wound Management in the Austere Environment

You said no immediate access to running water. Running water is best, a sink or in the shower. But sometimes those facilities are not immediately handy.

How long until you get back to access running water? The only reason to squirt betadine on the wound is if it's going to be a long time. Clean it with a squirt bottle of water or saline. (Keep something in your car.) If you can, cover it with gauze and tape.

Tidbits:
Wet bandaids act like a wick.

Find out what organisms are circulating in your area. MRSA has spread around the world but infections aren't that common.

US Pharmacist: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infections
Quote:
These agents are used to address surface colonization as well as active infection.20 Agents used include mupirocin, chlorhexidine, and triple antibiotic ointment containing neomycin, polymyxin B, and bacitracin.
MRSA and rapidly invasive streptococcal infections are two different things. If you have something that is rapidly invasive (it's still friggin rare) you are going to be headed to the ED that day. It spreads that fast.

But MRSA is still readily treatable with a limited number of antibiotics, but the number isn't zero.
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Old 23rd November 2019, 03:44 AM   #11
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What keeps happening to people here are severe infections, mostly of the legs. Health officials have managed to convince most people to stay out of traditional fishing and gathering grounds, but not until everyone had someone close with an amputated leg.

What's gotten so much worse now is just common activities in downtown areas are leading to these flesh eating things and you really dont know its a bad one until way too late and its necrosis time.

Is there a good, cheap way to make a saline solution?
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Old 23rd November 2019, 04:40 AM   #12
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A saline solution is just salt water. Clean water and salt, mix until the salt dissolves.

https://www.healthline.com/health/ma...aline-solution

You can buy sealed, preprepared plastic vials used for cleaning wounds. I keep a small bottle of hand cleaner gel on me at all times and I'll use that on minor abrasions as my work involves a high risk of contact with dirt and animal faeces. Another option (I'm not a doctor so treat as annecdotal) is to keep a 100ml bottle with a couple of cc.s of iodine in it, add clean water and you have an antiseptic wash immediately, if the water isn't known to be safe leave it for a few minutes to allow the iodine to sterilize the water then use it.
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Old 23rd November 2019, 05:49 AM   #13
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I must have twenty tubes and sprays of saniitiser, isoprop or ethanol, in my swag drawer. They're useful for this sort of thing, as are the ubiquitous individual wipes.
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Old 23rd November 2019, 11:53 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by P.J. Denyer View Post
A saline solution is just salt water. Clean water and salt, mix until the salt dissolves.

https://www.healthline.com/health/ma...aline-solution

You can buy sealed, preprepared plastic vials used for cleaning wounds. I keep a small bottle of hand cleaner gel on me at all times and I'll use that on minor abrasions as my work involves a high risk of contact with dirt and animal faeces. Another option (I'm not a doctor so treat as annecdotal) is to keep a 100ml bottle with a couple of cc.s of iodine in it, add clean water and you have an antiseptic wash immediately, if the water isn't known to be safe leave it for a few minutes to allow the iodine to sterilize the water then use it.
Check in the contact lense care section, you can either get a a largeish (250ml is common over here) bottle or single use 'vials' of 20-30ml each. You can probably also ask at the pharmacy counter wound dressing packs, an all-in-one kit for cleaning & dressing a wound pretty cheap. Making a saline solution is pretty easy, storing it sterile is harder.

I also keep a bottle of branded 'First Aid' Wash, a low concentration cetrimide in a pump spray to flush out wounds, gels can trap stuff in the wound.
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Old 25th November 2019, 08:07 PM   #15
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I swear by Neosporin and Polysporin but I only use them once every few years. Neosporin is always in my hiking bag and when I lived in Hawaii on my dive boat.
Don't forget to clean your ears if you are in the water a lot. I used to make my own version of Swimear with alcohol and a little moisturizer (glycerin??) and flushed with fresh water. I used to regularly do six hour dives with a rebreather and my inner ears needed more preventative care than anything else.

I just spent the winter in the Philippines and I was advised that any cut below the waist can be deadly if not monitored.

Don't settle for anything less than expert advice though and not from someone who's okole puka no stay pilau.
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Old 25th November 2019, 11:17 PM   #16
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Lick it?


Originally Posted by Ron Swanson View Post
I get injured constantly, The only time i treat a wound is to keep blood from staining the object i am working on, black 'electrical tape' works good. that is all

That's what I do, except no tape. So basically nothing.

I cut the top of my index finger deep a few years ago. Took half of a clothes pin and made a kinda splint and wrapped it with a bit of napkin and a thin bit of duct tape. Saved me a 6 hour ER visit and it healed nicely. Better than the stitched thumb 35 years ago that I can still see. Doctors shmoctors!

My wife used to get upset a bit when she'd ask how I got a cut and I answered that I didn't know. It's what guys do, babe!

I'm curious - why was it worse to have a cut below the waist?
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Old 26th November 2019, 01:01 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by mgidm86 View Post
Lick it?
(...)
I'm curious - why was it worse to have a cut below the waist?

You need somebody else to lick it?!
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Old 26th November 2019, 01:09 AM   #18
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I work in pest control specialising in bird control and surveying/specifying for control measures. I'm often up to my ankles in bird **** clambering around roofs with sharp edges, pointy bits etc. I'm constantly aware of cuts and wear gloves... try it.

I apply anti bacterial by the bucket load, daily, and always seek out the clients washrooms as soon as I'm done. I'm more often than not cut around the shins as I clamber over stuff on the roof.
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Old 26th November 2019, 05:05 AM   #19
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You need to clean dirt out of the wound. Saline is irrelevant, you need a clean fluid. Bottled water is fine, tap water OK. In the backwoods you are likely to have water with you for drinking, use that. Encourage bleeding initially (assuming you have not cut a major blood vessel) it will wash out stuff. I carry a little tube of hand sanitiser, a basic alcohol based antiseptic this can be rubbed in (painful) after the wound is washed. Then a dry dressing. Occlusive dressings encourage humidity and this favours bacterial growth.

I once worked with a retired army specialist in tropical diseases. His travel advice was beer. Apparently to brew beer you need good sanitation and beer is always sterile and usually cheaper than water, and usually easy to buy. (He also said there is a high risk that bottled water in the third world is refilled and non-sterile always choose fizzy water as this is much harder to fake.) He washed his teeth with beer, washed his salad in beer, washed his cuts in beer. He didn't much like beer to drink.

There are a variety of reasons for unhealing wounds, leishmaniasis, tropical ulcers etc. if in an at risk zone. These need specialist advice and possibly biopsy.

MRSA is essentially self inflicted. Staph is carried on your skin, it is not an environmental organism, it get into the wound from the skin. Prior hospitalisation or use of antibiotics makes it more likely that you will carry MRSA. Usually it will be killed by antiseptics (primarily it is antibiotic resistant). Some of the killer flesh eating bugs may be oral so saliva should be avoided.
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Old 26th November 2019, 05:12 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by mgidm86 View Post
Lick it?





That's what I do, except no tape. So basically nothing.

I cut the top of my index finger deep a few years ago. Took half of a clothes pin and made a kinda splint and wrapped it with a bit of napkin and a thin bit of duct tape. Saved me a 6 hour ER visit and it healed nicely. Better than the stitched thumb 35 years ago that I can still see. Doctors shmoctors!

My wife used to get upset a bit when she'd ask how I got a cut and I answered that I didn't know. It's what guys do, babe!

I'm curious - why was it worse to have a cut below the waist?
This has to do with poor venous and lymph drainage. Stuff having to go uphill against gravity. So wounds tend to get more swelling. Some parts of the legs actually have very poor blood circulation to skin, especially the shins. In elderly people or diabetics or obese people it may be very difficult for shin injuries to heal.
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Old 26th November 2019, 05:17 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by pipelineaudio View Post
What keeps happening to people here are severe infections, mostly of the legs. Health officials have managed to convince most people to stay out of traditional fishing and gathering grounds, but not until everyone had someone close with an amputated leg.

What's gotten so much worse now is just common activities in downtown areas are leading to these flesh eating things and you really dont know its a bad one until way too late and its necrosis time.

Is there a good, cheap way to make a saline solution?
Are you in Australia? There has been an unexplained epidemic of tropical ulcer.
https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1706
The problem with this bug is it is the 1% in the adverts which say 'kills 99% of all known germs'. Bleach does not easily kill it. Most other antiseptics won't.
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Old 26th November 2019, 05:28 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by abaddon View Post
Well, part of what I do involves installing cabinets and servers to populate them. Given the plethora of sharp metal edges in that task, minor cuts are de riguer. Not to mention a variety of pointy/sharp hand tools. Mostly, hands but the occasional unwary head. Those used to be blown off as trivial, but with the rise of MRSA and it's ilk, people (including me) are having second thoughts about that.

Now, I have that kind of exposure at least once a week. And I can guarantee I will pick up some random nick scrape or cut every time. Should there be a field dressing kit as standard as a screwdriver? Probably. Is there one? I don't know. I don't even know what should rightly go in one. Or if it is even possible to create one that handily fits in one's toolbox.

The facility to wash out a wound is problematic. This requires a clean water source. The site may not have facilities, or as happened recently to me, the site is subject to a boil water notice. Then what?

Currently, I am sporting two wounds. A minor abrasion to the back of my right hand. Left a mark which is fading to nothing. And a deep cut to left index finger which may leave a scar. It can join the other scars if it does.

Nevertheless, a colleague picked up Weil or Lyme disease (sorry, I always confuse the two) in exactly that way.

So your short answer is that yes, it is concerning and no, I don't have a solution. It's impractical to tote around a portable sterile wash station and local water supplies are not necessarily reliable.

Certainly not Lyme which is tick borne, you have to get bitten by an infected tick. Weil's is carried in rodent urine, so you need a cut contaminated by rodent urine. Classically in sewers, but can occur in jungle streams. It would be unusual for either to occur when installing servers, the sort of bugs and viruses servers are contaminated with do not infect humans. Clean dry metal is unlikely to have many pathogenic germs, the biggest risk is the germs on your skin, or secondary contamination. FWIW the germs that contaminate drinking water requiring boil water notices cause GI infections and aren't likely to cause wound infections. If the wound is dirty and needs washing (and assuming there is no kettle to get previously boiled tepid water), then the tap water is probably better than nothing.
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Old 26th November 2019, 06:04 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by pipelineaudio View Post
MRSA and flesh eating bacteria have become rampant in Hawaii and I have several friends in and just out of the hospital requiring major skin grafts after very minor, almost unnoticeable scrapes and cuts.

Maybe not:

Quote:
Dr. Sarah Park, state epidemiologist at the Department of Health, said doctors havenít seen any increase in flesh-eating disease in patients.
The diagnosis is considered uncommon but not rare.
She also said that higher or lower bacteria counts in the water doesnít necessarily correlate with disease rates. Bacteria is everywhere in the environment, she said, and severe infections can happen from the simplest of cuts.
GRAPHIC: For these oceangoers, simple cuts at the beach turned into raging infections (Hawaii News, Oct. 3, 2019)
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Old 26th November 2019, 06:25 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Weil's is carried in rodent urine...
Just to be pedantic, Weil's is the disease caused by the bacterium Leptospira that can be carried in rodent urine.
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Old 26th November 2019, 06:49 AM   #25
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So if you're stung by a jellyfish, you shouldn't have a rodent pee on you?!
I suppose it's still OK to let Nicole Kidman do it ...
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"Stupidity renders itself invisible by assuming very large proportions. Completely unreasonable claims are irrefutable. Ni-en-leh pointed out that a philosopher might get into trouble by claiming that two times two makes five, but he does not risk much by claiming that two times two makes shoe polish." B. Brecht
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Old 26th November 2019, 07:50 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Mongrel View Post
Check in the contact lense care section, you can either get a a largeish (250ml is common over here) bottle or single use 'vials' of 20-30ml each. You can probably also ask at the pharmacy counter wound dressing packs, an all-in-one kit for cleaning & dressing a wound pretty cheap. Making a saline solution is pretty easy, storing it sterile is harder.

I also keep a bottle of branded 'First Aid' Wash, a low concentration cetrimide in a pump spray to flush out wounds, gels can trap stuff in the wound.

In most places, you can find pressurized cans of contact lens saline. When I had contact lenses, I was advised to use these over the squeeze bottles. The bottles suck air back in, so there was a small but non-zero risk of contamination. For would cleaning, the moderately-pressurized stream would be ideal for flushing out most wounds.
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Old 26th November 2019, 08:41 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Warmer1 View Post
I swear by Neosporin and Polysporin but I only use them once every few years. Neosporin is always in my hiking bag and when I lived in Hawaii on my dive boat.
As I think was mentioned above, the medical community has very much moved away from those products for wound care. Just vaseline. Of course, I'm talking about small surgical wounds; they may still be effective for injuries.
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Old 26th November 2019, 10:12 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Are you in Australia? There has been an unexplained epidemic of tropical ulcer.
https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1706
The problem with this bug is it is the 1% in the adverts which say 'kills 99% of all known germs'. Bleach does not easily kill it. Most other antiseptics won't.
Hawaii, but I wouldnt be surprised if its the same one. Hawaii and australia and all the islands in between share the same travelling anti vaccine, anti science, anti gmo anti telescope activists that are travelling back and forth constantly. They just managed to doom Samoa to measles, and then be proud of how they "stood up to western medicine"....who knows
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Old 26th November 2019, 10:16 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by dann View Post
Maybe not:
Uncommon but not rare.

Yes, most tourists and military don't get it, safe in their compounds. The populace outside that however, happens way way way too much for anyone's comfort

I'm reminded of "there's been no shark attacks in hawaii since Billy Weaver in 1959"
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Old 26th November 2019, 02:39 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Certainly not Lyme which is tick borne, you have to get bitten by an infected tick. Weil's is carried in rodent urine, so you need a cut contaminated by rodent urine.

Classically in sewers, but can occur in jungle streams. It would be unusual for either to occur when installing servers, the sort of bugs and viruses servers are contaminated with do not infect humans.
TY. That's probably the one. And the rodent urine is the likely vector. I have many times lifted a floor or ceiling tile to be confronted with the aftermath of rodents it you catch my drift. Some of the locations where I have had to install gear are less than ideal.

Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Clean dry metal is unlikely to have many pathogenic germs, the biggest risk is the germs on your skin, or secondary contamination.
That remains true for as long as that very metal remains clean. In some of the locations I have had to work, that is about 3 nanoseconds. I have on occasion gone home in the evening only to resume next morning to a surprising amount of
"evidence" of nocturnal activity.

Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
FWIW the germs that contaminate drinking water requiring boil water notices cause GI infections and aren't likely to cause wound infections.
Cryptosporidium and E coli were the culprits. Being partially immuno-compromised, I err on the side of caution by default.

Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
If the wound is dirty and needs washing (and assuming there is no kettle to get previously boiled tepid water), then the tap water is probably better than nothing.
No argument there. Better out than in.
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Old 26th November 2019, 08:45 PM   #31
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Is Weils like leptosporosis?
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Old 27th November 2019, 04:38 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by pipelineaudio View Post
Uncommon but not rare.
Yes, most tourists and military don't get it, safe in their compounds. The populace outside that however, happens way way way too much for anyone's comfort
I'm reminded of "there's been no shark attacks in hawaii since Billy Weaver in 1959"

Uncommon and not increasing is not exactly rampant.
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Old 28th November 2019, 07:21 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
As I think was mentioned above, the medical community has very much moved away from those products for wound care. Just vaseline. Of course, I'm talking about small surgical wounds; they may still be effective for injuries.
The standard treatment has been soap and water for a long time. The overuse of antibiotic soaps, ointments, and similar is thought to have led to the various resistant strains out there, and plain old soap and water will remove enough of just about everything that your body can deal with the rest.

The only time I'd use them is if it's a known contaminated wound, or a very high likelihood; otherwise just soap and water. The mayo clinic recommends the same thing (soap and water), and they're generally a trustworthy source for this sort of thing.

ETA: Puncture wounds are bit iffier, because punctures tend to get stuff in them that isn't easily washed out. Even then, the saline flush others have recommended is likely sufficient (the ointments and such won't go inside a puncture anyway).
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Old 28th November 2019, 09:19 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Planigale View Post
Certainly not Lyme which is tick borne, you have to get bitten by an infected tick. Weil's is carried in rodent urine, so you need a cut contaminated by rodent urine. Classically in sewers, but can occur in jungle streams. It would be unusual for either to occur when installing servers,
Up to that point, fine ^. But after that is full of bad medicine.

Quote:
the sort of bugs and viruses servers are contaminated with do not infect humans. Clean dry metal is unlikely to have many pathogenic germs, the biggest risk is the germs on your skin, or secondary contamination. FWIW the germs that contaminate drinking water requiring boil water notices cause GI infections and aren't likely to cause wound infections. If the wound is dirty and needs washing (and assuming there is no kettle to get previously boiled tepid water), then the tap water is probably better than nothing.
Where did you get this stuff from? Hospitals are full of nasty pathogens lurking on shiny metal bed rails and many many other metal surfaces.
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Old 28th November 2019, 09:25 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Ros View Post
Just to be pedantic, Weil's is the disease caused by the bacterium Leptospira that can be carried in rodent urine.
Leptospira can be found in puddles.

https://www.cdc.gov/leptospirosis/infection/index.html
Quote:
The bacteria that cause leptospirosis are spread through the urine of infected animals, which can get into water or soil and can survive there for weeks to months. Many different kinds of wild and domestic animals carry the bacterium.
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Old 28th November 2019, 09:28 PM   #36
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MRSA is seriously misunderstood.
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Old 29th November 2019, 07:44 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by dann View Post
Uncommon and not increasing is not exactly rampant.
I guess it’s ok then. I’ll tell that to everyone with gigantic chunks of missing flesh, limbs, or “only” had to spend weeks in the hospital. I should be done telling them by the time I’m 90. But it’s not rampant so it’s ok. As for not increasing? The ineptness and criminality of the states public facing and medical boards legendary status has probably reached the point of running jokes that I bet Ginger could tell you about, in spite of the incredible work the actual doctors and nurses in the trenches do here. I’m sure it’s not increasing the same way we haven’t had shark attacks since 1959. The badass blonde haired surfer girl bit her own arm off or something
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Old 29th November 2019, 09:05 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Up to that point, fine ^. But after that is full of bad medicine.



Where did you get this stuff from? Hospitals are full of nasty pathogens lurking on shiny metal bed rails and many many other metal surfaces.
And the reason for that is hospitals are full of people with nasty infections who are bleeding or coughing or have other orifices producing infective fluids that contaminate metal and other surfaces on a continual basis. It is not the metal that holds the infection but the organic material deposited on it. This is not really an issue in server farms (although apparently they do have problems with rodents which I had not previously realised). The transmission is mostly through person to person touch, although other sources such as aerosols from contaminated water do occur. E. coli can survive upto 24 hours on a work surface, https://www.safefood.eu/Food-safety/...amination.aspx an issue in a hospital or kitchen but it is unlikely a piece of raw chicken or faeces would be contaminating server shelving on a daily basis.

Bacteria survive very poorly on dry surfaces. Metal does not have any nutritional value for bacteria. A dry metal surface is probably one of the lowest yields if swabbing surfaces.
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Old 29th November 2019, 09:19 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Up to that point, fine ^. But after that is full of bad medicine.



Where did you get this stuff from? Hospitals are full of nasty pathogens lurking on shiny metal bed rails and many many other metal surfaces.
If you want to disagree on facts point them out. This is a skeptic site, we can review the evidence. But I am not going to accept a generalised 'this is wrong'; I think I am right.

I have responded with one factual source to your concern over metal being a high risk of infection when causing a cut. The major risk is not a cut from metal but contaminating material deposited in the wound either from the metal if it was dirty, or self contaminating e.g. MRSA is a skin bug and most likely would come from your own skin. Or secondary contamination, which is why you cover wounds.

Others have posted advice about washing with soap and (tap) water. This is reasonable, but if you don't have the soap washing out a wound with clean (tap) water is better than nothing.
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Old 29th November 2019, 10:20 AM   #40
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In a serious pinch, you can use urine. It's not completely sterile, but it's hostile to most bacteria.

As a very untrained layman, I'd suggest using your own pee. I surmise that your ine will be more congenial than my ine or anybody else's. Of course, once out of the pinch, wash with clean water and soap.
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