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Old 6th March 2016, 04:30 AM   #241
calebprime
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Stub: Trusting/not trusting Alice Flaherty


-pros: many

-cons: neuroleptics as a first line (ok not exactly)., Biederman, sicker than me, wants to be a rock star*, blink response, slightly too enamoured with her own intelligence

--motivation problems that may color other stuff: writing the second book, frustrations of. envy of hypomania, hypomanics

and, because she's a doctor, musicians have a sort of forbidden glamour that they may not even want to have. Blecchh.

"take a walk on the wild side." Heh. Darling, stick to what you know. And, please, don't think I share your pleasure in the media limelight.

oh, yes: that I don't want to go to frickin' Harvard Club means I'm Hikikomori.


* see also: _Weekends at Bellevue_ Julie Holland, M.D. Another rock star. about that: gag me with a stethoscope

Last edited by calebprime; 6th March 2016 at 06:20 AM.
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Old 6th March 2016, 06:09 AM   #242
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Encounters with the local constabulary, part 25 -- That change of tone

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...95be24bb8fc8d7

4:35 -ish am

At the highschool, in that little recessed area off Tappan St., there was a Brookline police car.

First it looked like no one there, but it was making a lot of noise.

I wanted to say hello, so I can build a solid, mature, trusting relationship.

What to do?

Suddenly I get worried. Maybe there's no one in the car, which means...
what if he got called for a prowler, and is walking around, all adrenalized?

I decide to give him at least 3 car-lengths, and sort of bleat loudly but also look submissive.

Finally, after a minute of this, a light comes on top, pointed in my eyes.

Still can't see anything.

I can see it was just some cartoon or TV show, blaring, really, really, really loud. The man doesn't have sensitive hearing.

getting going...saying hello... he's bland...

me: "...blah blah, except I've been stopped and frisked..."

Suddenly, there it is. He's paying attention. He gets this almost pissy, hurt tone: "Why did you get stopped and frisked?"

(I've heard this kind of thing 3 times now. You say something, they think something, and suddenly get intent, asking an open-ended question)

Look down, do aww shucks, think visibly: " I don't wanna hafta give you my life story. I'm just walking out at night, and I wanted to meet you."

He relaxes a little.

"I called the admin number a few days ago*, to tell them, also."

"I'm a nice guy**, just a little nervous."

As I go off -- "My name is Caleb..."

Different cop, same shift in tone.

He probably fell asleep, or maybe he was jerking off. I don't care, really, as long as they leave me alone.


* In order for this to be effective, I would have to call once every shift, every night. They have no memory, it seems.

** True, broadly, for many definitions of "nice" and "guy" and all possible implications of combinations

Last edited by calebprime; 6th March 2016 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 6th March 2016, 08:33 AM   #243
calebprime
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imo, 69dodge is a major badass.

This is my stand. I will not retreat from it. I will not compromise.

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Old 6th March 2016, 10:59 AM   #244
calebprime
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...Kreek's Notebook plays...

The Dodge-meister, puttering along, will probably make all this horrible work by hand unnecessary, so I'm just going to paste what I have so far on the next step.

Once the app is to the next step, perfection is achievable.

This is a mess, but it's evidence that I was once alive, and I did the work.

I'm a coward, but not weenie. (Or maybe the other way 'round?)

Code:
 
stub:  Babbitt and the tonal/serial "pun".

Manny and another death from medical error. (3rd leading cause of death in US) ?

Fur (in scale-lists, if not applied math ) is good.

You've been practicing



"Balanced Structures"




NEW NOTE:  AS WORK ON THE INTERVAL-CYCLES PROGRESSES, Modally-Shifted
duplicates are found and placed together.

This introduces what seems like discontinuities in the list.





These are all from lists above:  This is a selection of the best of the best, sir!

Section of selected "Balanced Structures"  having from [2-3 of 5] to [3-6 of 8] "altered" tones:


5-note

8,3,6,5,2,8,3,6,5,2          0,8,11,| 5,10

3,6,5,2,8,3,6,5,2,8          0,3,9,| 2,4,


No-"Wolf" 5-and-6-note Lists 

"balanced"
A, C-, D,  D#,  F#-, G#: 5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2   0,5,10,|0,5,10       
A, C-, C#-,D#,  F#-,G-:  5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5   0,5,7,|0,5,7  same as in w.t. list          
A, Bb, C#-,D#,  E,  G-:  2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5   0,2,7,|0,2,7                

"balanced"
A, C#-,E,  F#-, G#-: 7,7,3,4,3,7,7,3,4,3         0,7,|2,5,8
A, B,  C#-,E,   G#-: 4,3,7,7,3,4,3,7,7,3         0,4,7,|2,9
A, B-, D,  F#-, G:   3,7,7,3,4,3,7,7,3,4         0,3,10,|5,8
A, C#-,D,  E,   F#-: 7,3,4,3,7,7,3,4,3,7         0,7,10,|2,5
A, B-, C#-,D,   F#-: 3,4,3,7,7,3,4,3,7,7         0,3,7,10,|5   hexatonic subset, see below.


==================================================================
A sorting of quarter-tone scales by left-most pack to right-most pack:
Just the "balanced" ones.  A w over a position-number means: where-a-wolf?


Scale pitch-names, scale names                    Fingering, abs.     Fingering, relative
and Interval cycle underneath

------------------------------------------------------------------
four of these:
                                                                            w
A,Bb,C,D-,Eb,F,G- like Bb Ion.                    A,B,D#,f#,A,C#,E    0,2,6,9,|0,4,7
2,4,3,3,4,3,5,2,4,3,3,4,3,5,


A,B-,C#,D,E,F#-,G                                 A,C,F,G,B,D,F       0,3,8,10,|2,5,8
3,5,2,4,3,3,4,3,5,2,4,3,3,4,


A,B,C#-,D,E,F#-,G# like A Ion.                    A,C#,E,G,B,D,G      0,4,7,10|2,5,10    
4,3,3,4,3,5,2,4,3,3,4,3,5,2,


A,B,C#-,D#,E,F#,G#- like E Ion.                   A,C#,E,A,B,D#,F#    0,4,7,|0,2,6,9   
4,3,5,2,4,3,3,4,3,5,2,4,3,3,

------------------------------------------------------------------






                               w
Maqam Higaz-kar  0,2,7,10, |2,4,9 would go here,
2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3,

------------------------------------------------------------------

4 of these
                                                                       w?w
A,Bb,C#-,D,E,F#-,G like D har maj/min.            A,B,E,G,B,D,F       0,2,7,10,|2,5,8
2,5,3,4,3,3,4,2,5,3,4,3,3,4,

A,B-,C,D,Eb,F#-,G                                 A,C,D#,G,A,D,F      0,3,6,10,|0,5,8
3,3,4,2,5,3,4,3,3,4,2,5,3,4,

A B-,C#-,D-,E,F#-,G#-                             A,C,E,F#,B,D,F#     0,3,7,9,|2,5,9
3,4,2,5,3,4,3,3,4,2,5,3,4,3,

A,B,C,D#-,E,F#,G#-                                A,C#,D#,G#,B,D#,F#  0,4,6,11,|2,6,9
4,2,5,3,4,3,3,4,2,5,3,4,3,3,


 
------------------------------------------------------------------




============================================================================================

A,B-,C,D,E,F#-,G   Maqam Hussaini, Ushaq,         A,C,D#,G,B,D,F      0,3,6,10,|2,5,8
3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,

A,B-,C#-,D#-,E,F#-,G#- Sikah/Nahawand             A,C,E,G#,B,D,F#     0,3,7,11,|2,5,9
3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,

A,B,C#-,D,E,F#-,G Bayati                          A,C#,E,G,B,D,F      0,4,7,10|2,5,8
4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,

A,B,C#-,D,E,F#,G#- Rast (Wiki)                    A,C#,E,G,B,D#,F#    0,4,7,10|2,6,9
4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,

A,B,C#,D#-,E,F#,G#- like E Ion.  mode of Rast     A,C#,F,G#,B,D#,F#   0,4,8,11,|2,6,9
4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,


Five modes of the same scale: These are already listed in the 65-scale list, above:

3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4 Hussaini, Ushaq,   0,3,6,10,|2,5,8 

4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3 Rast,              0,4,7,10,|2,6,9    

3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3 Sikah (Segah),     0,3,7,11,|2,5,9,   

4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4 Miha'il Musaqa: Egypt  0,4,7,10,|2,5,8  called Bayati

4,4,3,3,4,3,3,4,4,3,3,4,3,3                    0,4,8,11, |2,6,9


==================================================================================

A,B-,C#,D,E,F#-,G                                  A,C,E,G,B,D,E                                                                       
3,4,3,4,3,2,5,3,4,3,4,3,2,5,                      (0,3,7,10 | 2,5,7)?           Only one?



==================================================================================

Dastgah-e Chahargah     0,3,8,10,|2,5,10 -- would go here 
3,5,2,4,3,5,3,5,2,4,3,5,

-----------------------------------
selected modes of Dastgah-e Chahargah  3,5,2,4,3,5,2,  These are not part of the 65-scale list, 
because of prohibition against 0,2,5 spacing.

3,5,2,4,3,5,2,3,5,2,4,3,5,2      0,3,8,10,|2,5,10    C,Eb,Ab,Bb,D,F,Bb, Dastgah-e Chahargah

5,2,4,3,5,2,3,5,2,4,3,5,2,3      0,5,7,11,| 2,7,9

2,4,3,5,2,3,5,2,4,3,5,2,3,5      0,2,6,9,| 2,4,7,   

4,3,5,2,3,5,2,4,3,5,2,3,5,2      0,4,7, | 0,2,5,10

2,3,5,2,4,3,5,2,3,5,2,4,3,2      0,2,5,10,|0,4,7


==================================================================================


 
==================================================================================

A,B,C#-,D,E,F,G#-                                 A,C#,E,G,B,C#,F#    0,4,7,10|2,4,9 
4,3,3,3,2,5,3,4,3,3,3,2,5,3,



==================================================================================


A,B-,C#-,D,E,F#-,G                                A,C,E,G,B,D,F       0,3,7,10,|2,5,8
3,4,3,4,3,3,4,3,4,3,4,3,3,4,


A,B-,C#-,D,E,F#-,G#-    Sikah Baladi              A,C,E,G,B,D,F#      0,3,7,10,|2,5,9
3,4,3,4,3,4,3,3,4,3,4,3,4,3,
                                                         w                    w
 
A,B,C#-,D,E,F#-,G#-                               A,C#,E,G,B,D,F#     0,4,7,10|2,5,9
4,3,3,4,3,4,3,4,3,3,4,3,4,3,

A,B,C#-,D#-,E,F#-,G#-   mode of Sikah Baladi      A,C#,E,G#,B,D,F#    0,4,7,11|2,5,9
4,3,4,3,3,4,3,4,3,4,3,3,4,3,

A,B,C#-,D#-,E,F#,G#-    Sikah Baladi              A,C#,E,G#,B,D#,F#   0,4,7,11|2,6,9
4,3,4,3,4,3,3,4,3,4,3,4,3,3,


==================================================================================





A,B,C#,D#-,E,F#,G# like E Ion.                    A,C#,F,G#,B,D#,G    0,4,8,11,|2,6,10
4,4,3,3,4,4,2,4,4,3,3,4,4,2

A,C-,C#-,D#-,E,F#-,G#-                            A,D,F,G#,B,D,F#     0,5,8,11,|2,5,9
5,3,3,3,3,4,3,5,3,3,3,3,4,3,

=====================================================================================================

This is not part of the b-65-scale list, above. (Spacing rule. This has 0,2,5 and 0,2,4):

2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3 Maqam Higaz-kar  0,2,7,10, |2,4,9

5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2                  0,5,8,    |0,2,7,9

3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5                  0,3,7,9, | 2,5,7 
                                                  w
4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3                  0,4,6,11,| 2,4,9

2,5,3,2,5,3,4,2,5,3,2,5,3,4                  0,2,7,10, |0,5,8





-----------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------
Quarter-tone Variations of Symmetrical Scales

6-note: 

Quarter-tone alterations of "whole-tone"

---------------------------------------------------------------

List:

Pitches:                                  Relative positions:
                    
A,  B-,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G-               0   3   7   11   | 4   7  
3,4,4,5,3,5,3,4,4,5,3,5,
   
A,  B-,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G                0   3   7   11   | 4   8
3,4,4,5,4,4,3,4,4,5,4,4,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G+               0   3   7   11   | 4   9
3,4,4,5,5,3,3,4,4,5,5,3,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#-, F+,  G                0   3   7   11   | 5   8
3,4,4,6,3,4,3,4,4,6,3,4

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G-               0   3   7  |0      4   7     
3,4,5,4,3,5,3,4,5,4,3,5

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G                0   3   7  |0      4   8
3,4,5,4,4,4,3,4,5,4,4,4,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G+               0   3   7  |0      4   9
3,4,5,4,5,3,3,4,5,4,5,3,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G-               0   3   7  |0      5   7
3,4,5,5,2,5,3,4,5,5,2,5,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G                0   3   7  |0      5   8
3,4,5,5,3,4,3,4,5,5,3,4,

A,  B-,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   3   7  |0      5   9
3,4,3,5,4,3,3,4,3,5,4,3,

-------------------------------------
A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F,   G-               0   3   8   11   | 4   7                 * alternating 3,5
3,5,3,5,3,5,3,5,3,5,3,5

A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F,   G                0   3   8   11   | 4   8   
3,5,3,5,4,4,3,5,3,5,4,4,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F,   G+               0   3   8   11   | 4   9
3,5,3,5,5,3,3,5,3,5,5,3,

-------------------------------------

A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G-               0   3   8   11   | 5   7
3,5,3,6,2,5,3,5,3,6,2,5,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G-               0   3   9   11   | 4   7
3,6,2,5,3,5,3,6,2,5,3,5,  


A    C-   C#   E    F    G#-              0,5,8,| 2,4,9
5,3,6,2,5,3,5,3,6,2,5,3,


A		Bb+		C# 		D+		f+		F#+               0   3   8  11     |5   7
3,5,3,6,2,5,3,5,3,6,2,5, 



-------------------------------------

A,	 Bb+, c#+,  D+,	F,	 F#+,              0   5    9   11   | 4   7
5,4,2,5,3,5,5,4,2,5,3,5, 



A,  B+,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G-               0   5   9   11   | 4   7
5,4,2,5,3,5,5,4,2,5,3,5,



--------------------------------------------------------
A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G                0   3   8   11   | 5   8
3,5,3,6,3,4,3,5,3,6,3,4,


A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G-               0   3   9  |0      4   7
3,6,3,4,3,5,3,6,3,4,3,5,


A    C-   C#   E    F+   G#-              0,5,8,| 2,5,9
5,3,6,3,4,3,5,3,6,3,4,3,


--------------------------------------------------------


A,  B-,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G+               0   3   8   11   | 5   9
3,5,3,6,4,3,3,5,3,6,4,3,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#,  F,   G-               0   3   8  |0      4   7
3,5,4,4,3,5,3,5,4,4,3,5,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#,  F,   G+               0   3   8  |0      4   9
3,5,4,4,5,3,3,5,4,4,5,3,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G-               0   3   8  |0      5   7
3,5,4,5,2,5,3,5,4,5,2,5,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G                0   3   8  |0      5   8
3,5,4,5,3,4,3,5,4,5,3,4,

A,  B-,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G+               0   3   8  |0      5   9
3,5,4,5,4,3,3,5,4,5,4,3,

-------------------------------------

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G                0   3   9   11   | 4   8    
3,6,2,5,4,4,3,6,2,5,4,4

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G+               0   3   9   11   | 4   9  
3,6,2,5,5,3,3,6,2,5,5,3,
                                         
                                        
A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G                0   3   9  |0      4   8
3,6,3,4,4,4,3,6,3,4,4,4,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G+               0   3   9  |0      4   9
3,6,3,4,5,3,3,6,3,4,5,3,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F+,  G                0   3   9  |0      5   8
3,6,3,5,3,4,3,6,3,5,3,4,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   3   9  |0      5   9
3,6,3,5,4,3,3,6,3,5,4,3,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F,   G-               0   4   7   11   | 4   7               
4,3,4,5,3,5,4,3,4,5,3,5,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F,   G                0   4   7   11   | 4   8
4,3,4,5,4,4,4,3,4,5,4,4

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F,   G+               0   4   7   11   | 4   9 
4,3,4,5,5,3,4,3,4,5,5,3,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F+,  G-               0   4   7   11   | 5   7
4,3,4,6,2,5,4,3,4,6,2,5,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F+,  G                0   4   7   11   | 5   8
4,3,4,6,3,4,4,3,4,6,3,4,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#-, F+,  G+               0   4   7   11   | 5   9
4,3,4,6,4,3,4,3,4,6,4,3,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#,  F,   G-               0   4   7  |0      4   7
4,3,5,4,3,5,4,3,5,4,3,5

A,  B,   C#-,  D#,  F,   G+               0   4   7  |0      4   9
4,3,5,4,5,3,4,3,5,4,5,3,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#,  F+,  G-               0   4   7  |0      5   7     A,C#,E, | A,D,E
4,3,5,5,2,5,4,3,5,5,2,5,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#,  F+,  G                0   4   7  |0      5   8
4,3,5,5,3,4,4,3,5,5,3,4,

A,  B,   C#-,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   4   7  |0      5   9
4,3,5,5,4,3,4,3,5,5,4,3,

A,  B,   C#,   D#-, F,   G-               0   4   8   11   | 4   7
4,4,3,5,3,5,4,4,3,5,3,5,

A,  B,   C#,   D#-, F,   G+               0   4   8   11   | 4   9
4,4,3,5,5,3,4,4,3,5,5,3,

A,  B,   C#,   D#-, F+,  G-               0   4   8   11   | 5   7
4,4,3,6,2,5,4,4,3,6,2,5,

A,  B,   C#,   D#-, F+,  G                0   4   8   11   | 5   8
4,4,3,6,3,4,4,4,3,6,3,4,

A,  B,   C#,   D#-, F+,  G+               0   4   8   11   | 5   9
4,4,3,6,4,3,4,4,3,6,4,3,

A,  B,   C#,   D#,  F+,  G-               0   4   8  |0      5   7
4,4,4,5,2,5,4,4,4,5,2,5,

A,  B,   C#,   D#,  F+,  G+               0   4   8  |0      5   9
4,4,4,5,4,3,4,4,4,5,4,3,

---------------------------------------------------
A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F,   G-               0   4   9   11   | 4   7
4,5,2,5,3,5,4,5,2,5,3,5,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F,   G                0   4   9   11   | 4   8
4,5,2,5,4,4,4,5,2,5,4,4,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F,   G+               0   4   9   11   | 4   9
4,5,2,5,5,3,4,5,2,5,5,3,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F+,  G-               0   4   9   11   | 5   7
4,5,2,6,2,5,4,5,2,6,2,5,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F+,  G                0   4   9   11   | 5   8
4,5,2,6,3,4,4,5,2,6,3,4,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#-, F+,  G+               0   4   9   11   | 5   9
4,5,2,6,4,3,4,5,2,6,4,3,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#,  F,   G-               0   4   9  |0      4   7
4,5,3,4,3,5,4,5,3,4,3,5,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#,  F,   G+               0   4   9  |0      4   9
4,5,3,4,5,3,4,5,3,4,5,3,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#,  F+,  G-               0   4   9  |0      5   7
4,5,3,5,2,5,4,5,3,5,2,5,

A,  B,   C#+,  D#,  F+,  G                0   4   9  |0      5   8
4,5,3,5,3,4,4,5,3,5,3,4, 

A,  B,   C#+,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   4   9  |0      5   9
4,5,3,5,4,3,4,5,3,5,4,3,

---------------------------------------------------
A,  B+,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G-               0   5   7   11   | 4   7
5,2,4,5,3,5,5,2,4,5,3,5,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G                0   5   7   11   | 4   8
5,2,4,5,4,4,5,2,4,5,4,4,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#-, F,   G+               0   5   7   11   | 4   9
5,2,4,5,5,3,5,2,4,5,5,3,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#-, F+,  G                0   5   7   11   | 5   8
5,2,4,6,3,4,5,2,4,6,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G-               0   5   7  |0      4   7
5,2,5,4,3,5,5,2,5,4,3,5,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G                0   5   7  |0      4   8
5,2,5,4,4,4,5,2,5,4,4,4,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F,   G+               0   5   7  |0      4   9
5,2,5,4,5,3,5,2,5,4,5,3,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G-               0   5   7  |0      5   7    
5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,5,2,5,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G                0   5   7  |0      5   8
5,2,5,5,3,4,5,2,5,5,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#-,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   5   7  |0      5   9
5,2,5,5,4,3,5,2,5,5,4,3,

---------------------------------------------------
A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F,   G-               0   5   8   11   | 4   7
5,3,3,5,3,5,5,3,3,5,3,5,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F,   G                0   5   8   11   | 4   8
5,3,3,5,4,4,5,3,3,5,4,4,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F,   G+               0   5   8   11   | 4   9
5,3,3,5,5,3,5,3,3,5,5,3,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G-               0   5   8   11   | 5   7
5,3,3,6,2,5,5,3,3,6,2,5,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G                0   5   8   11   | 5   8
5,3,3,6,3,4,5,3,3,6,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#-, F+,  G+               0   5   8   11   | 5   9
5,3,3,6,4,3,5,3,3,6,4,3,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#,  F,   G-               0   5   8  |0      4   7
5,3,4,4,3,5,5,3,4,4,3,5,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#,  F,   G+               0   5   8  |0      4   9
5,3,4,4,5,3,5,3,4,4,5,3,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G-               0   5   8  |0      5   7
5,3,4,5,2,5,5,3,4,5,2,5,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G                0   5   8  |0      5   8
5,3,4,5,3,4,5,3,4,5,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#,   D#,  F+,  G+               0   5   8  |0      5   9
5,3,4,5,4,3,5,3,4,5,4,3,




---------------------------------------------------
A,  B+,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G                0   5   9   11   | 4   8
5,4,2,5,4,4,5,4,2,5,4,4,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#-, F,   G+               0   5   9   11   | 4   9
5,4,2,5,5,3,5,4,2,5,5,3,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#-, F+,  G                0   5   9   11   | 5   8
5,4,2,6,3,4,5,4,2,6,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G-               0   5   9  |0      4   7
5,4,3,4,3,5,5,4,3,4,3,5,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G                0   5   9  |0      4   8
5,4,3,4,4,4,5,4,3,4,4,4,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#,  F,   G+               0   5   9  |0      4   9
5,4,3,4,5,3,5,4,3,4,5,3,
 
A,  B+,  C#+,  D#,  F+,  G                0   5   9  |0      5   8
5,4,3,5,3,4,5,4,3,5,3,4,

A,  B+,  C#+,  D#,  F+,  G+               0   5   9  |0      5   9
5,4,3,5,4,3,5,4,3,5,4,3

============================================================================

List:

A		Bb		C#-		d-		F		F#                0   2   7  9      |4   6
2,5,2,7,2,6,2,5,2,7,2,6

A		Bb		c#+		D+		f+		F#+               0   2   9  11     |5   7
2,7,2,6,2,5,2,7,2,6,2,5,

A    C-   c#-  E    F    G#                        0,5,7,| 2,4,10
5,2,7,2,6,2,5,2,7,2,6,2,





--------------------------------------------------------

A		Bb		C#-		d-		F		F#+               0   2   7  9      |4   7
2,5,2,7,3,5,2,5,2,7,3,5,

A    C-   c#-  E    F+   G#                        0,5,7,| 2,5,10
5,2,7,3,5,2,5,2,7,3,5,2,

--------------------------------------------------------


A		Bb		C#-		d-		f+		F#+               0   2   7  9      |5   7
2,5,2,8,2,5,2,5,2,8,2,5,



--------------------------------------------------------
A		Bb		C#-		D		F		F#+               0   2   7  10     |4   7
2,5,3,6,3,5,2,5,3,6,3,5,

A    C-   C#   E    F+   G#                        0,5,8,| 2,5,10
5,3,6,3,5,2,5,3,6,3,5,2,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#,  F+,  G-                       s 0   3   9  |0      5   7
3,6,3,5,2,5,3,6,3,5,2,5,




--------------------------------------------------------

============================================================================

A		Bb		C#-		D		f+		F#+               0   2   7  10     |5   7
2,5,3,7,2,5,2,5,3,7,2,5,

A    c+   C#+  E    F    G#-                       0,7,9,| 2,4,9
7,2,5,2,5,3,7,2,5,2,5,3,


============================================================================

A		Bb		C#-		D+		F		F#                0   2   7  11     |4   6
2,5,4,5,2,6,2,5,4,5,2,6,

A		Bb		C#-		D+		F		F#+               0   2   7  11     |4   7
2,5,4,5,3,5,2,5,4,5,3,5,

A		Bb		C#-		D+		f+		F#+               0   2   7  11     |5   7
2,5,4,6,2,5,2,5,4,6,2,5


==============================================================================
A		Bb		C# 		D		f+		F#+               0   2   8  10     |5   7
2,6,2,7,2,5,2,6,2,7,2,5,

A		Bb		c#+		D+		F		F#                0   2   9  11     |4   6
2,7,2,5,2,6,2,7,2,5,2,6,

A      c+   C#+  E    F    G#                      0,7,9,| 2,4,10
7,2,5,2,6,2,7,2,5,2,6,2,


============================================================================== 

A		Bb		C# 		D+		F		F#+               0   2   8  11     |4   7
2,6,3,5,3,5,2,6,3,5,3,5,

A		Bb		C# 		D+		f+		F#+               0   2   8  11     |5   7
2,6,3,6,2,5,2,6,3,6,2,5



--------------------------------------------------------

A		Bb		c#+		D+		F		F#+               0   2   9  11     |4   7
2,7,2,5,3,5,2,7,2,5,3,5,


A    C-   c#-  E    F    G#-          0,5,7,| 2,4,9 
5,2,7,2,5,3,5,2,7,2,5,3,

          w
A    c+   C#+  E    F+   G#           0,7,9,| 2,5,10   
7,2,5,3,5,2,7,2,5,3,5,2,


A		Bb+		C# 		D		f+		F#+               0   3   8  10     |5   7
3,5,2,7,2,5,3,5,2,7,2,5




--------------------------------------------------------



A		Bb+		C#-		d-		F		F#                0   3   7  9      |4   6
3,4,2,7,2,6,3,4,2,7,2,6,

A		Bb+		C#-		d-		F		F#+               0   3   7  9      |4   7
3,4,2,7,3,5,3,4,2,5,3,5,

A		Bb+		C#-		d-		f+		F#+               0   3   7  9      |5   7
3,4,2,8,2,5,3,4,2,8,2,5,

================================================================================
A		Bb+	 	C#-		D		F		F#                0   3   7  10     |4   6
3,4,3,6,2,6,3,4,3,6,2,6,

A,  B-,  C#+,  D#-, F+,  G                         0   3   9   11   | 5   8
3,6,2,6,3,4,3,6,2,6,3,4,

A    C    C#   E    F+   G#-          0,6,8,| 2,5,9
6,2,6,3,4,3,6,2,6,3,4,3,

================================================================================

A		Bb+		C#-		D		F		F#+               0   3   7  10     |4   7
3,4,3,6,3,5,3,4,3,6,3,5,

=============================================================================
A		Bb+		C#-		D		f+		F#+               0   3   7  10     |5   7
3,4,3,7,2,5,3,4,3,7,2,5,

A    c+   C#+  E    F+   G#-                       0,7,9,| 2,5,9
7,2,5,3,4,3,7,2,5,3,4,3,

=============================================================================

A		Bb+		C#-		D+		F		F#                0   3   7  11     |4   6
3,4,4,5,2,6,3,4,4,5,2,6,

A		Bb+		C#-		D+		F		F#+               0   3   7  11     |4   7
3,4,4,5,3,5,3,4,4,5,3,5,

A		Bb+		C#-	 	D		F		F#+               0   3   7  10     |4   7
3,4,3,6,3,5,3,4,3,6,3,5,

A		Bb+		C# 		D		F		F#                0   3   8  10     |4   6
3,5,2,6,2,6,3,5,2,6,2,6,

A		Bb+		C# 		D		F		F#+               0   3   8  10     |4   7
3,5,2,6,3,5,3,5,2,6,3,5,


A		Bb+		C# 		D+		F		F#                0   3   8  10     |4   6
3,5,2,6,2,6,3,5,2,6,2,6,

A		Bb+		C# 		D+		F		F#+               0   3   8  10     |4   7
3,5,2,6,3,5,3,5,2,6,3,5,

A		Bb+		c#+		D+		F		F#                0   3   9  11     |4   6
3,6,2,5,2,6,3,6,2,5,2,6,

A		Bb+		c#+		D+		f+		F#+               0   3   9  11     |5   7
3,6,2,6,2,5,3,6,2,6,2,5,

==================================================================

------------------------------------------------------------------
8-note:

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  8-equal   

------------------------------------------------------------------ 

List:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
modes of same thing:

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   7    11 |   2   5   7 
2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5, 

A    B+   C+   D    eb   F    F#+  G#                        0,5,7,10, | 0,4,7,10
5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2, 

A    B    C+   D    eb   f+   F#+  G#                        0,4,7,10, | 0,5,7,10
4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                     
        
A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   7    11 |   2   5   8
2,3,2,4,3,3,3,4,2,3,2,4,3,3,3,4,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   7    11 |   2   5   9
2,3,2,4,3,3,4,3,2,3,2,4,3,3,4,3,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   2   5   7    11 |   2   6   8
2,3,2,4,3,4,2,4,2,3,2,4,3,4,2,4,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   7    11 |   2   6   9
2,3,2,4,3,4,3,3,2,3,2,4,3,4,3,3,


--------------------------------------------------------

There are 2 in the list:

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   7    11 |   2   7   9
2,3,2,4,3,5,2,3,2,3,2,4,3,5,2,3,

A    B-   c-   D-   eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,3,5,9,| 0,5,7,10
3,2,4,3,5,2,3,2,3,2,4,3,5,2,3,2,




--------------------------------------------------------

there are 3 in the list:

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   7    |0     2   5   7
2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,

A    B+   C+   D    eb   f+   F#+  G#                        0,5,7,10, | 0,5,7,10
5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,


A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   7   9    |0     2   7   9
2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,2,5,2,3,


--------------------------------------------------------





A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   7    |0     2   5   8
2,3,2,5,2,3,3,4,2,3,2,5,2,3,3,4,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   7    |0     2   5   9  
2,3,2,5,2,3,4,3,2,3,2,5,2,3,4,3,  

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   2   5   7    |0     2   6   8       
2,3,2,5,2,4,2,4,2,3,2,5,2,4,2,4,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   7    |0     2   6   9   
2,3,2,5,2,4,3,3,2,3,2,5,2,4,3,3,

A    Bb   C- <--db-   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   7    |0     2   7   9     
2,3,2,5,2,5,2,3,2,3,2,5,2,5,2,3,

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   8    11 |   2   5   7
2,3,3,3,3,3,2,5,2,3,3,3,3,3,2,5,

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   8    11 |   2   5   8                    
2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   8    11 |   2   5   9    
2,3,3,3,3,3,4,3,2,3,3,3,3,3,4,3,
              
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 5:

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   2   5   8    11 |   2   6   8                   
2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   2   5   9    11 |   2   6   8
2,3,4,2,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,


A    Bb   C     Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   6   8    11 |   2   5   8
2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4


A    B-   C    D-   eb   F    F#   G#      0,3,6,9, | 0,4,6,10
3,3,3,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,2,


A    B-   C    D    eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,6,10,| 0,4,6,9
3,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,3,3,4,2,4,2,3,3,



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

three of these

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   8    11 |   2   6   9                  
2,3,3,3,3,4,3,3,2,3,3,3,3,4,3,3


A    B-   C    D-   eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,6,9, | 0,4,7,10
3,3,3,3,4,3,3,2,3,3,3,3,4,3,3,2,


A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   3   6   8    11 |   2   5   8
3,3,2,3,3,3,3,4,3,3,2,3,3,3,3,4,


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   8    |0     2   5   7
2,3,3,4,2,3,2,5,2,3,3,4,2,3,2,5

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

there are 3:

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   8    |0     2   5   8
2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   9    |0     2   5   8
2,3,4,3,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4


A    B    C     D-    eb    F     F#     G#-     0,4,6,9, | 0,4,6,9
4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,4,2,3,3,



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   8    |0     2   5   9
2,3,3,4,2,3,4,3,2,3,3,4,2,3,4,3,



--------------------------------------------------------

there are 3: 

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   8    |0     2   6   9
2,3,3,4,2,4,3,3,2,3,3,4,2,4,3,3



A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   3   6   8    11 |   2   6   8
3,3,2,3,3,4,2,4,3,3,2,3,3,4,2,4


A    B-   C    D    eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,6,10,| 0,4,7,10
3,3,4,2,4,3,3,2,3,3,4,2,4,3,3,2,



--------------------------------------------------------
there are 3:                       8 notes


A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   8    |0     2   7   9
2,3,3,4,2,5,2,3,2,3,3,4,2,5,2,3


A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   2   7   9    |0     2   5   8
2,5,2,3,2,3,3,4,2,5,2,3,2,3,3,4,



A    B-   C    D    eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,3,6,10,| 0,5,7,10
3,3,4,2,5,2,3,2,3,3,4,2,5,2,3,2,

--------------------------------------------------------




A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   9    11 |   2   5   7
2,3,4,2,3,3,2,5,2,3,4,2,3,3,2,5

A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   5   9   11 |   2   5   8
2,3,4,3,3,3,3,4,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 


A    B-   C+   D-   eb   F    F#   G#      0,3,7,9, | 0,4,6,10 
3,4,2,3,4,2,4,2,3,4,2,3,4,2,4,2,

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   9    11 |   2   6   9
2,3,4,2,3,4,3,3,2,3,3,3,3,4,3,3,

A    B-   C+   D-   eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,7,9, | 0,4,7,10 
3,4,2,3,4,3,3,2,3,4,2,3,4,3,3,2,




--------------------------------------------------------

There are 4


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   9    11 |   2   7   9
2,3,4,2,3,5,2,3,2,3,3,3,3,5,2,3,

A    Bb   C-    Db    Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   8    11 |   2   7   9 
2,3,3,3,3,5,2,3,2,3,3,3,3,5,2,3


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   5   9    |0     2   5   7
2,3,4,3,2,3,2,5,2,3,3,4,2,3,2,5



A    B-   C    D-   eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,3,6,9, | 0,5,7,10
3,3,3,3,5,2,3,2,3,3,3,3,5,2,3,2,

--------------------------------------------------------


only 1?


A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   9    |0     2   5   9
2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,2,3,3,4,2,3,4,3,






-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   5   9    |0     2   6   9
2,3,4,3,2,4,3,3,2,3,3,4,2,4,3,3

A    B-   C+   D    eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,7,10,| 0,4,7,10
3,4,3,2,4,3,3,2,3,4,3,2,4,3,3,2,

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   6   9    |0     2   5   9
2,4,3,3,2,3,4,3,2,4,3,3,2,3,4,3


-------------------------------------------------------------

there are 3:

A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   5   9   |0     2   7   9
2,3,4,3,2,5,2,3,2,3,3,4,2,5,2,3

A    B-   C+   D    eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,3,7,10,| 0,5,7,10
3,4,3,2,5,2,3,2,3,4,3,2,5,2,3,2,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   7   9    |0     2   5   9
2,5,2,3,2,3,4,3,2,5,2,3,2,3,4,3,



-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db    Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   6   8    11 |   2   5   7
2,4,2,3,3,3,2,5,2,4,2,3,3,3,2,5,

A
-------------------------------------------------------------
There are 2:

A    Bb   C     Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   6   8    11 |   2   5   9
2,4,2,3,3,3,4,3,2,4,2,3,3,3,4,3


A    B-   C+   D    eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,7,10,| 0,4,6,9
3,4,3,2,4,2,3,3,3,4,3,2,4,2,3,3,


-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db    Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   6   8    11 |   2   6   9
2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3


A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   3   6   8    |0     2   5   7
3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,


A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   3   6   8    |0     2   5   8
3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,


A    B    C    D-   eb   F    F#+  G#      0,4,6,9, | 0,4,7,10
4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,


A    B    C+   D    eb   F    F#   G#-     0,4,7,10, | 0,4,6,9
4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3,4,3,3,2,4,2,3,3



-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db    Eb-   E     F#+    G+                        0   2   6   8    11 |   2   7   9
2,4,2,3,3,5,2,3,2,4,2,3,3,5,2,3


A    B+   C+   D    eb   F    F#   G#-     0,5,7,10, | 0,4,6,9
5,2,3,2,4,2,3,3,5,2,3,2,4,2,3,3,


A    B    C    D-   eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,4,6,9, | 0,5,7,10
4,2,3,3,5,2,3,2,4,2,3,3,5,2,3,2,




-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db    Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   6   8    |0     2   5   7
2,4,2,4,2,3,2,5,2,4,2,4,2,3,2,5



-------------------------------------------------------------
There are two:



A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   2   5   9    |0     2   6   8
2,3,4,3,2,4,2,4,2,3,4,3,2,4,2,4, 


A    Bb   C     Db    Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   2   6   8    |0     2   5   9
2,4,2,4,2,3,4,3,2,4,2,4,2,3,4,3


A    B-   C+   D    eb   F    F#   G#      0,3,7,10,| 0,4,6,10
3,4,3,2,4,2,4,2,3,4,3,2,4,2,4,2,



-------------------------------------------------------------


A    Bb   C     Db    Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   6   8    |0     2   6   9          
2,4,2,4,2,4,3,3,2,4,2,4,2,4,3,3




A    Bb   C     Db    Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   6   8    |0     2   7   9
2,4,2,4,2,5,2,3,2,4,2,4,2,5,2,3

A    B+   C+   D    eb   F    F#   G#                        0,5,7,10, | 0,4,6,10
5,2,3,2,4,2,4,2,5,2,3,2,4,2,4,2

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   2   7   9    |0     2   6   8
2,5,2,3,2,4,2,4,2,5,2,3,2,4,2,4,

A    B    C    D    eb   f+   F#+  G#                        0,4,6,10, | 0,5,7,10
4,2,4,2,5,2,3,2,4,2,4,2,5,2,3,2,

-------------------------------------------------------------




A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   6   9    11 |   2   5   7
2,4,3,2,3,3,2,5,2,4,3,2,3,3,2,5

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   6   9    11 |   2   5   8
2,4,3,2,3,3,3,4,2,4,3,2,3,3,3,4,

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   6   9    11 |   2   5   9
2,4,3,2,3,3,4,3,2,4,3,2,3,3,4,3,



-------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   2   6   9    11 |   2   6   8
2,4,3,2,3,4,2,4,2,4,3,2,3,4,2,4



A    B    C+   D-   eb   F    F#   G#                        0,4,7,9, | 0,4,6,10
4,3,2,3,4,2,4,2,4,3,2,3,4,2,4,2,



------------------------------------------------------------------
A    B    C+   D-   eb   F    F#+  G#      0,4,7,9, | 0,4,7,10
4,3,2,3,4,3,3,2,4,3,2,3,4,3,3,2


A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   6   9    11 |   2   6   9               
2,4,3,2,3,4,3,3,2,4,3,2,3,4,3,3

------------------------------------------------------------------




A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   2   6   9    11 |   2   7   9
2,4,3,2,3,4,2,3,2,4,3,2,3,4,2,3

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   6   9    |0     2   5   7                
2,4,3,3,2,3,2,5,2,4,3,3,2,3,2,5

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   2   6   9    |0     2   6   8
2,4,3,3,2,4,2,4,2,4,3,3,2,4,2,4


------------------------------------------------------------------

A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   6   9    |0     2   6   9
2,4,3,3,2,4,3,3,2,4,3,3,2,4,3,3

A    B    C+   D    eb   F    F#+  G#      0,4,7,10, | 0,4,7,10
4,3,3,2,4,3,3,2,4,3,3,2,4,3,3,2,

------------------------------------------------------------------



A    Bb   C     Db+   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   2   6   9    |0     2   7   9
2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3

==================================================================================================
zone of 012 tension

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   7   9    11 |   2   5   7
2,5,2,2,3,3,2,5,2,5,2,2,3,3,2,5,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   2   7   9    11 |   2   5   8
2,5,2,2,3,3,3,4,2,5,2,2,3,3,3,4,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   7   9    11 |   2   5   9
2,5,2,2,3,3,4,3,2,5,2,2,3,3,4,3,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   2   7   9    11 |   2   6   8
2,5,2,2,3,4,2,4,2,5,2,2,3,4,2,4,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   2   7   9    11 |   2   6   9
2,5,2,2,3,4,3,3,2,5,2,2,3,4,3,3,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   2   7   9    11 |   2   7   9
2,5,2,2,3,5,2,3,2,5,2,2,3,5,2,3
==================================================================================================

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   2   7   9    |0     2   5   7
2,5,2,3,2,3,2,5,2,5,2,3,2,3,2,5,

A    Bb   C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   2   7   9    |0     2   6   9
2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,2,5,2,3,2,4,3,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   3   6   8    11 |   2   5   7
3,3,2,3,3,3,2,5,3,3,2,3,3,3,2,5

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   3   6   8    11 |   2   5   9
3,3,2,3,3,3,4,3,3,3,2,3,3,3,4,3


A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   3   6   9    11 |   2   5   8
3,3,3,2,3,3,3,4,3,3,3,2,3,3,3,4

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   3   6   8    11 |   2   6   9
3,3,2,3,3,4,3,3,3,3,2,3,3,4,3,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   3   6   9    11 |   2   5   9
3,3,3,2,3,3,4,3,3,3,3,2,3,3,4,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   3   6   9    |0     2   5   8
3,3,3,3,2,3,3,4,3,3,3,3,2,3,3,4,
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   3   6   8    11 |   2   7   9
3,3,2,3,3,5,2,3,3,3,2,3,3,5,2,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   3   6   8    |0     2   5   9
3,3,2,4,2,3,4,3,3,3,2,4,2,3,4,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#     G                   0   3   6   8    |0     2   6   8               
3,3,2,4,2,4,2,4,3,3,2,4,2,4,2,4,

A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   3   6   8    |0     2   6   9
3,3,2,4,2,4,3,3,3,3,2,4,2,4,3,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db    Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   3   6   8    |0     2   7   9
3,3,2,4,2,5,2,3,3,3,2,4,2,5,2,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#- <--g-                  0   3   6   9    11 |   2   5   7
3,3,3,2,3,3,2,5,3,3,3,2,3,3,2,5



A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   3   6   9    11 |   2   6   8
3,3,3,2,3,4,2,4,3,3,3,2,3,4,2,4,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   3   6   9    11 |   2   6   9
3,3,3,2,3,5,2,3,3,3,2,3,5,2,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb-   E     F#+    G+                  0   3   6   9    11 |   2   7   9
3,3,3,2,3,5,2,3,3,3,3,2,3,5,2,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   3   6   9    |0     2   5   7
3,3,3,3,2,3,2,5,3,3,3,3,2,3,2,5

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   3   6   9    |0     2   5   9
3,3,3,3,2,3,4,3,3,3,3,3,2,3,4,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   3   6   9    |0     2   6   8
3,3,3,3,2,4,2,4,3,3,3,3,2,4,2,4,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   3   6   9    |0     2   6   9
3,3,3,3,2,4,3,3,3,3,3,3,2,4,3,3,

A    Bb+  C     Db+   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   3   6   9    |0     2   7   9
3,3,3,3,2,5,2,3,3,3,3,3,2,5,2,3,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G                   0   3   7   9    11 |   2   5   8
3,4,2,2,3,3,3,4,3,4,2,2,3,3,3,4,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G                   0   3   7   9    11 |   2   6   8
3,4,2,2,3,4,2,4,3,4,2,2,3,4,2,4

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb-   E     F#     G+                  0   3   7   9    11 |   2   6   9
3,4,2,2,2,3,4,3,3,3,4,2,2,2,3,4,3,3, 

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#- <--g-                  0   3   7   9    |0     2   5   7
3,4,2,3,2,3,2,5,3,4,2,3,2,3,2,5,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   3   7   9    |0     2   5   8
3,4,2,3,2,3,3,4,3,4,2,3,2,3,3,4,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#-    G+                  0   3   7   9    |0     2   5   9
3,4,2,3,2,3,4,3,3,4,2,3,2,3,4,3,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G                   0   3   7   9    |0     2   6   8
3,4,2,3,2,4,2,4,3,4,2,3,2,4,2,4,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#     G+                  0   3   7   9    |0     2   6   9
3,4,2,3,2,4,3,3,3,4,2,3,2,4,3,3,

A    Bb+  C+    Db+   Eb    E     F#+    G+                  0   3   7   9    |0     2   7   9
3,4,2,3,2,5,2,3,3,4,2,3,2,5,2,3,

==================================================================


------------------------------------------------------------------
A    B-   c-   D-   eb-  F    F#   G#-     0,3,5,9,11, |4,6,9 
3,2,4,2,5,2,3,3,3,2,4,2,5,2,3,3,
      
A    B-   c-   D-   eb-  F    F#   G#      0,3,5,9,11, |4,6,10   
3,2,4,2,5,2,4,2,3,2,4,2,5,2,4,2,
      
A    B-   c-   D-   eb-  F    F#+  G#      0,3,5,9,11, |4,7,10 
3,2,4,2,5,3,3,2,3,2,4,2,5,3,3,2,

A    B-   c-   D-   eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,5,9,| 0,4,6,9         
3,2,4,3,4,2,3,3,3,2,4,3,4,2,3,3

A    B-   c-   D-   eb   F    F#   G#      0,3,5,9,| 0,4,6,10
3,2,4,3,4,2,4,2,3,2,4,3,4,2,4,2,

A    B-   c-   D-   eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,5,9,| 0,4,7,10
3,2,4,3,4,3,3,2,3,2,4,3,4,3,3,2,

A    B-   c-   D    eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,5,10,|0,4,6,9    
3,2,5,2,4,2,3,3,3,2,5,2,4,2,3,3,

A    B-   c-   D    eb   F    F#   G#      0,3,5,10,|0,4,6,10
3,2,5,2,4,2,4,2,3,2,5,2,4,2,4,2,

A    B-   c-   D    eb   F    F#+  G#      0,3,5,10,|0,4,7,10
3,2,5,2,4,3,3,2,3,2,5,2,4,3,3,2,

A    B-   c-   D    eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,3,5,10,|0,5,7,10
3,2,5,2,5,2,3,2,3,2,5,2,5,2,3,2,




A    B-   C    D-   eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,6,9, | 0,4,6,9      
3,3,3,3,4,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,2,3,3,

--------------------------------------------------------


--------------------------------------------------------
Only 1?    8 notes

A    B-   C+   D-   eb   F    F#   G#-     0,3,7,9, | 0,4,6,9
3,4,2,3,4,2,3,3,3,4,2,3,4,2,3,3,


--------------------------------------------------------
There are 2:                           8 notes

A    B    C+   D-   eb   F    F#   G#-                       0,4,7,9, | 0,4,6,9       
4,3,2,3,4,2,3,3,4,3,2,3,4,2,3,3,

A    Bb   C-    Db+   Eb-   E     F#-    G+                  0   2   5   9    11 |   2   5   9
2,3,4,2,3,3,4,3,2,3,4,2,3,3,4,3  


------------------------------------------------------------------
? seems unique

A    B    C+   D-   eb   f+   F#+  G#      0,4,7,9, | 0,5,7,10               
4,3,2,3,5,2,3,2,4,3,2,3,5,2,3,2,



------------------------------------------------------------------

hexatonic, the 3,1: A,C,C#,E,F,G#

--------------------------------------------------------
only 1?

A    C-   c#-  E    F+   G#-          0,5,7,| 2,5,9
5,2,7,3,4,3,5,2,7,3,4,3,


END
==================================================================
==================================================================



-------------------------------------------------------------
There are currently 3 in this list:  THIS IS NOT BALANCED, ONLY 1 ODD



A    Bb   C     Db    Eb    E     F#-    G                   0   2   6   8    |0     2   5   8
2,4,2,4,2,3,3,4,2,4,2,4,2,3,3,4


A    B-   C    D    eb   F    F#   G#                        0,3,6,10,| 0,4,6,10
3,3,4,2,4,2,4,2,3,3,4,2,4,2,4,2,


A    B    C    D-   eb   F    F#   G#                        0,4,6,9, | 0,4,6,10
4,2,3,3,4,2,4,2,4,2,3,3,4,2,4,2,


Heh:

Well John Henry went to the Captain
Said the captain, what can you do
I can hoist a jack, I can lay a track
I can pick and shovel too, Lord, Lord
I can pick and shovel too
I can pick and shovel too, Lord, Lord
I can pick and shovel too

Well the captain said to John Henry,
Gonna bring me a steam drill 'round
Gonna bring me a steam drill out on the job
Gonna whup that steel on down, Lord, Lord
Whup that steel on down

Well John Henry said to the captain,
Oh a man ain't nothin' but a man
'Fore I'd let your steam drill beat me down,
I'd die with my hammer in my hand, Lord, Lord
Die with my hammer in my hand

Well John Henry said to the captain,
Looka yonder what I see,
Hole done choke, drill done broke,
And you can't drive steel like me, Lord, Lord
Can't drive steel like me
Oh no, you can't drive steel like me, no no
Can't drive steel like me

Well John Henry drove into the mountain,
His hammer was strikin' fire
He drove so hard he broke his poor heart
And he laid down his hammer and he died, Lord, Lord
Laid down his hammer and he died
He laid down his hammer and he died, Great God
Laid down his hammer and he died

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Old 7th March 2016, 02:58 AM   #245
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Charlie Parker's famous alto break

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxH83kmjpyw

A little solo so amazing that it sort of laps you, catches you from behind, and then laps you again, running backwards.

at around 1:14

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Old 7th March 2016, 07:30 AM   #246
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Old 7th March 2016, 02:26 PM   #247
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Who would win? Dan Pinkham or Mike Zilbur

http://articles.latimes.com/2006/dec...l/me-pinkham21


Quote:
OBITUARIES
Daniel Pinkham, 83; Boston composer, conductor known for organ and choral music
December 21, 2006|From Times Staff and Wire Reports
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Daniel Pinkham, a composer, conductor and teacher at the New England Conservatory and music director of the King's Chapel in Boston since the late 1950s, died Monday of leukemia in Natick, Mass., according to colleagues. He was 83.

Pinkham joined the conservatory faculty in 1958 and was appointed music director at King's Chapel, a historic Unitarian church on Boston's Freedom Trail, the next year.

Best known for his organ and choral music, he was a prolific and generous composer concerned with making his work accessible to the masses, said Heinrich Christensen, the current music director at King's.

Many of Pinkham's anthems now sung around the world were first performed in Boston. His "Christmas Cantata," written for conductor Lorna Cooke de Varon and the New England Conservatory Chorus in 1958, has become a staple of church and school choirs. De Varon cited the piece's "wonderful poignancy and joy" in an interview with the Boston Globe on Monday.



"I am not a sacred composer," Pinkham told the Boston Globe in 2000. "I just like to hear my pieces more than once, and when you write for the church, you have a better chance at that.... I tell my students I'm available for weddings, funerals and bar mitzvahs; I call this the inspiration of the pocketbook."

During his first year at the church, he began a series of Sunday evening concerts, which will celebrate its 50th season next year, the Rev. Earl Holt said.

Pinkham, who often performed on organ and harpsichord, retired as music director in June 2000 and was named Music Director Emeritus of King's Chapel, where a memorial service will be held Saturday.

In 2003 he wrote music for orchestra and narrator to accompany Robert McCloskey's classic children's story "Make Way for Ducklings," in the same vein as Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf."

Christensen said Pinkham continued working until last summer, and his "A Cradle Hymn" had its premiere Sunday night at the Memorial Church in Cambridge, Mass., performed by the Harvard University Choir.

Pinkham was born June 5, 1923, in Lynn, Mass., home of the factory that concocted his great-grandmother Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound for "female complaints."

He received bachelor's and master's degrees in music from Harvard University, where he studied under Aaron Copland and Walter Piston. He also studied composition with Paul Hindemith, Arthur Honegger, Samuel Barber and Nadia Boulanger.

Pinkham is survived by his longtime partner, Andrew Paul Holman, and a brother, Christopher.


The two best lines from the obit:

Quote:
"I am not a sacred composer," Pinkham told the Boston Globe in 2000. "I just like to hear my pieces more than once, and when you write for the church, you have a better chance at that.... I tell my students I'm available for weddings, funerals and bar mitzvahs; I call this the inspiration of the pocketbook."

Quote:
Pinkham was born June 5, 1923, in Lynn, Mass., home of the factory that concocted his great-grandmother Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound for "female complaints."

In the 80's, NEC was equally balanced between what I call The Schuller Wild Men -- rough and smelly men of action, and -- no other way to put it --
the Church Fags. Bear with me. This is neither poisonous nor fair, what I'm trying to say.

Broadly, the Schuller wild men wore buckskin, smelled of hard liquor and patchouli oil, and did as they pleased. They'd pee in the corners of the hallways, gnaw on huge hunks of old meat. But they play good. They didn't go for that churchy stuff. Charles "Chuck" Ives would have been a Schuller Wild Man.

This classification scheme breaks down with someone like Henry Cowell or Harry Partch. Homosexual wild-men of action. Or maybe not.

Quote:
Cowell, who did not consider himself to be homosexual, was arrested and convicted in 1936 on a "morals" charge involving a 17-year-old male.

According to Joel Sachs' Henry Cowell: A Man Made of Music (2015) Cowell pleaded guilty (and so was not convicted or even tried), and the man he had oral sex with was a young adult.

Sentenced to a decade-and-a-half incarceration, he would spend the next four years in San Quentin State Prison.
But he was a heck of an experimentalist, and there's an amazing piece*** of his performed by M. Tilson Thomas and the S.F. Symphony. Really extraordinary.

As for Schuller Wild Men: I don't know if this is true, but names such as : William Thomas McKinley, Ran Blake, Miraslav Vitous, Jaki Byard, George Russell, Joe Maneri, come to mind. Guys. Manly men, men's men.

As Andrew Nadelson once explained to me over a bowl of hash -- as his creditors pursued him relentlessly with threatening phone calls, "Jazz is Butch."

Then, in the other camp were the obviously homosexual Church Fag composers. The only one I can think of off the top of my head -- because I had him for a Music History class -- was Daniel "Dan" Pinkham.

Now, I hated music history, but it was required. I'd heard that Pinkham was actually good, though. I think I had him for Music from the Classical Period, or maybe it was Early Romanticism, I forget now.

What I remember is that Pinkham loved etymology above all else. More, he loved to roll a nice foreign-sounding word around in his mouth in front of the class, and then, eyes sparkling, let it fly in his resonant voice. Just savoring it.

Let's pretend it was clavicembalo. Pinkham would stand up there for a long time, relishing it: "Clavi.. clavi-cem-BALO. BALO, Balo."

Mike Zilber -- who I'd later go on to play with in a mediocre and unlistenable fusion band called Fiction* -- and I sat in the back.

Mike started to heckle Pinkham, who pretended not to notice.

The classroom wasn't big.

Zilber started to make rude noises when Pinkham wasn't looking, farting sounds, rasberries.

I think I tried to shush him, but it was a weak effort on my part.

In recent months, Zilber's CD landed in the library. I took a short listen. The sax was out of tune with the guitar, so I gave up.

Pinkham wrote some good music, had a good sense of humor. And he wasted the class's time with all that stupid oral pleasure of his.

I've been trying to sort out my feelings.

Arnold has helped me to some important insight.

Quote:
"I think that gay marriage should be between a man and a woman." - Arnold Schwarzenegger.
But I still can't figure it out, this ambivalence. I don't care who has sex with whom. Or maybe it's with who.

Mouths are ok.

Heck, I'm a pervert, too. (Props to Steve Prosser, also.)

So why do I shudder, thinking about Pinkham? Was it because he'd learned to do openly what my father did furtively?

Was it because he didn't swing the way I'd like?

I can't figure it out. Zilber and I were Men of Action, but we both read books.

I didn't have misophonia about mouth-sounds then, like I do now.

It would have been nice if everyone in these different camps was kind to each other, but they weren't. End of story, I guess. It was a good school, this Schuller school, but it was a little weird.

* also with Alex Adrian

*** https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBlCQbAAk7g I think this is the great piece I heard, but I have to confirm. It doesn't sound as I remember.

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Old 7th March 2016, 08:05 PM   #248
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There's a simple answer to the above post, which I'll put in the mouth of Quaker Case. She cause no misophonia.

Quaker puts down her Irish harp and gives her little dog a kick in the ass:

Quaker: It's simple.

Quaker: You, your father, and Daniel Pinkham were indulging yourselves rather than really trying to teach with any discipline.

Me: My God, Quaker, you're right!

Quaker: Here's where it gets more complicated: So were those other guys you mentioned -- what were their names? Oh, yeah: McKinley, Ran , Miraslav, Jaki Byard, George Russell, Joe Maneri. Also crappy teachers.

Me: You're worth every penny.

Quaker: But how that played out depended on something else, not just their pedagogical skills. That will be sixty-five dollars, please. Just make the check payable to me.

Me: But Quaker! Wait.

Quaker: Mike shouldn't have been rude like that. You're essentially trying to protect your father from the students who drew dicks on the blackboard in his class at Penn State. But Mike had a right to be angry. You paid a lot of money at NEC, and the classes were often just crap.


Me: (Bursts into song)

Quaker, you're a fine girl,
What a good wife you would be
But my life, my love and my lady is Lili.



Quaker: I have the name of a psychopharmacologist. He's a little bit odd, but he's ok. and here's an emergency number should I be out of town. Can you remember? 9.1.1.

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Old 7th March 2016, 08:08 PM   #249
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www.youtube.com/watch?v=39Z80oHUZOw

Last edited by calebprime; 7th March 2016 at 08:22 PM.
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Old 7th March 2016, 11:12 PM   #250
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Kate in All Her Glory -- for Varwoche

I forget what town we were in, but I was leaning back against a tree, preparing to have a little smoke.

I couldn't have planned a better view if I'd tried.

Through a big second-story window, maybe 40, 50 feet away, came Kate in all her glory. In no hurry, maybe smiling, about to descend on her lover, my old friend. Not at all bad for a woman in her 30's.

I was transfixed, but not aroused. I knew these nice ladies had no use for a man. Fish and bicycles, and all that.

I didn't look away, and I didn't stare. There was that pipe to attend to.

Many years later, I was flattered when Kate called. She wanted to take my parabolic (a nice Big Ears, yellow) to the rain forests in Panama.

http://george.loper.org/trends/2003/Jul/998.html

I said she could use it for free if she bought a case so it wouldn't break, and if she'd let me train her on it for a minute or two.

Kate is great. She does all kinds of things I can't do, including bedding a certain woman, as above. She travels all over the world, jumps into volcanoes, does the moon walk on ice floes.

I thought, fine. She'll go to Panama, get some great audio, and when she comes back I can clean it up for her, and I can maybe use it myself in some kind of sound collage.

I had done scoring for Kate, and she said she liked my work more than Randy's. (Randy, he's a fine dude.) She always worked me to the point of complete exhaustion, which I rather enjoyed. She wanted something with a little bit of personality, with a little bit of struggle. I'd always check in with her as I worked, so she wouldn't worry.

She came back from Panama with pretty much crap for audio. Even after I'd worked on it, it mostly didn't sound like much.

Here's maybe the best clip, of some howler monkeys.
I ran Izotope Rx on it.

https://app.box.com/s/k8vdjentzwg0t76k8qevt51umuiodejv

In a way, I realized, I should be proud. It's not as easy as you might think to get good audio with a parabolic. You have to adjust for wind, hold it steady, get the right levels, be very quiet, record long enough, remember to bring enough batteries. For starters.

So I was feeling a little smug about old Kate. Yep, I knew what I was doing, and she was just a producer.

Then, a few months later, I ran into her at Jamaica Pond, and she told me a story about how the installation was going in Panama. She'd just put in the music, and it was great.

It was by this guy named Danilo Perez. Maybe you've heard of him.

This is what particularly irked me. Danilo had strung her along, apparently doing nothing on the project 'til a few days before the drop-deadline. Kate was very worried.

She calls him up in anger and frustration. Sure, come over he says.

When she gets there, he gives her some wine. Here, relax, come into the studio. I just wrote this last night.

It was perfect. I think it was around a half-hour of music.

Life isn't fair.


Here's my best achievement with a parabolic. Maybe 100 yards away, out my window. It forms the beginning of my famous piece, Drunk Again This Morning. This won a Grammy and The Rome Prize.

https://app.box.com/s/kh2sc8s4thgn3f29mbw2

There were a couple of Irish roofers doing their thing on the roof of one of my neighbors at the end of the street.

The violin is from another neighbor's house, where she was staying as a guest.

Here's the dialog:

--- Paddy says nothin' but drunk again this mornin'.

--- Huh?

--- Paddy says to me: 'v you met the, eh, that drunk old lady sez definitely drunk again this mornin'.

-- Who you talkin'...Dook...

-- Dooky

Violin plays in neighbor's house. Heh, imperfect pitch. I guessed B,D. Is C,Eb.

My wife is heard stripping off the wallpaper, while I practice 36-pitch 11-limit JI, (sounds like DX7's) My son. Birds. The Boston Marathon.

Drunk again this morning.

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Old 8th March 2016, 05:04 AM   #251
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Show Me What You Got

In my second year, I was flattered when Lee Hyla took a minute to go over the incoming composition students who would be in my class. He was actually speaking to me!

""BG"* is a pretty serious guy. Maybe you heard about that van accident with the music students? His was in the car."

BG immediately shows me a little 'tude. Arrives late, rolls his eyes a little at how improvised the class is. He always has an air of some dignity mixed with surprise at how shoddy everything around him is.

His music, on the Monday night student composer's concert -- a short piece for string quartet featuring a lot of chords in 4ths (sus chords) -- didn't impress me much. Not great, not bad, by student standards. It was at least clear enough, simple enough, and something he liked. That last is actually hard for some student composers.

I always encouraged my students to give me some of their music at the beginning, so I knew who I was teaching.

For some reason I can't remember, to BG I said in class: "Show me what you got." He took it as some sly and insulting way of challenging him, as if I were asking him to drop his pants.

The students were supposed to do their work on DAT tape, which required a continuous time-code to work right, which you could easily create if you didn't try to record past the point of the last time code. Not too hard, you just overlapped your recordings slightly. If you didn't, the tape wouldn't even wind the same way, and if the time code stopped, there was no way for the poor instructor to know if there was another piece on the tape.

So I always insisted that their work had to have continuous time code, and that they give me a list of pieces. Otherwise, I'd waste hours hunting around on blank tape, listening to silence.

Well, long and short of it. I don't remember the specifics any more, but I tried to listen to his tape, and I found some pieces, and there weren't that many, and they weren't all that good.

But Jeremy "Jay" Flower said, maybe next year. "BG did great work! He was writing electronic pieces all the time!"

Ok, but where were they? Did I miss them? Was it my fault, or was it BG's?

I think I gave him a B.

All I know is that he came up to me in the parking lot the last time I saw him, and asked me a technical question, but he was pretty angry at me.

I wasn't trying that hard, and neither was he.






* Completely made-up name

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Old 8th March 2016, 10:22 PM   #252
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Hey, Dodge

I'm posting the source code as we go. This is my right and prerogative as funder, as money bags, as Mr. Daddy Warbucks.

But if you gotta problem wit' dat...you got a problem wi dat? Maybe I don't do that. Maybe I do. I'm capricious, like the wind.

Then I'm posting the output of the first search with the parameters set to find the Clinger list of 65 scales. In each case where a note-string makes little sense, has no advantage, etc., I've crossed it out. The forum tools here make that easier than when using TextEdit. Or, if there's one output string that is fine and it's worse than worthless to have all the rest, I've highlited it in yellow.

I've also added a Seinfeld meh where my preference is weak.

I've done enough of the list to maybe give you enough examples.

Let me know if you need more.

There is actually a serious intellectual problem here, or two. How a musician with some experience but only average logical chops talks to a programmer with no experience but superior logical chops.

And, how to adapt a traditional musical notation to a non-traditional situation.
I don't find such problems very interesting, I only want good-enough.
But good-enough is a little hard to nail down.

I do best with examples. If I try too hard to define the rules myself, I mislead the poor programmer.

Two spoilers, the program so far, and the output.

; okay to change these

(define modulus 24)
(define length-min 7) ; minimum number of notes in scale
(define length-max 7) ; maximum number of notes in scale
(define wolves '(13 15)) ; wolf intervals
(define wolf-max 2) ; this many wolves are ok, but no more
(define distance-3-min 6) ; minimum difference between the lowest and highest notes
; of any 3 consecutive notes in scale
(define bad-notes '(1 13 15 23)) ; never use these notes

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;;
; don't change stuff below

(define (display-2-12 s)
(let recur ((s s)
(b #t))
(when (pair? s)
(cond
((< (car s) 12) (display (car s)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #t))
(b (display "| ") (recur s #f))
(else (display (- (car s) 12)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #f))))))

(define (display-scale s)
(display s) (newline)
(when (= modulus 24)
(display-2-12 s) (newline)
(for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings s)))
(newline))

(define scales '())

(define (found! scale)
(let ((s (reverse scale)))
(set! scales (cons s scales))
(display-scale s)))

; A note is represented as a nonnegative integer less than modulus.
; A scale is represented as a list of notes.

; notes is a list of allowable notes
; n-len is the length of notes
; scale is the scale so far
; s-len is the length of scale
; wolf is the number of wolf intervals in scale
; micro is the number of odd notes in scale (min needed is 1, if modulus is 24)

; call found! for every scale that follows the rules and
; that can be made by adding to 'scale' any number (> 0)
; of notes from 'notes'
(define (find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (not (null? notes))
(< s-len length-max)
(>= (+ s-len n-len) length-min))
(let ((n (car notes))
(notes (cdr notes))
(n-len (- n-len 1)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (> n (+ 1 (car scale)))
(far-enough-a? n scale s-len))
(let ((wolf (+ wolf (count-wolves n scale))))
(when (<= wolf wolf-max)
(let ((micro (+ micro (if (odd? n) 1 0)))
(scale (cons n scale))
(s-len (+ 1 s-len)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (>= s-len length-min)
(if (= modulus 24) (>= micro 1) #t)
(far-enough-b? scale s-len))
(found! scale)))))))))

(define (far-enough-a? n scale len)
(or (<= len 1)
(and (>= (- n (cadr scale)) distance-3-min)
(>= (+ modulus (- (list-ref scale (- len 2)) n)) distance-3-min))))

(define (far-enough-b? scale len)
(or (<= len 1)
(>= (- modulus (cadr scale)) distance-3-min)))

(define (count-wolves n scale)
(fold-left (lambda (sum note)
(let ((interval (- n note)))
(+ sum
(if (member interval wolves) 1 0)
(if (member (- modulus interval) wolves) 1 0))))
0 scale))


(define note-names
'#(("A" ) ; 0
("A+" "A#-" "Bb-") ; 1
("A#" "Bb" ) ; 2
("A#+" "Bb+" "B-" ) ; 3
("B" ) ; 4
("B+" "C-" ) ; 5
("C" ) ; 6
("C+" "C#-" "Db-") ; 7
("C#" "Db" ) ; 8
("C#+" "Db+" "D-" ) ; 9
("D" ) ; 10
("D+" "D#-" "Eb-") ; 11
("D#" "Eb" ) ; 12
("D#+" "Eb+" "E-" ) ; 13
("E" ) ; 14
("E+" "F-" ) ; 15
("F" ) ; 16
("F+" "F#-" "Gb-") ; 17
("F#" "Gb" ) ; 18
("F#+" "Gb+" "G-" ) ; 19
("G" ) ; 20
("G+" "G#-" "Ab-") ; 21
("G#" "Ab" ) ; 22
("G#+" "Ab+" "A-" ) ; 23
))

; A name code represents, e.g., F#+, as
; a list of three numbers, one for the F,
; one for the # and one for the +.
;
; first number: A through G are 0 through 6, respectively.
; second number: b is -1, # is +1, none is 0.
; third number: - is -1, + is +1, none is 0.

(define code-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 1)
(#\C . 2)
(#\D . 3)
(#\E . 4)
(#\F . 5)
(#\G . 6)))

; assumes name is properly capitalized
; i.e., first letter is capital, rest aren't
(define (name->code name)
(let ((lst (string->list name)))
(let ((letter (car lst))
(accidentals (cdr lst)))
(list
(cdr (assoc letter code-values))
(cond
((member #\b accidentals) -1)
((member #\# accidentals) +1)
(else 0))
(cond
((member #\- accidentals) -1)
((member #\+ accidentals) +1)
(else 0))))))

(define (code->name code)
(let ((x (car code))
(y (cadr code))
(z (caddr code)))
(string-append
(string (car (list-ref code-values x)))
(case y
((-1) "b")
((+1) "#")
(else ""))
(case z
((-1) "-")
((+1) "+")
(else "")))))

; same structure as note-names, i.e. vector of lists,
; except with each name replaced by the corresponding code
(define name-codes
(vector-map (lambda (name-list) (map name->code name-list))
note-names))

(define note-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 4)
(#\C . 6)
(#\D . 10)
(#\E . 14)
(#\F . 16)
(#\G . 20)
(#\# . 2)
(#\b . -2)
(#\+ . 1)
(#\- . -1)))

(define (cross-product . x)
(if (null? x)
'(())
(apply append
(map (lambda (a)
(map (lambda (b) (cons a b))
(apply cross-product (cdr x))))
(car x)))))

; measures the extent to which letters are repeated
; lower is better
(define (repetitiveness x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 7 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c)
(let ((n (car c)))
(vector-set! v n (+ 1 (vector-ref v n)))))
x)
(apply + (map (lambda (x) (* x x))
(vector->list v)))))

; returns list of those items x of lst
; for which (f x) is least
(define (min-scorers f lst)
(let* ((scored-lst (map (lambda (x) (cons (f x) x))
lst))
(ms (fold-left (lambda (a x) (min a (car x)))
(caar scored-lst) (cdr scored-lst))))
(map cdr
(filter (lambda (x) (equal? (car x) ms))
scored-lst))))

(define (best-spellings scale)
(let* ((all-spellings (apply cross-product
(map (lambda (n) (vector-ref name-codes n))
scale)))
(best-scales (min-scorers repetitiveness all-spellings)))
(map (lambda (scale) (map code->name scale))
best-scales)))

(define (go)
(set! scales '())
(let ((allowed-notes (remp (lambda (n) (member n bad-notes))
(cdr (iota modulus)))))
(find-scales allowed-notes (length allowed-notes) '(0) 1 0 0)
(newline)
(display (length scales))
(display " scales found")))

(go)


> (load "Desktop/microtonal-2.txt")
(0 5 10 12 16 18 22)
0 5 10 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ D Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- D Eb F F# G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb Ab)

(0 5 8 12 16 18 22)
0 5 8 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ C# D# F F# G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb Ab)
(A B+ C# Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb Ab)
(A B+ Db Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- Db Eb F F# G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb Ab)

(0 5 8 12 14 18 22)
0 5 8 | 0 2 6 10
(A B+ C# D# E F# G#)

(0 5 7 11 14 17 21)
0 5 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 4 8 12 14 18 21)
0 4 8 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C# D# E F# G+) ........comment: meh, either one ok
(A B C# D# E F# G#-)

(0 4 8 11 16 18 22)
0 4 8 11 | 4 6 10
(A B C# D+ F F# G#)
(A B C# D+ F Gb G#)
(A B C# D+ F Gb Ab)
(A B C# D#- F F# G#)
(A B C# D#- F Gb G#)
(A B C# D#- F Gb Ab)
(A B C# Eb- F F# G#)
(A B C# Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B C# Eb- F Gb Ab)
(A B Db Eb- F F# G#)
(A B Db Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B Db Eb- F Gb Ab)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 22)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 10
(A B C# D+ E F# G#) meh, either
(A B C# D#- E F# G#)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 21)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C# D+ E F# G+)
(A B C# D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C# D#- E F# G+)
(A B C# D#- E F# G#-)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 20)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 8
(A B C# D+ E F# G)
(A B C# D#- E F# G) meh

(0 4 8 10 14 18 21)
0 4 8 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C# D E F# G+) either
(A B C# D E F# G#-)

(0 4 8 10 14 17 22)
0 4 8 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C# D E F+ G#) either
(A B C# D E F#- G#)

(0 4 8 10 14 17 20)
0 4 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C# D E F+ G)
(A B C# D E F#- G) either

(0 4 8 10 14 16 21)
0 4 8 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C# D E F G+) either
(A B C# D E F G#-)

(0 4 7 12 14 18 22)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 10
(A B C+ D# E F# G#)
(A B C#- D# E F# G#) meh

(0 4 7 12 14 18 21)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C+ D# E F# G+)
(A B C+ D# E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D# E F# G+)
(A B C#- D# E F# G#-)

(0 4 7 12 14 18 20)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 8
(A B C+ D# E F# G)
(A B C#- D# E F# G)

(0 4 7 11 14 18 21)
0 4 7 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C+ D+ E F# G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F# G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F# G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F# G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F# G#-)

(0 4 7 11 14 17 21)
0 4 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A B C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 10
(A B C+ D E F# G#)
(A B C#- D E F# G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C+ D E F# G+)
(A B C+ D E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D E F# G+)
(A B C#- D E F# G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 8
(A B C+ D E F# G)
(A B C#- D E F# G)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C+ D E F+ G#)
(A B C+ D E F#- G#)
(A B C#- D E F+ G#)
(A B C#- D E F#- G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 9
(A B C+ D E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D E F#- G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C+ D E F+ G)
(A B C+ D E F#- G)
(A B C#- D E F+ G)
(A B C#- D E F#- G)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 10
(A B C+ D E F G#)
(A B C#- D E F G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C+ D E F G+)
(A B C+ D E F G#-)
(A B C#- D E F G+)
(A B C#- D E F G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 8
(A B C+ D E F G)
(A B C#- D E F G)

(0 4 6 12 14 18 21)
0 4 6 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C D# E F# G+)
(A B C D# E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 11 16 18 22)
0 4 6 11 | 4 6 10
(A B C D+ F F# G#)
(A B C D+ F Gb G#)
(A B C D+ F Gb Ab)
(A B C D#- F F# G#)
(A B C D#- F Gb G#)
(A B C D#- F Gb Ab)
(A B C Eb- F F# G#)
(A B C Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B C Eb- F Gb Ab)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 22)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 10
(A B C D+ E F# G#)
(A B C D#- E F# G#)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 21)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C D+ E F# G+)
(A B C D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C D#- E F# G+)
(A B C D#- E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 20)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 8
(A B C D+ E F# G)
(A B C D#- E F# G)

(0 4 6 10 14 18 21)
0 4 6 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C D E F# G+)
(A B C D E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 10 14 17 22)
0 4 6 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C D E F+ G#)
(A B C D E F#- G#)

(0 4 6 10 14 17 20)
0 4 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C D E F+ G)
(A B C D E F#- G)

(0 4 6 10 14 16 21)
0 4 6 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C D E F G+)
(A B C D E F G#-)

(0 4 6 10 12 17 22)
0 4 6 10 | 0 5 10
(A B C D Eb F+ G#)
(A B C D Eb F#- G#)

(0 4 6 10 12 17 20)
0 4 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A B C D Eb F+ G)
(A B C D Eb F#- G)

(0 3 8 10 14 18 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F# G)
(A B- C# D E F# G)

(0 3 8 10 14 17 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C# D E F#- G)
(A B- C# D E F+ G)
(A B- C# D E F#- G)

(0 3 8 10 14 16 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F G)
(A B- C# D E F G)

(0 3 7 11 14 17 21)
0 3 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 3 7 10 14 17 21)
0 3 7 10 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G#-)

(0 3 7 10 14 17 20)
0 3 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G)

(0 3 7 9 14 17 21)
0 3 7 9 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D- E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D- E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D- E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D- E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D- E F#- G#-)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F+ G+)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F#- G+)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F#- G#-)

(0 3 6 10 14 18 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb+ C D E F# G)
(A B- C D E F# G)

(0 3 6 10 14 17 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C D E F#- G)
(A B- C D E F+ G)
(A B- C D E F#- G)

(0 3 6 10 14 16 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb+ C D E F G)
(A B- C D E F G)

(0 3 6 10 12 18 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 6 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F# G)
(A B- C D Eb F# G)

(0 3 6 10 12 17 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F+ G)
(A Bb+ C D Eb F#- G)
(A B- C D Eb F+ G)
(A B- C D Eb F#- G)

(0 3 6 10 12 16 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 4 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F G)
(A B- C D Eb F G)

(0 2 8 10 14 17 20)
0 2 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C# D E F+ G)
(A Bb C# D E F#- G)

(0 2 7 12 14 18 20)
0 2 7 | 0 2 6 8
(A Bb C+ D# E F# G)
(A Bb C#- D# E F# G)

(0 2 7 10 14 18 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb C+ D E F# G)
(A Bb C#- D E F# G)

(0 2 7 10 14 17 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C+ D E F+ G)
(A Bb C+ D E F#- G)
(A Bb C#- D E F+ G)
(A Bb C#- D E F#- G)

(0 2 7 10 14 16 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb C+ D E F G)
(A Bb C#- D E F G)

(0 2 6 10 14 17 20)
0 2 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C D E F+ G)
(A Bb C D E F#- G)

(0 2 6 10 12 17 20)
0 2 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A Bb C D Eb F+ G)
(A Bb C D Eb F#- G)

(0 2 6 10 12 16 19)
0 2 6 10 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C D Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C D Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 9 14 16 20)
0 2 6 9 | 2 4 8
(A Bb C Db+ E F G)
(A Bb C D- E F G)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 20)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 8
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F G)
(A Bb C D- Eb F G)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 19)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F G-)
(A Bb C D- Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C D- Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 18)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 6
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F Gb)
(A Bb C D- Eb F Gb)

(0 2 6 8 12 16 19)
0 2 6 8 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C Db Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C Db Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 8 12 14 19)
0 2 6 8 | 0 2 7
(A Bb C C# D# E F#+)
(A Bb C C# D# E Gb+)
(A Bb C C# D# E G-)
(A Bb C Db D# E F#+)
(A Bb C Db D# E Gb+)
(A Bb C Db D# E G-)
(A Bb C Db Eb E F#+)
(A Bb C Db Eb E Gb+)
(A Bb C Db Eb E G-)


65 scales found


Und now, some delicious and addicting coffee. Yay!

Last edited by calebprime; 8th March 2016 at 10:27 PM.
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Old 9th March 2016, 12:19 AM   #253
calebprime
Somewhat Elitist Parasite
 
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,495
Oh, I gotta have sumpin' up here, too.


Originally Posted by calebprime View Post

Observe: Dig: Grok: Viddy Well, O my brother:


> (load "Desktop/microtonal-2.txt")
(0 5 10 12 16 18 22)
0 5 10 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ D Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- D Eb F F# G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb Ab)

These all resemble subsets of an oct. scale, so they won't spell right anyway.
Best to avoid weird dupe letters -- Gb, G#


(0 5 8 12 16 18 22)
0 5 8 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ C# D# F F# G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb Ab)
(A B+ C# Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb Ab)
(A B+ Db Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- Db Eb F F# G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb Ab)


I like this last one, because it resembles the best
enharmonic spelling of a Db harmonic major scale.

"Correct" spelling -- old-school -- would be:

Db,Eb,F,Gb,Ab,Bbb (B double flat, which is horrible!) ,C

much better louche jazzbo flatland spelling:

Db,Eb,F,Gb,Ab,A,C, or in sharps:

C#,D#,E#,F#,G#,A,B#,

but the E# and the B# are pointless tartuffery, so

C#,D#,F,F#,G#,A,C is better if you will, but you won't, so flats,

unless the overall context was sharps.

Heh.



(0 5 8 12 14 18 22)
0 5 8 | 0 2 6 10
(A B+ C# D# E F# G#)

(0 5 7 11 14 17 21)
0 5 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G#-) like E harm. major, man.
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 4 8 12 14 18 21)
0 4 8 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C# D# E F# G+) ........comment: meh, either one ok
(A B C# D# E F# G#-)

resembles E major. The key of the people, but not the mode of the people
The mode of the people is actually Mixolydian. Think every song by The Who or The Dead.

Sort of an Unknown (who) Soldier (dead) thing going on here.

(0 4 8 11 16 18 22)
0 4 8 11 | 4 6 10
(A B C# D+ F F# G#)
(A B C# D+ F Gb G#)
(A B C# D+ F Gb Ab)
(A B C# D#- F F# G#) Resembles enharm sp. of F# mel min up
(A B C# D#- F Gb G#)
(A B C# D#- F Gb Ab)
(A B C# Eb- F F# G#)
(A B C# Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B C# Eb- F Gb Ab)
(A B Db Eb- F F# G#)
(A B Db Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B Db Eb- F Gb Ab)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 22)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 10
(A B C# D+ E F# G#) meh, either
(A B C# D#- E F# G#)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 21)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C# D+ E F# G+)
(A B C# D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C# D#- E F# G+)
(A B C# D#- E F# G#-)

good ol' E major, again (E Ionian)

(0 4 8 11 14 18 20)
0 4 8 11 | 2 6 8
(A B C# D+ E F# G)
(A B C# D#- E F# G) meh

(0 4 8 10 14 18 21)
0 4 8 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C# D E F# G+) either
(A B C# D E F# G#-)

(0 4 8 10 14 17 22)
0 4 8 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C# D E F+ G#) either
(A B C# D E F#- G#)

(0 4 8 10 14 17 20)
0 4 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C# D E F+ G)
(A B C# D E F#- G) either

(0 4 8 10 14 16 21)
0 4 8 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C# D E F G+) either
(A B C# D E F G#-)

(0 4 7 12 14 18 22)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 10
(A B C+ D# E F# G#)
(A B C#- D# E F# G#) meh

same old samo basquiat

(0 4 7 12 14 18 21)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C+ D# E F# G+)
(A B C+ D# E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D# E F# G+)
(A B C#- D# E F# G#-)

Again with the E.

oh, checking my memory here, random note:

lessee: White Mass plate 3 Ed 378, not sure about the 3 in 378.
Hannibal Lecter I am not.



(0 4 7 12 14 18 20)
0 4 7 | 0 2 6 8
(A B C+ D# E F# G)
(A B C#- D# E F# G)

for naming, it could be any of 7, but I look for something like
a fifth (7 steps) (3/2 ratio) above the starting point.

E melodic minor, A lydian b7, all good


(0 4 7 11 14 18 21)
0 4 7 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C+ D+ E F# G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F# G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F# G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F# G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F# G#-)

any more E and I'll start to go EEEEE, like I just stepped into frozen pond.


Any more examples I should look at?

(0 4 7 11 14 17 21)
0 4 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A B C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 10
(A B C+ D E F# G#)
(A B C#- D E F# G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C+ D E F# G+)
(A B C+ D E F# G#-)
(A B C#- D E F# G+)
(A B C#- D E F# G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 18 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 6 8
(A B C+ D E F# G)
(A B C#- D E F# G)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C+ D E F+ G#)
(A B C+ D E F#- G#)
(A B C#- D E F+ G#)
(A B C#- D E F#- G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 9
(A B C+ D E F+ G+)
(A B C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A B C+ D E F#- G+)
(A B C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A B C#- D E F+ G+)
(A B C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A B C#- D E F#- G+)
(A B C#- D E F#- G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 17 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C+ D E F+ G)
(A B C+ D E F#- G)
(A B C#- D E F+ G)
(A B C#- D E F#- G)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 22)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 10
(A B C+ D E F G#)
(A B C#- D E F G#)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 21)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C+ D E F G+)
(A B C+ D E F G#-)
(A B C#- D E F G+)
(A B C#- D E F G#-)

(0 4 7 10 14 16 20)
0 4 7 10 | 2 4 8
(A B C+ D E F G)
(A B C#- D E F G)

(0 4 6 12 14 18 21)
0 4 6 | 0 2 6 9
(A B C D# E F# G+)
(A B C D# E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 11 16 18 22)
0 4 6 11 | 4 6 10
(A B C D+ F F# G#)
(A B C D+ F Gb G#)
(A B C D+ F Gb Ab)
(A B C D#- F F# G#)
(A B C D#- F Gb G#)
(A B C D#- F Gb Ab)
(A B C Eb- F F# G#)
(A B C Eb- F Gb G#)
(A B C Eb- F Gb Ab)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 22)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 10
(A B C D+ E F# G#)
(A B C D#- E F# G#)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 21)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 9
(A B C D+ E F# G+)
(A B C D+ E F# G#-)
(A B C D#- E F# G+)
(A B C D#- E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 11 14 18 20)
0 4 6 11 | 2 6 8
(A B C D+ E F# G)
(A B C D#- E F# G)

(0 4 6 10 14 18 21)
0 4 6 10 | 2 6 9
(A B C D E F# G+)
(A B C D E F# G#-)

(0 4 6 10 14 17 22)
0 4 6 10 | 2 5 10
(A B C D E F+ G#)
(A B C D E F#- G#)

(0 4 6 10 14 17 20)
0 4 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A B C D E F+ G)
(A B C D E F#- G)

(0 4 6 10 14 16 21)
0 4 6 10 | 2 4 9
(A B C D E F G+)
(A B C D E F G#-)

(0 4 6 10 12 17 22)
0 4 6 10 | 0 5 10
(A B C D Eb F+ G#)
(A B C D Eb F#- G#)

(0 4 6 10 12 17 20)
0 4 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A B C D Eb F+ G)
(A B C D Eb F#- G)

(0 3 8 10 14 18 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F# G)
(A B- C# D E F# G)

(0 3 8 10 14 17 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C# D E F#- G)
(A B- C# D E F+ G)
(A B- C# D E F#- G)

(0 3 8 10 14 16 20)
0 3 8 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb+ C# D E F G)
(A B- C# D E F G)

(0 3 7 11 14 17 21)
0 3 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

(0 3 7 10 14 17 21)
0 3 7 10 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G#-)

(0 3 7 10 14 17 20)
0 3 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C+ D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C+ D E F#- G)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C#- D E F#- G)
(A B- C+ D E F+ G)
(A B- C+ D E F#- G)
(A B- C#- D E F+ G)
(A B- C#- D E F#- G)

(0 3 7 9 14 17 21)
0 3 7 9 | 2 5 9
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C+ D- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ C#- D- E F#- G#-)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F+ G+)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F+ G#-)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F#- G+)
(A Bb+ Db- C#+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C+ D- E F+ G+)
(A B- C+ D- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C+ D- E F#- G+)
(A B- C+ D- E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- Db+ E F#- G#-)
(A B- C#- D- E F+ G+)
(A B- C#- D- E F+ G#-)
(A B- C#- D- E F#- G+)
(A B- C#- D- E F#- G#-)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F+ G+)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F+ G#-)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F#- G+)
(A B- Db- C#+ E F#- G#-)

(0 3 6 10 14 18 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb+ C D E F# G)
(A B- C D E F# G)

(0 3 6 10 14 17 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb+ C D E F+ G)
(A Bb+ C D E F#- G)
(A B- C D E F+ G)
(A B- C D E F#- G)

(0 3 6 10 14 16 20)
0 3 6 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb+ C D E F G)
(A B- C D E F G)

(0 3 6 10 12 18 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 6 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F# G)
(A B- C D Eb F# G)

(0 3 6 10 12 17 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F+ G)
(A Bb+ C D Eb F#- G)
(A B- C D Eb F+ G)
(A B- C D Eb F#- G)

(0 3 6 10 12 16 20)
0 3 6 10 | 0 4 8
(A Bb+ C D Eb F G)
(A B- C D Eb F G)

(0 2 8 10 14 17 20)
0 2 8 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C# D E F+ G)
(A Bb C# D E F#- G)

(0 2 7 12 14 18 20)
0 2 7 | 0 2 6 8
(A Bb C+ D# E F# G)
(A Bb C#- D# E F# G)

(0 2 7 10 14 18 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 6 8
(A Bb C+ D E F# G)
(A Bb C#- D E F# G)

(0 2 7 10 14 17 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C+ D E F+ G)
(A Bb C+ D E F#- G)
(A Bb C#- D E F+ G)
(A Bb C#- D E F#- G)

(0 2 7 10 14 16 20)
0 2 7 10 | 2 4 8
(A Bb C+ D E F G)
(A Bb C#- D E F G)

(0 2 6 10 14 17 20)
0 2 6 10 | 2 5 8
(A Bb C D E F+ G)
(A Bb C D E F#- G)

(0 2 6 10 12 17 20)
0 2 6 10 | 0 5 8
(A Bb C D Eb F+ G)
(A Bb C D Eb F#- G)

(0 2 6 10 12 16 19)
0 2 6 10 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C D Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C D Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 9 14 16 20)
0 2 6 9 | 2 4 8
(A Bb C Db+ E F G)
(A Bb C D- E F G)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 20)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 8
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F G)
(A Bb C D- Eb F G)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 19)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F G-)
(A Bb C D- Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C D- Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 9 12 16 18)
0 2 6 9 | 0 4 6
(A Bb C Db+ Eb F Gb)
(A Bb C D- Eb F Gb)

(0 2 6 8 12 16 19)
0 2 6 8 | 0 4 7
(A Bb C Db Eb F Gb+)
(A Bb C Db Eb F G-)

(0 2 6 8 12 14 19)
0 2 6 8 | 0 2 7
(A Bb C C# D# E F#+)
(A Bb C C# D# E Gb+)
(A Bb C C# D# E G-)
(A Bb C Db D# E F#+)
(A Bb C Db D# E Gb+)
(A Bb C Db D# E G-)
(A Bb C Db Eb E F#+)
(A Bb C Db Eb E Gb+)
(A Bb C Db Eb E G-)


65 scales found


Und now, some delicious and addicting coffee. Yay!
There comes a time in every man's life when he just has to jump up and down, pointlessly, lest he develop phlebitis or rabies.

Got any rabies, baby?
Want some more?

Last edited by calebprime; 9th March 2016 at 12:23 AM.
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Old 9th March 2016, 12:32 AM   #254
calebprime
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Posts: 11,495
intervals.

interval training of the severest, most erotic most sexy-making time


; okay to change these

(define modulus 24)
(define length-min 7) ; minimum number of notes in scale
(define length-max 7) ; maximum number of notes in scale
(define wolves '(13 15)) ; wolf intervals
(define wolf-max 2) ; this many wolves are ok, but no more
(define distance-3-min 6) ; minimum difference between the lowest and highest notes
; of any 3 consecutive notes in scale
(define bad-notes '(1 13 15 23)) ; never use these notes

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;;
; don't change stuff below

; A note is represented as a nonnegative integer less than modulus.
; A scale is represented as a list of notes.

(define (interval a b)
(modulo (- b a) modulus))

(define (notes->intervals ns)
(if (null? ns)
'()
(let ((first (car ns)))
(let recur ((n first)
(rest (cdr ns)))
(if (null? rest)
(list (interval n first))
(cons (interval n (car rest))
(recur (car rest) (cdr rest))))))))

(define (display-2-12 s)
(let recur ((s s)
(b #t))
(when (pair? s)
(cond
((< (car s) 12) (display (car s)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #t))
(b (display "| ") (recur s #f))
(else (display (- (car s) 12)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #f))))))

(define (display-scale s)
(display "notes: ")
(display s)
(newline)
(display "intervals: ")
(let ((x (notes->intervals s)))
(display (append x x)))
(newline)
(when (= modulus 24)
(display-2-12 s) (newline)
(for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings s)))
(newline))

(define scales '())

(define (found! scale)
(let ((s (reverse scale)))
(set! scales (cons s scales))
(display-scale s)))


; notes is a list of allowable notes
; n-len is the length of notes
; scale is the scale so far
; s-len is the length of scale
; wolf is the number of wolf intervals in scale
; micro is the number of odd notes in scale (min needed is 1, if modulus is 24)

; call found! for every scale that follows the rules and
; that can be made by adding to 'scale' any number (> 0)
; of notes from 'notes'
(define (find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (not (null? notes))
(< s-len length-max)
(>= (+ s-len n-len) length-min))
(let ((n (car notes))
(notes (cdr notes))
(n-len (- n-len 1)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (> n (+ 1 (car scale)))
(far-enough-a? n scale s-len))
(let ((wolf (+ wolf (count-wolves n scale))))
(when (<= wolf wolf-max)
(let ((micro (+ micro (if (odd? n) 1 0)))
(scale (cons n scale))
(s-len (+ 1 s-len)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (>= s-len length-min)
(if (= modulus 24) (>= micro 1) #t)
(far-enough-b? scale s-len))
(found! scale)))))))))

(define (far-enough-a? n scale len)
(or (<= len 1)
(and (>= (- n (cadr scale)) distance-3-min)
(>= (+ modulus (- (list-ref scale (- len 2)) n)) distance-3-min))))

(define (far-enough-b? scale len)
(or (<= len 1)
(>= (- modulus (cadr scale)) distance-3-min)))

(define (count-wolves n scale)
(fold-left (lambda (sum note)
(let ((interval (- n note)))
(+ sum
(if (member interval wolves) 1 0)
(if (member (- modulus interval) wolves) 1 0))))
0 scale))


(define note-names
'#(("A" ) ; 0
("A+" "A#-" "Bb-") ; 1
("A#" "Bb" ) ; 2
("A#+" "Bb+" "B-" ) ; 3
("B" ) ; 4
("B+" "C-" ) ; 5
("C" ) ; 6
("C+" "C#-" "Db-") ; 7
("C#" "Db" ) ; 8
("C#+" "Db+" "D-" ) ; 9
("D" ) ; 10
("D+" "D#-" "Eb-") ; 11
("D#" "Eb" ) ; 12
("D#+" "Eb+" "E-" ) ; 13
("E" ) ; 14
("E+" "F-" ) ; 15
("F" ) ; 16
("F+" "F#-" "Gb-") ; 17
("F#" "Gb" ) ; 18
("F#+" "Gb+" "G-" ) ; 19
("G" ) ; 20
("G+" "G#-" "Ab-") ; 21
("G#" "Ab" ) ; 22
("G#+" "Ab+" "A-" ) ; 23
))

; A name code represents, e.g., F#+, as
; a list of three numbers, one for the F,
; one for the # and one for the +.
;
; first number: A through G are 0 through 6, respectively.
; second number: b is -1, # is +1, none is 0.
; third number: - is -1, + is +1, none is 0.

(define code-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 1)
(#\C . 2)
(#\D . 3)
(#\E . 4)
(#\F . 5)
(#\G . 6)))

; assumes name is properly capitalized
; i.e., first letter is capital, rest aren't
(define (name->code name)
(let ((lst (string->list name)))
(let ((letter (car lst))
(accidentals (cdr lst)))
(list
(cdr (assoc letter code-values))
(cond
((member #\b accidentals) -1)
((member #\# accidentals) +1)
(else 0))
(cond
((member #\- accidentals) -1)
((member #\+ accidentals) +1)
(else 0))))))

(define (code->name code)
(let ((x (car code))
(y (cadr code))
(z (caddr code)))
(string-append
(string (car (list-ref code-values x)))
(case y
((-1) "b")
((+1) "#")
(else ""))
(case z
((-1) "-")
((+1) "+")
(else "")))))

; same structure as note-names, i.e. vector of lists,
; except with each name replaced by the corresponding code
(define name-codes
(vector-map (lambda (name-list) (map name->code name-list))
note-names))

(define note-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 4)
(#\C . 6)
(#\D . 10)
(#\E . 14)
(#\F . 16)
(#\G . 20)
(#\# . 2)
(#\b . -2)
(#\+ . 1)
(#\- . -1)))

(define (cross-product . x)
(if (null? x)
'(())
(apply append
(map (lambda (a)
(map (lambda (b) (cons a b))
(apply cross-product (cdr x))))
(car x)))))

; measures the extent to which letters are repeated
; lower is better
(define (repetitiveness x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 7 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c)
(let ((n (car c)))
(vector-set! v n (+ 1 (vector-ref v n)))))
x)
(apply + (map (lambda (x) (* x x))
(vector->list v)))))

; returns list of those items x of lst
; for which (f x) is least
(define (min-scorers f lst)
(let* ((scored-lst (map (lambda (x) (cons (f x) x))
lst))
(ms (fold-left (lambda (a x) (min a (car x)))
(caar scored-lst) (cdr scored-lst))))
(map cdr
(filter (lambda (x) (equal? (car x) ms))
scored-lst))))

(define (best-spellings scale)
(let* ((all-spellings (apply cross-product
(map (lambda (n) (vector-ref name-codes n))
scale)))
(best (min-scorers repetitiveness all-spellings)))
(map (lambda (scale) (map code->name scale))
best)))

(define (go)
(set! scales '())
(let ((allowed-notes (remp (lambda (n) (member n bad-notes))
(cdr (iota modulus)))))
(find-scales allowed-notes (length allowed-notes) '(0) 1 0 0)
(newline)
(display (length scales))
(display " scales found")))

(go)


output:

> (load "Desktop/microtonal-3.txt")
notes: (0 5 10 12 16 18 22)
intervals: (5 5 2 4 2 4 2 5 5 2 4 2 4 2)
0 5 10 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ D Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ D Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- D Eb F F# G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- D Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 5 8 12 16 18 22)
intervals: (5 3 4 4 2 4 2 5 3 4 4 2 4 2)
0 5 8 | 0 4 6 10
(A B+ C# D# F F# G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# D# F Gb Ab)
(A B+ C# Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ C# Eb F Gb Ab)
(A B+ Db Eb F F# G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A B+ Db Eb F Gb Ab)
(A C- Db Eb F F# G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb G#)
(A C- Db Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 5 8 12 14 18 22)
intervals: (5 3 4 2 4 4 2 5 3 4 2 4 4 2)
0 5 8 | 0 2 6 10
(A B+ C# D# E F# G#)

notes: (0 5 7 11 14 17 21)
intervals: (5 2 4 3 3 4 3 5 2 4 3 3 4 3)
0 5 7 11 | 2 5 9
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C+ D#- E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D+ E F#- G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F+ G#-)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G+)
(A B+ C#- D#- E F#- G#-)

notes: (0 4 8 12 14 18 21)
intervals: (4 4 4 2 4 3 3 4 4 4 2 4 3 3)
0 4 8 | 0 2 6 9
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und now we jump and foam at mouth. moouuuuutthhhh.

Sugar Magnolia blossom's blooming
Head's all empty and I don't care
Saw my baby down by the river
Knew she'd have to come up soon for air

Last edited by calebprime; 9th March 2016 at 12:35 AM.
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Old 9th March 2016, 01:01 AM   #255
calebprime
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Officer Bobby:

I offered him one of my two oranges, with the caveat that it was somewhat sweaty.

"No, I'm good."

A pro, and nice-enough. Officer and gentleman.
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Old 9th March 2016, 03:44 AM   #256
calebprime
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Why I love DragonLady, from afar. Way afar.

My mother banded birds, was a fairly serious amateur ornithologist.

She became a local authority, and people would bring her things, like the famous
frozen owl that woke up in the freezer.

I loved to hold the birds, even if they had a nasty bite, like an evening grosbeak, or a blue jay.

Some birds would just play dead, and you could open your hand, and they'd just lie there, for a long time.

I was maybe 7 or 8 when I read a book by Robert Lawson called "There is enough for all." Maybe it was only a story, because I don't see it on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...son%5Cc+robert
It was all so moving! Everyone enjoyed a big banquet!

I came in gushing to Mom: "Mom, there is enough for all! The book said so!"

She had a quick fuse. She slapped me.

"No there isn't. There isn't enough for all."

None of that pathetic Christian treacle, or whatever the book was selling, for her.

Now, I don't advocate slapping your kid, but it's at least better to completely reject sentimentality of that kind.

Plus I have the short fuse. Since I still weigh maybe 230, give or take 15 in any given 2-month period, I can still kill someone by mistake with a good straight right hand that I put my weight into.

So the best thing to do with conflict, and with killer rabbits: Run away! Run away!

That's tuff enuff.

My Mom went to see The Birds, and started laughing, then left early.

Last edited by calebprime; 9th March 2016 at 03:48 AM.
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Old 9th March 2016, 12:39 PM   #257
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Ecclesiastes Beer Ad

Quote:
Are you mad about Kubrick? I like your eyes, I like him, too.
(Voice of Ec. read by Peter Coyote, or by a morphing band of the whole sick crew.)



Everyone's used to mock advertisements, like Saturday Night Live does.

I was reading about Chris Farley, and he'd done a mock ad called Gay Beer.

I was wondering if someone with better comedic chops than me could write something that seemed to be a mock SNL-style ad, using Ecclesiastes, but the twist was that the whole thing really was Ecclesiastes.

Instead of lasting 60 seconds, it would just keep going.

There'd be an audience watching the ads on their TVs at homes, but that would morph over time -- black & white TVs to mobile devices, to (7cj@-implants.

It might evoke the cover of the Grateful Dead Mars Hotel album, also, where the band members look like these mutants, all watching TV. But only in passing.

But it would be different. There would be this slightly maddening hint of a real plot. Somehow one of the "people" watching would start off as some guy, become an Arnold Schwartzenegger Terminator -- but on his internal screens we see that he is some kind of automated psychiatrist, both clinical and "caring" -- as much as he is capable. He alone would remain sort of intact, though he would -- like Terminator -- be sort of stripped of all his flesh. While he's watching the "ad", he would be displaying both clinical judgements of the usual horribly objective sort, but also happy bromides and strategies for making the clients comfortable in a genuinely warm way. So, he'd be sitting there, decaying, watching the ghosts of CGI fat comedians, at first, and displaying their addictions on his red screens, with some good well-researched things to say that are usually effective with such people, to win them over.

The "Beer Ad" would be the usual pool-side party. Maybe through the magic of CGI, all the fat comedians would attend.

Everyone, every single character, would be shown decaying, or experiencing some horrible death, or just dying of boredom and loneliness. It would be detailed enough, and brutally cruel without being hard to watch -- no flashy thingies, no zoomy camera moves, etc.

But no Kubrick-style symmetrical compositions, with a static cam? Well maybe somehow something like that could be part of some nested parody.

In the end, Terminator would have gone through changes, and ended as a 2001-style baby, except not. This baby would sing, beatifully. Opera. Not sure what, but genuinely beautiful, no crying, no "edge", no camp. Mozart?

Maybe the whole thing could pretend to be an SNL special, but turn into a War-of-the-Worlds sort of thing, lasting an hour, but with no ads, no letup, no remorse. Let the lawsuits begin!



So, first we start in the frat house, with the unfilled pool, dirty with leaves, flotsam, old beer cans.

Next, the usual magic transformation, where it comes sparkling to life, and the party begins.

Etc.

And then, somehow, this -- the most beautiful thing ever written. It would just keep going, and going, after the "beer ad" was over.

It probably should be King James. In fact, maybe there could be some Idiocracy-style mocking of the old-fashioned language as part of the action. Not sure.


The ad begins.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Ecclesiastes


1 The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem.

2 Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity.

3 What profit hath a man of all his labour which he taketh under the sun?

4 One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh: but the earth abideth for ever.

5 The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to his place where he arose.

6 The wind goeth toward the south, and turneth about unto the north; it whirleth about continually, and the wind returneth again according to his circuits.

7 All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.

8 All things are full of labour; man cannot utter it: the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing.

9 The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.

10 Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? it hath been already of old time, which was before us.

11 There is no remembrance of former things; neither shall there be any remembrance of things that are to come with those that shall come after.

12 I the Preacher was king over Israel in Jerusalem.

13 And I gave my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven: this sore travail hath God given to the sons of man to be exercised therewith.

14 I have seen all the works that are done under the sun; and, behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit.

15 That which is crooked cannot be made straight: and that which is wanting cannot be numbered.

16 I communed with mine own heart, saying, Lo, I am come to great estate, and have gotten more wisdom than all they that have been before me in Jerusalem: yea, my heart had great experience of wisdom and knowledge.

17 And I gave my heart to know wisdom, and to know madness and folly: I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit.

18 For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

2 I said in mine heart, Go to now, I will prove thee with mirth, therefore enjoy pleasure: and, behold, this also is vanity.

2 I said of laughter, It is mad: and of mirth, What doeth it?

3 I sought in mine heart to give myself unto wine, yet acquainting mine heart with wisdom; and to lay hold on folly, till I might see what was that good for the sons of men, which they should do under the heaven all the days of their life.

4 I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards:

5 I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits:

6 I made me pools of water, to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees:

7 I got me servants and maidens, and had servants born in my house; also I had great possessions of great and small cattle above all that were in Jerusalem before me:

8 I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings and of the provinces: I gat me men singers and women singers, and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts.

9 So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem: also my wisdom remained with me.

10 And whatsoever mine eyes desired I kept not from them, I withheld not my heart from any joy; for my heart rejoiced in all my labour: and this was my portion of all my labour.

11 Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do: and, behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun.

12 And I turned myself to behold wisdom, and madness, and folly: for what can the man do that cometh after the king? even that which hath been already done.

13 Then I saw that wisdom excelleth folly, as far as light excelleth darkness.

14 The wise man's eyes are in his head; but the fool walketh in darkness: and I myself perceived also that one event happeneth to them all.

15 Then said I in my heart, As it happeneth to the fool, so it happeneth even to me; and why was I then more wise? Then I said in my heart, that this also is vanity.

16 For there is no remembrance of the wise more than of the fool for ever; seeing that which now is in the days to come shall all be forgotten. And how dieth the wise man? as the fool.

17 Therefore I hated life; because the work that is wrought under the sun is grievous unto me: for all is vanity and vexation of spirit.

18 Yea, I hated all my labour which I had taken under the sun: because I should leave it unto the man that shall be after me.

19 And who knoweth whether he shall be a wise man or a fool? yet shall he have rule over all my labour wherein I have laboured, and wherein I have shewed myself wise under the sun. This is also vanity.

20 Therefore I went about to cause my heart to despair of all the labour which I took under the sun.

21 For there is a man whose labour is in wisdom, and in knowledge, and in equity; yet to a man that hath not laboured therein shall he leave it for his portion. This also is vanity and a great evil.

22 For what hath man of all his labour, and of the vexation of his heart, wherein he hath laboured under the sun?

23 For all his days are sorrows, and his travail grief; yea, his heart taketh not rest in the night. This is also vanity.

24 There is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labour. This also I saw, that it was from the hand of God.

25 For who can eat, or who else can hasten hereunto, more than I?

26 For God giveth to a man that is good in his sight wisdom, and knowledge, and joy: but to the sinner he giveth travail, to gather and to heap up, that he may give to him that is good before God. This also is vanity and vexation of spirit.

3 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

2 A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted;

3 A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;

4 A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;

5 A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

6 A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;

7 A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;

8 A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.

9 What profit hath he that worketh in that wherein he laboureth?

10 I have seen the travail, which God hath given to the sons of men to be exercised in it.

11 He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.

12 I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life.

13 And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labour, it is the gift of God.

14 I know that, whatsoever God doeth, it shall be for ever: nothing can be put to it, nor any thing taken from it: and God doeth it, that men should fear before him.

15 That which hath been is now; and that which is to be hath already been; and God requireth that which is past.

16 And moreover I saw under the sun the place of judgment, that wickedness was there; and the place of righteousness, that iniquity was there.

17 I said in mine heart, God shall judge the righteous and the wicked: for there is a time there for every purpose and for every work.

18 I said in mine heart concerning the estate of the sons of men, that God might manifest them, and that they might see that they themselves are beasts.

19 For that which befalleth the sons of men befalleth beasts; even one thing befalleth them: as the one dieth, so dieth the other; yea, they have all one breath; so that a man hath no preeminence above a beast: for all is vanity.

20 All go unto one place; all are of the dust, and all turn to dust again.

21 Who knoweth the spirit of man that goeth upward, and the spirit of the beast that goeth downward to the earth?

22 Wherefore I perceive that there is nothing better, than that a man should rejoice in his own works; for that is his portion: for who shall bring him to see what shall be after him?


4 So I returned, and considered all the oppressions that are done under the sun: and behold the tears of such as were oppressed, and they had no comforter; and on the side of their oppressors there was power; but they had no comforter.

2 Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive.

3 Yea, better is he than both they, which hath not yet been, who hath not seen the evil work that is done under the sun.

4 Again, I considered all travail, and every right work, that for this a man is envied of his neighbour. This is also vanity and vexation of spirit.

5 The fool foldeth his hands together, and eateth his own flesh.

6 Better is an handful with quietness, than both the hands full with travail and vexation of spirit.

7 Then I returned, and I saw vanity under the sun.

8 There is one alone, and there is not a second; yea, he hath neither child nor brother: yet is there no end of all his labour; neither is his eye satisfied with riches; neither saith he, For whom do I labour, and bereave my soul of good? This is also vanity, yea, it is a sore travail.

9 Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour.

10 For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up.

11 Again, if two lie together, then they have heat: but how can one be warm alone?

12 And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken.

13 Better is a poor and a wise child than an old and foolish king, who will no more be admonished.

14 For out of prison he cometh to reign; whereas also he that is born in his kingdom becometh poor.

15 I considered all the living which walk under the sun, with the second child that shall stand up in his stead.

16 There is no end of all the people, even of all that have been before them: they also that come after shall not rejoice in him. Surely this also is vanity and vexation of spirit.

5 Keep thy foot when thou goest to the house of God, and be more ready to hear, than to give the sacrifice of fools: for they consider not that they do evil.

2 Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon earth: therefore let thy words be few.

3 For a dream cometh through the multitude of business; and a fool's voice is known by multitude of words.

4 When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed.

5 Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay.

6 Suffer not thy mouth to cause thy flesh to sin; neither say thou before the angel, that it was an error: wherefore should God be angry at thy voice, and destroy the work of thine hands?

7 For in the multitude of dreams and many words there are also divers vanities: but fear thou God.

8 If thou seest the oppression of the poor, and violent perverting of judgment and justice in a province, marvel not at the matter: for he that is higher than the highest regardeth; and there be higher than they.

9 Moreover the profit of the earth is for all: the king himself is served by the field.

10 He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this is also vanity.

11 When goods increase, they are increased that eat them: and what good is there to the owners thereof, saving the beholding of them with their eyes?

12 The sleep of a labouring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

13 There is a sore evil which I have seen under the sun, namely, riches kept for the owners thereof to their hurt.

14 But those riches perish by evil travail: and he begetteth a son, and there is nothing in his hand.

15 As he came forth of his mother's womb, naked shall he return to go as he came, and shall take nothing of his labour, which he may carry away in his hand.

16 And this also is a sore evil, that in all points as he came, so shall he go: and what profit hath he that hath laboured for the wind?

17 All his days also he eateth in darkness, and he hath much sorrow and wrath with his sickness.

18 Behold that which I have seen: it is good and comely for one to eat and to drink, and to enjoy the good of all his labour that he taketh under the sun all the days of his life, which God giveth him: for it is his portion.

19 Every man also to whom God hath given riches and wealth, and hath given him power to eat thereof, and to take his portion, and to rejoice in his labour; this is the gift of God.

20 For he shall not much remember the days of his life; because God answereth him in the joy of his heart.

6 There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, and it is common among men:

2 A man to whom God hath given riches, wealth, and honour, so that he wanteth nothing for his soul of all that he desireth, yet God giveth him not power to eat thereof, but a stranger eateth it: this is vanity, and it is an evil disease.

3 If a man beget an hundred children, and live many years, so that the days of his years be many, and his soul be not filled with good, and also that he have no burial; I say, that an untimely birth is better than he.

4 For he cometh in with vanity, and departeth in darkness, and his name shall be covered with darkness.

5 Moreover he hath not seen the sun, nor known any thing: this hath more rest than the other.

6 Yea, though he live a thousand years twice told, yet hath he seen no good: do not all go to one place?

7 All the labour of man is for his mouth, and yet the appetite is not filled.

8 For what hath the wise more than the fool? what hath the poor, that knoweth to walk before the living?

9 Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and vexation of spirit.

10 That which hath been is named already, and it is known that it is man: neither may he contend with him that is mightier than he.

11 Seeing there be many things that increase vanity, what is man the better?

12 For who knoweth what is good for man in this life, all the days of his vain life which he spendeth as a shadow? for who can tell a man what shall be after him under the sun?

7 A good name is better than precious ointment; and the day of death than the day of one's birth.

2 It is better to go to the house of mourning, than to go to the house of feasting: for that is the end of all men; and the living will lay it to his heart.

3 Sorrow is better than laughter: for by the sadness of the countenance the heart is made better.

4 The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning; but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth.

5 It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise, than for a man to hear the song of fools.

6 For as the crackling of thorns under a pot, so is the laughter of the fool: this also is vanity.

7 Surely oppression maketh a wise man mad; and a gift destroyeth the heart.

8 Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.

9 Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry: for anger resteth in the bosom of fools.

10 Say not thou, What is the cause that the former days were better than these? for thou dost not enquire wisely concerning this.

11 Wisdom is good with an inheritance: and by it there is profit to them that see the sun.

12 For wisdom is a defence, and money is a defence: but the excellency of knowledge is, that wisdom giveth life to them that have it.

13 Consider the work of God: for who can make that straight, which he hath made crooked?

14 In the day of prosperity be joyful, but in the day of adversity consider: God also hath set the one over against the other, to the end that man should find nothing after him.

15 All things have I seen in the days of my vanity: there is a just man that perisheth in his righteousness, and there is a wicked man that prolongeth his life in his wickedness.

16 Be not righteous over much; neither make thyself over wise: why shouldest thou destroy thyself ?

17 Be not over much wicked, neither be thou foolish: why shouldest thou die before thy time?

18 It is good that thou shouldest take hold of this; yea, also from this withdraw not thine hand: for he that feareth God shall come forth of them all.

19 Wisdom strengtheneth the wise more than ten mighty men which are in the city.

20 For there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not.

21 Also take no heed unto all words that are spoken; lest thou hear thy servant curse thee:

22 For oftentimes also thine own heart knoweth that thou thyself likewise hast cursed others.

23 All this have I proved by wisdom: I said, I will be wise; but it was far from me.

24 That which is far off, and exceeding deep, who can find it out?

25 I applied mine heart to know, and to search, and to seek out wisdom, and the reason of things, and to know the wickedness of folly, even of foolishness and madness:

26 And I find more bitter than death the woman, whose heart is snares and nets, and her hands as bands: whoso pleaseth God shall escape from her; but the sinner shall be taken by her.

27 Behold, this have I found, saith the preacher, counting one by one, to find out the account:

28 Which yet my soul seeketh, but I find not: one man among a thousand have I found; but a woman among all those have I not found.

29 Lo, this only have I found, that God hath made man upright; but they have sought out many inventions.


...

and so forth.

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Old 9th March 2016, 01:34 PM   #258
calebprime
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Tough old birds vs. Frightened Does

I vastly prefer the tough old birds.

At my age, no matter how I try to engage, the does grow skittish at my words.

Today in the store, it was like some war, I was trying not to scare them.

In the library too, the same thing. They get this anxious look in their eyes, no

matter what you do.

The tough old birds have long since lost their indignation. Men haven't looked at them like that for a long time.

The frightened does are completely preoccupied with men hitting on them.

My son adds the twist:

That's because men are always hitting on them.
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Old 9th March 2016, 02:32 PM   #259
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Pianos and Regrets Redux

After stalking Camille for maybe 5 years, she finally came over to my house. I'd written a piece for her, and she looked it over for a moment, then played it perfectly. Not perfectly as in merely mechanical. Perfect as in expressive, and solving all the problems, and turning them into music.

Later, I payed a lot of money so a Japanese pianist could record the piece, mechanically perfect, but modified a little bit because she just couldn't make parts of it sound right. Somehow, Camille did that on the spot. This pianist was capable of remembering my instructions, so she simulated the feeling pretty well.

Pianos travel around from owner to owner. Joe Hinig finished Conservatory, and wanted nothing more than to simply walk a long distance, so I bought his piano. I lent it to Susan for a few years. Later I sold it, don't remember.

There was also a Steinway or two in the same room at Nottinghill Road in Brighton. So that room saw the Kawai that was first Joe's, then a Steinway grand. Lorraine Hunt came by to sing Christmas carols once in that same room.

Next there was a Steinway upright from Lili's parents. Caleb Sampson came by once, and showed no genuine spark of enthusiasm except for two things: He jammed on that Steinway for about ten minutes, and put me in my place. He also doodled a little game of hangman on an envelope, leaving some of the letters blank.

This must have all happened after the failed psilocybin farm, because Lili made me throw that out. It reeked of Lysol, and produced nothing but exotic molds.
It wouldn't do to have that in the dining room.

A piano tuner came over one time. He'd had a tumor removed from his brain, on the right side of his head, and still bore some scars. Everything seemed routine. He came in with his kit, and got to tuning. Maybe you know what a piano being tuned sounds like.

When he was all done, I came in to pay him. I checked the tuning, and, for the first and only time, I said I just couldn't accept it. It was horrible. Not even close. Not anywhere near equal-temperament.

He denied it. He also said that uprights like this can't really be tuned.

I said, give it another shot.

I was a little startled to hear the lid being slammed down, hard.

He gave up. It wasn't much money; I still paid him.

Did he not know that he couldn't tune any more? Had no one called him on it?
This wasn't subtle at all.

Debbie Cyr has come over a dozen times, and it's been perfect every single time.

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Old 9th March 2016, 02:41 PM   #260
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Red Diaper Paranoia

There wasn't much time left, but Josh hadn't really been interested in my quarter-tone work, anyway.

I was facing the screen on my computer, and when I turned around to look at Josh for a second, he was angry like I've almost never seen him.

Usually, he's as laid back as Ben Carson. Now he was almost livid.

What's your avatar?

Oh, that's a real schmuck named Roy Cohn.

I know who it is. Why do you have a picture of Roy Cohn as your avatar?

Well, it's just an idea I had a few years ago. You see, it's cropped, for one thing. Mapplethorpe has him swimming in this big sea of blackness. Now he's not, so it's different. And I had to lower the resolution, so you don't really see all that wonderful, hallucinatory, gruesome detail.

(In fact, MnBrant thought it might be George Carlin!)

So, to me at least, it goes: Roy ---> Mapplethorpe ---> Angels in America ----> cropped and softened

That's supposed to be nested irony or something.

My father was also a talented closeted gay man, like Roy Cohn. But unlike him, he was mostly incapable of manipulation. He wanted to paint pretty pictures, or buy them.

Roy Cohn was a masculine-acting man who denied that he was gay.

Josh was still pissed. It's not clear if he felt he knew better than I did, and wanted to save me from myself, or whether he just didn't want to be there in the first place.

With Josh, the hipster-stoner thing gives way to deeper behavior in a crisis, or in response to deaths and anniversaries. You follow the forms. He always seems a little concerned that I don't. Follow the forms, that is.

I remembered. Like one of my girlfriends -- the really sexy one who took off her clothes at Club Med -- he was a red diaper baby. The paranoia lasted for generations.

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Old 9th March 2016, 03:09 PM   #261
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Remembering Steve Prosser

http://www.berklee-blogs.com/2012/10...steve-prosser/


The last time I saw Steve was in the Au Bon Pain on Mass Ave, down from Berklee.

We spoke of our unrequited loves, and a few mutal friends, like Gary Kelly.

I'm remembering one little misunderstanding Steve had about me. It was telling.
He thought I had "good Central Pennsylvanian common sense". Well, what little sense I have isn't common, and it isn't from Pennsylvania. Otherwise, he was right.

For reasons I can't explain, I loved Steve Prosser immediately, and without much complication. But we went our separate ways.

Then, he was inside the citadel, and I was one of the hordes, trying to get in. I needed a job.

Berklee is one of the most efficient places I've ever known in its ability to reject job applicants. And they never return your scores, so I just gave up.

I wouldn't really fit in there, anyway.

I'm going to publish our exchange, because he's no longer alive, and there's nothing much there that will hurt him. On my end, what do I care? I'll never work in this town again, anyway.




----------------------------------------

I'd looked at his resume. I was really impressed -- he had a law degree, among other things.

----------------------------

Hi Steve,

I'd like to buy you coffee or just hang out.* I'm
thinking about going back to school and I need to find
a part-time job somewhere--so that's what's on my
mind, but I don't know about that Berklee library job
I mentioned.* I'm confused and definitely a little
worried about the future.* This is the first time I've
really thought about it.

What I've been up to--10 years of local
video-scoring--PBS, industrials.* Don't have the
endurance, etc. for that work any more. Married and
have a 9-year old son.* Taught the electronic music
class at NEC for 5 years--and that didn't work out
like I hoped--they had me on the adjunct track (1
class, low pay).* As long as you only have a master's
degree, I guess, you're a dime a dozen.* My
theoretical interests still interest me, and not too
many other people...

Doleful sh*t.*

Call me (xxx xxx xxxx) or I'll call you if you want to
get together.

Caleb



> Hi Caleb,
>
> I sometimes wonder what happened to you . . . You
> disappeared off of*
> my radar.
>
> Yea, I have had enough schooling and administrating.
>* I'm going back*
> to the Faculty as a full professor with summers
> off--can't wait.* Can*
> hardly wait to do regular practicing and writing.
> And will be glad*
> to teach again more--developing some personally
> interesting*
> electives, bla, bla.
>
> Where the f**k are you living, what have you been
> doing all of these*
> years?* Answer whatever you want.
>
> As to the librarian job, damned if I know.* Are you
> a librarian?***
> What library experience do you have.* You realize,
> Caleb, that*
> spending your days at the BPL mumbling and
> slobbering over Wallace*
> Stevens is not satisfactory experience.* If you
> apply, let me know*
> and I'll call my old buddy Gary Haggerty and blow
> some smoke up his*
> ass about you.
>
> Feel free to call me:* xxx xxx xxxx
>
> Best,
> Steve


Then there was an email missing. In it, Steve essentially said that Berklee was diverse and prospering like never before, and that you could find almost anything there. Which is both true in general and untrue for me. And there might have been something about how he resented me hitting on him.

Here's what I wrote in response.

It's amazing to me that I'm still thinking about the same things. Or maybe not.


I was pretty discouraged and upset by our email exchange.

You should know that I like your music, respect you as a teacher and as someone who has accomplished a lot, and that I carry an idealized image of you around with me -- like I do with only a few other friends. *I don't talk with any of these other friends, either. *

I'm not interested in hitting on you for a job at Berklee, which seems like a pretty remote possibility anyway.

Now here's all I wanted to say today.

You were right that having a large pool of people to choose from is essential. *

I went through all the faculty bios of people in the comp department. *I also looked up the same people in Rate My Professor (funny) *-- to get the student dirt, and when possible, I listened to the music of people who seemed to be interested in similar things.

What I'm going to say is in no way a criticism of Berklee.

There seems to be a large number of people who teach traditional skills -- conductors, especially. *Nothing wrong with that, but not what I'm looking to work on.

Of the two people who are interested in modernist electronic music, Richard Boulanger and Derek Hurst, I was able to hear a brief snippet of Boulanger's music, and a handful of excerpts of Hurst's music on his website.

It may be that Boulanger has written some music that I would like -- haven't found any, just yet. *I'm not interested in C sound or Max. *Those are both useful tools for some people, but I'm interested in using off-the-shelf gear in non-standard ways.*

Hurst seems to be the guy who writes modernist pieces for electronics and players.

I disliked Hurst's music. *In five excerpts, there was not one lyrical, pretty, beautiful, or delicate moment. *There was a certain sameness, as well. *Nervous twittery dissonant counterpoint, without much going on in the bass.

So, I'm a little choosy.

Now, here's the thing.

An example:

Although Randy Roos and I would never get along personally, I have enormous respect for his accomplishments and chops as a guitarist, engineer, and film-scorer. *

But I wouldn't have known that just from reading the faculty bios. * I wouldn't have known where to look.

So, it might well be that there is someone whose music I liked who I would get along with, but that person is not listed in the comp department.

I've been friends with Josh xxx a long time. *But he and I have completely different interests in how to go about making music.

And finally.

To focus my search a little more, I'm looking for a peer-to-peer relationship with someone who I pay to be a witness or coach.

So, not a master-disciple relationship, but not a composition buddy relationship, either.

I jest, but only half-jest: *Like a sponser in Composer's Anonymous.

Hard to find!

Maybe such a person exists, however.

Someone with the chops of Randy Roos, the taste of Steve Prosser, the non-authoritarian kindness of Josh.

Steve, you don't have to answer.

But I wanted to let you know that I'm sincere, at least.

Be well. *Holiday season almost over! *Phew.

Caleb
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Old 10th March 2016, 01:51 AM   #262
calebprime
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Ian Fleming, sex tapes, and Non-Ver something or other

Quote:
The girl put her hand up to her throat and the cloak of black feathers came away from the front of her body and spread out
into a five-foot black fan. She swirled it slowly behind her until it stood up like a peacock's tail. She was naked except for a brief vee of black lace and a black sequin star in the centre of each breast and the thin black domino across her eyes. Her body was small, hard, bronze, beautiful. It was slightly oiled and glinted in the white light.
The audience was silent. The drums began to step up the tempo. The bass drum kept its beat dead on the timing of the human pulse.
The girl's naked stomach started slowly to revolve in time with the rhythm. She swept the black feathers across and behind her again, and her hips started to grind in time with the bass drum. The upper part of her body was motionless. The black feathers swirled again, and now her feet were shifting and her shoulders. The drums beat louder. Each part of her body seemed to be keeping a different time. Her lips were bared slightly from her teeth. Her nostrils began to flare. Her eyes glinted hotly through the diamond slits. It was a sexy, pug-like face — chienne was the only word Bond could think of.
The drums thudded faster, a complexity of interlaced rhythms. The girl tossed the big fan off the floor, held her arms up above her head. Her whole body began to shiver. Her belly moved faster. Round and round, in and out. Her legs straddled. Her hips began to revolve in a wide circle. Suddenly she plucked the sequin star off her right breast and threw it into the audience. The first noise came from the spectators, a quiet growl. Then they were silent again. She plucked off the other star. Again the growl and then silence. The drums began to crash and roll. Sweat poured off the drummers. Their hands fluttered like grey flannel on the pale membranes. Their eyes were bulging, distant. Their heads were slightly bent to one side as if they were listening. They hardly glanced at the girl. The audience panted softly, liquid eyes bulging and rolling.

I think we were at our luxurious Buckminster Fuller dome-house the year that I first peeked at my brother's library book called _Live and Let Die_. We had to stay at a hotel for part of that time, because there was a full gale. The wind had torn off most of the panels of the Bucky house, and our library books had gotten soaked. It would be a few weeks before the dome house would be inhabitable.

A little damp on the page didn't bother me, though.

I had discovered the written sex scene -- maybe not the one I quoted above. It doesn't matter, it will do.

I'm pretty sure that the writing of Ian Fleming is the cornerstone of my erotic imagination.

In this way, I resemble the beetle that will mate with the bottle. I would contend, though, that this is the only way I resemble a beetle.

Just because my sexuality depends on ridiculous and banal scripts, as dumb as a post, doesn't mean that everything about my perception is, um, non-veridical.

In one way, and only one way, is my brother right. We do replay tapes. Sex tapes.

I don't try to mate with bottles. Just slightly damp Ian Fleming novels.

Last edited by calebprime; 10th March 2016 at 02:26 AM.
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Old 10th March 2016, 04:45 AM   #263
calebprime
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Is it not said: When the putz stands up, the brains fly out the window?
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Old 10th March 2016, 08:04 AM   #264
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Editor's Note: Calebprime's wife Lili has informed us that it was decided that he relocate temporarily to the McLean Campus for some well-deserved rest.

Therefore, out of respect for his great achievements and service to his reading public, we ask that you not try to reach him there.

We have two more entries from Mr. Prime. The penultimate one, it turns out, was called "You've Been Practicing."

Mr. Prime's computer was found heavily damaged and water-logged. Apparently, during the breakdown, Prime felt such remorse at what he had written that he tried to destroy it. It was found by someone walking her dog along the Muddy River.

An all-out effort by our forensic team allowed us to reconstruct bits of both entries. The final entry is called: "Someday We'll All Meet at the end of Main Street at Rt. 128". Clearly, he was under some strain.

Let's all wish him well.

Sarah & Sam Dreyfus, editors
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Old 10th March 2016, 08:28 AM   #265
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You've Bee@Rn Practicing

Don't worry Marty said t$hey can tell how good you are.

I was worried about choking during the auditions. )(*

They gave you ratings. Sight-Reading, Comping (or playing chords), and Soloing, each on a scale of 1 to 9.

It was said that only Gary Burton had all 9's.

I was excited about going to Berklee and wanted to pump Marty for information, but he was kind of pissy.

For one thing, he ranked on me about the changes to my tunes.

"The melody is ok on this one, Spring is Here, but look. These sus chords. This is basically the changes to Midnight at the Oasis!"

Marty took a swig on his coke.

...and this one, what's with t##he diminished chords? Nobody writes diminished chords. It sounds like Dixieland going backwards or something."

He was right. We both agree I should go to Berklee.

But I still felt pretty good, because I liked my songs, even if the changes were wrong, and I was playing through a Leslie, which sounded really good to me.

What if I were misunderstood? What if they couldn't see my talent. In a few years, I'd be as good as Pat Metheny, but maybe...well, I believed Marty.

When I got there, I choked so bad that they gave me a rating of 1,3,7. I couldn't read, and I got lost during 500 Miles High. Which should have been easy, but my hands were shaking. Lan gton, my theory teacher, had never taught us how to sight-read rhythm.

They put me in the remedial ensembles, in the large cla ssroom, with the guys who couldn't tune their guitars, or had strings missing, or where playing with rubber bands on cardboard boxes.

I learned to sight-read rhythms, pretty soon.

But my playing got worse, because there were at least 35 faculty members who
could do more on one string than I could on six. And all anyone wanted to talk about was guitar hardware. What kind of pickups, what kind of picks, what kind. Could have been a garage.

Eventually I got into an ok ensemble. The drummer was some weird okie who kept up a constant stream of quarter-notes on his kick-drum, boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom 8 to the bar, like he thought he was Louie Bellson or somebody. But the teacher was George Garzone.

What can I say. Leader of The Fringe. Nice guy. Played with The Grateful Dead. Came in saying he was trying to slim down, and always ate some strawberry yogurt. He was another Coltrane-style player, but really, really good.

I didn't feel like I needed to work, until George called Nefertiti for the next week. One of my favorite songs, and hard changes.

In fact, neither Miles nor Wayne Shorter really solo on the changes.

I spent the next week practicing, getting ready so that I could solo when my momemtn came.

George counts it off, and, well, it wasn't like playing with Tony Williams. More like Louie Bellson.

Boom Boom Boom Boom
Dwee, dee | DEE dah do dwe DAH.... went the theme.

We played for a little while, and George stopped us, and had a little chat with the drummer. Something about
not being so heavy with his feet. Try using his ride cymbal, maybe.

And he looked over at me.

"You've been practicing", he said.

Great guy.

Last edited by calebprime; 10th March 2016 at 08:30 AM.
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Old 10th March 2016, 09:09 AM   #266
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This version gets the note-names right, and works in 12EDO (normal tuning) as well as 24EDO (quarter-tones.)

It may already be a useful tool to work with.

More features to come, though.

Source Code first.

Test output, second.


; okay to change these

(define modulus 12)
(define length-min 7) ; minimum number of notes in scale
(define length-max 7) ; maximum number of notes in scale
(define wolves '()) ; wolf intervals
(define wolf-max 2) ; this many wolves are ok, but no more
(define distance-2-min 1) ; minimum difference between any 2 consecutive notes in scale
(define distance-3-min 3) ; minimum difference between the lowest and highest notes
; of any 3 consecutive notes in scale
(define bad-notes '()) ; never use these notes

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;;
; don't change stuff below

; A note is represented as a nonnegative integer less than modulus.
; A scale is represented as a list of notes.

(define (interval a b)
(modulo (- b a) modulus))

(define (notes->intervals ns)
(if (null? ns)
'()
(let ((first (car ns)))
(let recur ((n first)
(rest (cdr ns)))
(if (null? rest)
(list (interval n first))
(cons (interval n (car rest))
(recur (car rest) (cdr rest))))))))

(define (display-2-12 s)
(let recur ((s s)
(b #t))
(when (pair? s)
(cond
((< (car s) 12) (display (car s)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #t))
(b (display "| ") (recur s #f))
(else (display (- (car s) 12)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #f))))))

(define (display-scale s)
(display "notes: ")
(display s)
(newline)
(display "intervals: ")
(let ((x (notes->intervals s)))
(display (append x x)))
(newline)
(case modulus
((12) (for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings (map (lambda (n) (* n 2)) s))))
((24) (display-2-12 s) (newline)
(for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings s))))
(newline))

(define scales '())

(define (found! scale)
(let ((s (reverse scale)))
(set! scales (cons s scales))
(display-scale s)))


; notes is a list of allowable notes
; n-len is the length of notes
; scale is the scale so far
; s-len is the length of scale
; wolf is the number of wolf intervals in scale
; micro is the number of odd notes in scale (min needed is 1, if modulus is 24)

; call found! for every scale that follows the rules and
; that can be made by adding to 'scale' any number (> 0)
; of notes from 'notes'
(define (find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (positive? n-len)
(< s-len length-max)
(>= (+ s-len n-len) length-min))
(let ((n (car notes))
(notes (cdr notes))
(n-len (- n-len 1)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (distances-ok? n scale s-len)
(let ((wolf (+ wolf (count-wolves n scale))))
(when (<= wolf wolf-max)
(let ((micro (+ micro (if (odd? n) 1 0)))
(scale (cons n scale))
(s-len (+ 1 s-len)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (>= s-len length-min)
(if (= modulus 24) (>= micro 1) #t)
(final-distances-ok? scale s-len))
(found! scale)))))))))

(define (distances-ok? n scale len)
(and (>= (interval (car scale) n) distance-2-min)
(or (<= len 1)
(and (>= (interval (cadr scale) n) distance-3-min)
(>= (interval n (list-ref scale (- len 2))) distance-3-min)))))

(define (final-distances-ok? scale len)
(and (>= (interval (car scale) 0) distance-2-min)
(>= (interval (cadr scale) 0) distance-3-min)))

(define (count-wolves n scale)
(fold-left (lambda (sum note)
(+ sum
(if (member (interval note n) wolves) 1 0)
(if (member (interval n note) wolves) 1 0)))
0 scale))

(define note-names
'#(("A" ) ; 0
("A+" "A#-" "Bb-") ; 1
("A#" "Bb" ) ; 2
("A#+" "Bb+" "B-" ) ; 3
("B" ) ; 4
("B+" "C-" ) ; 5
("C" ) ; 6
("C+" "C#-" "Db-") ; 7
("C#" "Db" ) ; 8
("C#+" "Db+" "D-" ) ; 9
("D" ) ; 10
("D+" "D#-" "Eb-") ; 11
("D#" "Eb" ) ; 12
("D#+" "Eb+" "E-" ) ; 13
("E" ) ; 14
("E+" "F-" ) ; 15
("F" ) ; 16
("F+" "F#-" "Gb-") ; 17
("F#" "Gb" ) ; 18
("F#+" "Gb+" "G-" ) ; 19
("G" ) ; 20
("G+" "G#-" "Ab-") ; 21
("G#" "Ab" ) ; 22
("G#+" "Ab+" "A-" ) ; 23
))

; A name code represents, e.g., F#+, as
; a list of three numbers, one for the F,
; one for the # and one for the +.
;
; first number: A through G are 0 through 6, respectively.
; second number: b is -1, # is +1, none is 0.
; third number: - is -1, + is +1, none is 0.

(define code-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 1)
(#\C . 2)
(#\D . 3)
(#\E . 4)
(#\F . 5)
(#\G . 6)))

; assumes name is properly capitalized
; i.e., first letter is capital, rest aren't
(define (name->code name)
(let ((lst (string->list name)))
(let ((letter (car lst))
(accidentals (cdr lst)))
(list
(cdr (assoc letter code-values))
(cond
((member #\b accidentals) -1)
((member #\# accidentals) +1)
(else 0))
(cond
((member #\- accidentals) -1)
((member #\+ accidentals) +1)
(else 0))))))

(define (code->name code)
(let ((x (car code))
(y (cadr code))
(z (caddr code)))
(string-append
(string (car (list-ref code-values x)))
(case y
((-1) "b")
((+1) "#")
(else ""))
(case z
((-1) "-")
((+1) "+")
(else "")))))

; same structure as note-names, i.e. vector of lists,
; except with each name replaced by the corresponding code
(define name-codes
(vector-map (lambda (name-list) (map name->code name-list))
note-names))

(define note-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 4)
(#\C . 6)
(#\D . 10)
(#\E . 14)
(#\F . 16)
(#\G . 20)
(#\# . 2)
(#\b . -2)
(#\+ . 1)
(#\- . -1)))

(define (string->note s)
(apply +
(map (lambda (c) (cdr (assoc c note-values)))
(let ((cs (string->list s)))
(cons (char-upcase (car cs))
(map char-downcase (cdr cs)))))))

(define (cross-product . x)
(if (null? x)
'(())
(apply append
(map (lambda (a)
(map (lambda (b) (cons a b))
(apply cross-product (cdr x))))
(car x)))))

(define (vector-increment v i)
(vector-set! v i (+ 1 (vector-ref v i))))

; measures the extent to which letters are repeated
; lower is better
(define (repetitiveness x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 7 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c) (vector-increment v (car c)))
x)
(apply + (map (lambda (x) (* x x))
(vector->list v)))))

; # of flats or # of sharps, whichever is smaller
(define (accidental-consistency x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 3 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c) (vector-increment v (+ 1 (cadr c))))
x)
(min (vector-ref v 0)
(vector-ref v 2))))

; returns list of those items x of lst for which (f x) is least
(define (min-scorers f lst)
(let* ((scored-lst (map (lambda (x) (cons (f x) x))
lst))
(min-score (fold-left (lambda (a x) (min a (car x)))
(caar scored-lst) (cdr scored-lst))))
(map cdr
(filter (lambda (x) (equal? (car x) min-score))
scored-lst))))

(define (best-spellings scale)
(let* ((all-spellings (apply cross-product
(map (lambda (n) (vector-ref name-codes n))
scale)))
(best (min-scorers accidental-consistency
(min-scorers repetitiveness all-spellings))))
(map (lambda (scale) (map code->name scale))
best)))

(define (go)
(set! scales '())
(let ((allowed-notes (remp (lambda (n) (member n bad-notes))
(cdr (iota modulus)))))
(find-scales allowed-notes (length allowed-notes) '(0) 1 0 0)
(newline)
(display (length scales))
(display " scales found")))

(go)







> (load "Desktop/microtonal4.txt")
notes: (0 3 5 6 8 9 11)
intervals: (3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1)
(A C D Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 3 4 6 8 9 11)
intervals: (3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1)
(A C Db Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 3 4 6 7 9 11)
intervals: (3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1)
(A C C# D# E F# G#)

notes: (0 3 4 6 7 9 10)
intervals: (3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2)
(A C C# D# E F# G)

notes: (0 2 5 6 8 9 11)
intervals: (2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1)
(A B D Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 2 4 6 8 9 11)
intervals: (2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1)
(A B C# D# F F# G#)
(A B Db Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 2 4 6 7 9 11)
intervals: (2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1)
(A B C# D# E F# G#)

notes: (0 2 4 6 7 9 10)
intervals: (2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2)
(A B C# D# E F# G)

notes: (0 2 4 5 8 9 11)
intervals: (2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1)
(A B C# D F F# G#)

notes: (0 2 4 5 7 9 11)
intervals: (2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1)
(A B C# D E F# G#)

notes: (0 2 4 5 7 9 10)
intervals: (2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2)
(A B C# D E F# G)

notes: (0 2 4 5 7 8 11)
intervals: (2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1)
(A B C# D E F G#)

notes: (0 2 4 5 7 8 10)
intervals: (2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2)
(A B C# D E F G)

notes: (0 2 3 6 8 9 11)
intervals: (2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1)
(A B C D# F F# G#)
(A B C Eb F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 2 3 6 7 9 11)
intervals: (2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1)
(A B C D# E F# G#)

notes: (0 2 3 6 7 9 10)
intervals: (2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2)
(A B C D# E F# G)

notes: (0 2 3 5 8 9 11)
intervals: (2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1)
(A B C D F F# G#)
(A B C D F Gb Ab)

notes: (0 2 3 5 7 9 11)
intervals: (2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1)
(A B C D E F# G#)

notes: (0 2 3 5 7 9 10)
intervals: (2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2)
(A B C D E F# G)

notes: (0 2 3 5 7 8 11)
intervals: (2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1)
(A B C D E F G#)

notes: (0 2 3 5 7 8 10)
intervals: (2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2)
(A B C D E F G)

notes: (0 2 3 5 6 9 11)
intervals: (2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1)
(A B C D Eb F# G#)

notes: (0 2 3 5 6 9 10)
intervals: (2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2)
(A B C D Eb F# G)

notes: (0 2 3 5 6 8 11)
intervals: (2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1)
(A B C D Eb F G#)

notes: (0 2 3 5 6 8 10)
intervals: (2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2)
(A B C D Eb F G)

notes: (0 2 3 5 6 8 9)
intervals: (2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3)
(A B C D Eb F Gb)

notes: (0 1 4 6 7 9 10)
intervals: (1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2)
(A Bb C# D# E F# G)

notes: (0 1 4 5 7 9 10)
intervals: (1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2)
(A Bb C# D E F# G)

notes: (0 1 4 5 7 8 10)
intervals: (1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2)
(A Bb C# D E F G)

notes: (0 1 3 6 7 9 10)
intervals: (1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2)
(A Bb C D# E F# G)

notes: (0 1 3 5 7 9 10)
intervals: (1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2)
(A Bb C D E F# G)

notes: (0 1 3 5 7 8 10)
intervals: (1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2)
(A Bb C D E F G)

notes: (0 1 3 5 6 9 10)
intervals: (1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2)
(A Bb C D Eb F# G)

notes: (0 1 3 5 6 8 10)
intervals: (1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2)
(A Bb C D Eb F G)

notes: (0 1 3 5 6 8 9)
intervals: (1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3)
(A Bb C D Eb F Gb)

notes: (0 1 3 4 7 9 10)
intervals: (1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2)
(A Bb C Db E F# G)

notes: (0 1 3 4 7 8 10)
intervals: (1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 2)
(A Bb C Db E F G)

notes: (0 1 3 4 6 9 10)
intervals: (1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2)
(A Bb C Db Eb F# G)

notes: (0 1 3 4 6 8 10)
intervals: (1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2)
(A Bb C Db Eb F G)

notes: (0 1 3 4 6 8 9)
intervals: (1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 3)
(A Bb C Db Eb F Gb)

notes: (0 1 3 4 6 7 10)
intervals: (1 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2)
(A Bb C Db Eb E G)

notes: (0 1 3 4 6 7 9)
intervals: (1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3)
(A Bb C Db Eb E Gb)


42 scales found

Last edited by calebprime; 10th March 2016 at 09:11 AM.
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Old 10th March 2016, 03:29 PM   #267
calebprime
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This version transposes as well

After loading the file into the interpreter,
and after the program prints the scales that
it found, you can type

(print (transpose scales 5))

into the interpreter to transpose all the
scales up by 5 notes. Of course, you can
use any number you like, not just 5. To
transpose down, use a negative number.




; okay to change these

(define modulus 12)
(define length-min 7) ; minimum number of notes in scale
(define length-max 7) ; maximum number of notes in scale
(define wolves '()) ; wolf intervals
(define wolf-max 2) ; this many wolves are ok, but no more
(define distance-2-min 1) ; minimum difference between any 2 consecutive notes in scale
(define distance-3-min 3) ; minimum difference between the lowest and highest notes
; of any 3 consecutive notes in scale
(define bad-notes '()) ; never use these notes

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;;
; don't change stuff below

; A note is represented as a nonnegative integer less than modulus.
; A scale is represented as a list of notes.

(define (interval a b)
(modulo (- b a) modulus))

(define (transpose-note n k)
(modulo (+ n k) modulus))

(define (apply-to-leaves f x)
(cond
((null? x) '())
((pair? x) (cons (apply-to-leaves f (car x))
(apply-to-leaves f (cdr x))))
(else (f x))))

(define (transpose x k)
(apply-to-leaves (lambda (n) (transpose-note n k))
x))

(define (notes->intervals ns)
(if (null? ns)
'()
(let ((first (car ns)))
(let recur ((n first)
(rest (cdr ns)))
(if (null? rest)
(list (interval n first))
(cons (interval n (car rest))
(recur (car rest) (cdr rest))))))))

(define (display-2-12 s)
(let recur ((s s)
(b #t))
(when (pair? s)
(cond
((< (car s) 12) (display (car s)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #t))
(b (display "| ") (recur s #f))
(else (display (- (car s) 12)) (display " ") (recur (cdr s) #f))))))

(define (display-scale s)
(display "notes: ")
(display s)
(newline)
(display "intervals: ")
(let ((x (notes->intervals s)))
(display (append x x)))
(newline)
(case modulus
((12) (for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings (map (lambda (n) (* n 2)) s))))
((24) (display-2-12 s) (newline)
(for-each (lambda (x) (display x) (newline))
(best-spellings s))))
(newline))

(define (display-scales ss)
(for-each display-scale ss))

(define (display-note n)
(display n)
(case modulus
((12) (display " ") (display (vector-ref note-names (* n 2))))
((24) (display " ") (display (vector-ref note-names n)))))

(define (print x)
(cond
((number? x) (display-note x))
((and (pair? x) (pair? (car x))) (display-scales x))
((pair? x) (display-scale x))))

(define scales '())

(define (found! scale)
(let ((s (reverse scale)))
(set! scales (cons s scales))
(display-scale s)))


; notes is a list of allowable notes
; n-len is the length of notes
; scale is the scale so far
; s-len is the length of scale
; wolf is the number of wolf intervals in scale
; micro is the number of odd notes in scale (min needed is 1, if modulus is 24)

; call found! for every scale that follows the rules and
; that can be made by adding to 'scale' any number (> 0)
; of notes from 'notes'
(define (find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (positive? n-len)
(< s-len length-max)
(>= (+ s-len n-len) length-min))
(let ((n (car notes))
(notes (cdr notes))
(n-len (- n-len 1)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (distances-ok? n scale s-len)
(let ((wolf (+ wolf (count-wolves n scale))))
(when (<= wolf wolf-max)
(let ((micro (+ micro (if (odd? n) 1 0)))
(scale (cons n scale))
(s-len (+ 1 s-len)))
(find-scales notes n-len scale s-len wolf micro)
(when (and (>= s-len length-min)
(if (= modulus 24) (>= micro 1) #t)
(final-distances-ok? scale s-len))
(found! scale)))))))))

(define (distances-ok? n scale len)
(and (>= (interval (car scale) n) distance-2-min)
(or (<= len 1)
(and (>= (interval (cadr scale) n) distance-3-min)
(>= (interval n (list-ref scale (- len 2))) distance-3-min)))))

(define (final-distances-ok? scale len)
(and (>= (interval (car scale) 0) distance-2-min)
(>= (interval (cadr scale) 0) distance-3-min)))

(define (count-wolves n scale)
(fold-left (lambda (sum note)
(+ sum
(if (member (interval note n) wolves) 1 0)
(if (member (interval n note) wolves) 1 0)))
0 scale))

(define note-names
'#(("A" ) ; 0
("A+" "A#-" "Bb-") ; 1
("A#" "Bb" ) ; 2
("A#+" "Bb+" "B-" ) ; 3
("B" ) ; 4
("B+" "C-" ) ; 5
("C" ) ; 6
("C+" "C#-" "Db-") ; 7
("C#" "Db" ) ; 8
("C#+" "Db+" "D-" ) ; 9
("D" ) ; 10
("D+" "D#-" "Eb-") ; 11
("D#" "Eb" ) ; 12
("D#+" "Eb+" "E-" ) ; 13
("E" ) ; 14
("E+" "F-" ) ; 15
("F" ) ; 16
("F+" "F#-" "Gb-") ; 17
("F#" "Gb" ) ; 18
("F#+" "Gb+" "G-" ) ; 19
("G" ) ; 20
("G+" "G#-" "Ab-") ; 21
("G#" "Ab" ) ; 22
("G#+" "Ab+" "A-" ) ; 23
))

; A name code represents, e.g., F#+, as
; a list of three numbers, one for the F,
; one for the # and one for the +.
;
; first number: A through G are 0 through 6, respectively.
; second number: b is -1, # is +1, none is 0.
; third number: - is -1, + is +1, none is 0.

(define code-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 1)
(#\C . 2)
(#\D . 3)
(#\E . 4)
(#\F . 5)
(#\G . 6)))

; assumes name is properly capitalized
; i.e., first letter is capital, rest aren't
(define (name->code name)
(let ((lst (string->list name)))
(let ((letter (car lst))
(accidentals (cdr lst)))
(list
(cdr (assoc letter code-values))
(cond
((member #\b accidentals) -1)
((member #\# accidentals) +1)
(else 0))
(cond
((member #\- accidentals) -1)
((member #\+ accidentals) +1)
(else 0))))))

(define (code->name code)
(let ((x (car code))
(y (cadr code))
(z (caddr code)))
(string-append
(string (car (list-ref code-values x)))
(case y
((-1) "b")
((+1) "#")
(else ""))
(case z
((-1) "-")
((+1) "+")
(else "")))))

; same structure as note-names, i.e. vector of lists,
; except with each name replaced by the corresponding code
(define name-codes
(vector-map (lambda (name-list) (map name->code name-list))
note-names))

(define note-values
'((#\A . 0)
(#\B . 4)
(#\C . 6)
(#\D . 10)
(#\E . 14)
(#\F . 16)
(#\G . 20)
(#\# . 2)
(#\b . -2)
(#\+ . 1)
(#\- . -1)))

(define (string->note s)
(apply +
(map (lambda (c) (cdr (assoc c note-values)))
(let ((cs (string->list s)))
(cons (char-upcase (car cs))
(map char-downcase (cdr cs)))))))

(define (cross-product . x)
(if (null? x)
'(())
(apply append
(map (lambda (a)
(map (lambda (b) (cons a b))
(apply cross-product (cdr x))))
(car x)))))

(define (vector-increment! v i)
(vector-set! v i (+ 1 (vector-ref v i))))

; measures the extent to which letters are repeated
(define (repetitiveness x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 7 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c) (vector-increment! v (car c)))
x)
(apply + (map (lambda (x) (* x x))
(vector->list v)))))

; # of flats or # of sharps, whichever is smaller
(define (accidental-consistency x) ; x: list of name codes
(let ((v (make-vector 3 0)))
(for-each (lambda (c) (vector-increment! v (+ 1 (cadr c))))
x)
(min (vector-ref v 0)
(vector-ref v 2))))

; returns list of those items x of lst for which (f x) is least
(define (min-scorers f lst)
(let* ((scored-lst (map (lambda (x) (cons (f x) x))
lst))
(min-score (fold-left (lambda (a x) (min a (car x)))
(caar scored-lst) (cdr scored-lst))))
(map cdr
(filter (lambda (x) (equal? (car x) min-score))
scored-lst))))

(define (best-spellings scale)
(let* ((all-spellings (apply cross-product
(map (lambda (n) (vector-ref name-codes n))
scale)))
(best (min-scorers accidental-consistency
(min-scorers repetitiveness all-spellings))))
(map (lambda (scale) (map code->name scale))
best)))

(define (go)
(set! scales '())
(let ((allowed-notes (remp (lambda (n) (member n bad-notes))
(cdr (iota modulus)))))
(find-scales allowed-notes (length allowed-notes) '(0) 1 0 0)
(set! scales (reverse scales))
(newline)
(display (length scales))
(display " scales found")))

(go)
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Old 10th March 2016, 04:48 PM   #268
calebprime
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Annals of hypomania, part 56.

Prime is having these conversations a lot, even outside the hospital grounds.


Prime had gone off reservation.

Maybe they'd revoke some privileges, but it was worth it to feel the rain on his face.

A corner store. Some Oj.

He's seen M the clerk many times there.

Yesterday, she'd looked ashen and sad, so he locked eyes with her for a second, and said
"Feel better." and tried his sad smile.

She looked grateful. Even a little smile, returning.

Today, from 15 feet away, Prime could see she looked better, but was impatient,
troubled, and thinking hard.

The other shoppers, including the very large construction worker with the arms
like huge hams, finally cleared out. Prime watched her glance briefly at ham-arms
and that she was afraid. Ham arms himself -- work boots, keys on a ring on the left side,
looked a little tired and like he wouldn't take any crap from anybody, but ok. Red pitted skin.
Maybe a 30 second fuse, but then he'd really **** you up.

She's talked to me many times, often to chide me for buying too much milk.

She can't understand why. Probably milk disagrees with her.

I have my bag right on the counter, and I can see she can't quite get that.

She starts to take out a plastic bag, and I say: No, I'm good.

"You don't want a bag?"

For once, I put on the high beams, look her straight in the eye.

She's far-sighted, has the convex lenses that make her eyes look larger and a little startled.

"Do you remember me?" I say.

"No," matter of factly, but not bitterly, "I don't."

You have memory issues.

I'm a prescription drug addict.

I'm looking.

Benzos.

Yep, that will do it to you, I say.

I even got off them without seizures, but I have the memory problems.

Plus, I can't sleep.

I say, yes, I understand.

You need to get exercise.

Oh, I get plenty of exercise here. I have panic attacks.

I say, you hafta try to walk. Just as much as you can, so your body can relax.

Are you a doctor?

No, I'm a musician.

What kind of musician.

I'm a composer.

She's speaking very softly now, and I have to pull out my earplugs to hear her.

I need an arrangement of Ave Maria*, I don't like the one I have.

I say:Yeah, I wish I could help, but I don't compose music like that.

What kind of music do you compose

Oh, weird electronic stuff, but, (I can't explain) I try to make it pretty.

Her face is moving less, she's sort of collapsing into her grief.

My father was a doctor.

Oh, she's interested again.

Columbia medical school.

My father was a gay man.

Almost politely, her whole face moves from side to side, and she gasps.

That upsets you, I say.

Yes, she says.

Very softly, looking at me very hard. I don't need another ------ in my life.

What?

I don't need another hooligan in my life.

A customer is waiting.

Let him go, I say.

She says, wait.

I say, I can come in here and talk to you, and that's it. I can be a human being.

Wait, she says. I'm on from 6 to 9. Maybe you can come in tomorrow.

Don't worry, I say. I like you.

I'll see you tomorrow.

She'll remember me, a little tomorrow, but I don't know how much.

The glasses and her stillness and politeness make it hard for me to track her eyes.

So much pain in the world.


* not exactly, but something like this. I couldn't quite catch it with my earplugs in.

Last edited by calebprime; 10th March 2016 at 05:04 PM.
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Old 10th March 2016, 11:57 PM   #269
calebprime
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Nostalgia Tripping

this was posted maybe 10, 15 minutes after encounter.

3FX 813 Mass Plate. White vehicle

6 maybe 6-2

Semitic face, beard

Looking up at the clock at BHS rather obviously.

"Do you have a lighter?"

nope, sorry.

back around

he's at first lurking by aligning himself on bench with trees in shadows

me: Hey, I'm just curious, I saw you looking up at the clock.

him: Nostalgia (mumble)

me: what?

him: Nostalgia tripping

me: Sure, it's nice at night when it's quiet

him: I went to Brookline High School

me: How old are you?

him: 25

me: Are you an undercover cop?

him: laughs (with emb.) (seems genuine enough: maybe yes, maybe no)

"Do you have a lighter?"

me: nope. I'm a pot smoker, but not tonight.

him: laughs

I try to stay at least 25-30 feet away, keep moving.

Last edited by calebprime; 11th March 2016 at 12:38 AM.
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Old 11th March 2016, 12:23 AM   #270
calebprime
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Someday We'll All Meet -- S. King parody, screenplay

Note: He's no longer called : xxxxxx anything. No idea for name at present
Here called Protag.

Dream of his rival Roger Scroton and wife *********** mixed with logical notation somehow
The point here is to show the depth of his practice. Even if this isn't
true of philos., it's supposed to impress the audience.

Protag finds this erotic but maybe a little disturbing.

If explicit *********** is too much, then silly Ian-Fleming style, or
watered down St. King

"Chair" calls, it's 4:30 Am

-- the usual stirrings of wife, like in cop movies.

-- The Chair (really some sinister satanic figure) abrupt and a little strange-sounding
quantized typical of cell phone

you must substitute for x, who had a stroke at last min.
the class has been relocated, there was a burst pipe,
it's over in "building 11" -- this is left vague
- I'll download directions to your Iphone

brief skirm with wife,
she's feeling sexy but she pushes him away

he finds this sexy, too, but he has to get ready

she pulls down nightgown

Makes coffee, takes dog

Getting to the CVS

stomach cramps -- joint in ashtray

he tries to be careful, but his stomach hurts. He smokes
a little but it's the super powerful stuff. (note: cannabis as remedy for stomach pain)

flashback to going to dealer
dealer said two bags, one Diesal, one is fictional weed called "Son of Barger"
reference to Hell's Angel Sonny Barger. This has chemical adulterants made, coincidentally, or not, by
someone related to mad scientist, below.



Protag. didn't really track which was which
he smokes the wrong one and becomes more intox. than he wanted to.

things get weird on the way, with bad directions, fog, weed, dog

(dog must be character)


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma...63d75b380ea7de

We hear automated directions, such as: "Turn right in 400 feet, etc."

Down Main st.

bad weird directions, suppos. to Welles. as we go

nearly off the cliff.

dog freaking

back around

to road leading to old Polaroid, building 11.

Through fence

Sign outside

Down stairs

Students: Pojo and CP

Introductions, and funny speech by Protag: "I hold philos dear. Like a farmer holds the soil dear. Like
a Christian holds the bible dear".

They are hopeless. Every time he tries to ask hypothetical, they object on
concrete premise grounds

back story -- mad Polar. scientist, made crazy machine with whatever powers
This machine still sits, rusting but still dangerous in basement of Building 11

Protag's motivation -- to be passionate like his wife
His doubts about use of logic increased by sit. see note.

His chops must be tested.

Prime's motivation -- to impress an older man, or maybe to assimilate him.
His test is to be himself, not hurt others, but without corrosive shame, without self-reproach

Things get weirder -- this has to be filled in. I have no idea, at the moment.
Can't let this fail, because it's the transition to supernatural.

Most action takes place in old Polaroid building 11. (Which I explored with a flashlight, bleating.)

back at home, daughter is possessed (use There is Enough For All from Rabbit Hill)
She's snarling the lines.

As she does, -- back in Protag's house, with wife -- these critters and things manifest themselves horrifyingly, explicitly corresponding to what happens in building 11, so there is
always cross-cutting.

After this point, like S. King, things get shoddy, almost anything goes.

Final battle is Monty Hall variation but Protag must use power of love
and swimming ability to save dog -- those access ponds
He uses his logical chops, too -- he has faith in them

use the creepy abandoned concrete bunker you found

Prime and Protag sort of merge, trade places -- Prime has what Pro wants,
and v. v.

Then party -- prime, pojo, all the ghosts from the past.

there's cake, and a band.

mike gamble, mark lamper, mick goodrick, randy roos, plus Bill Stewart and C Mc B on bass.
-Too many chord virtuosos! (This is the point)


If this becomes a screenplay, I'd actually like these guys to play.
This is maybe as absurd as "Playboy Allstars".

There is enough for all -- some booze, some dope, some cake,
some sex, some family warmth, some pay, some sleep, some work, some brains, etc.
This is ironically true.

references: See:
-Last Chap. of Rabbit Hill.
-Steely Dan--Teahouse on the Tracks
-the movie Wonderboys
-some of my posts

-----
"There is enough for all" subplot --
a book they read to their daughter

they have to read it over and over and over again -- boredom and monotony of
parenthood

when things get horrible, she twists it and taunts them -- which
is truly horrible, like Exorcist.


Satan here is more female than male. Satan here is the way people use morality and logic to shame and control each other, etc. -- no deep point intended. Better if "Satan" is capable of androg. and logic-chopping.

Last edited by calebprime; 11th March 2016 at 12:34 AM.
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Old 11th March 2016, 01:14 AM   #271
calebprime
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I'm eating my lunch

6PH J60 another T vehicle, probably

Too funny: I motion for the guy in T 43 /1327 to roll down his windows:

I try to make nice. I see you guys out here, etc.

"I'm eating my lunch."

I see you guys out here for hours.

surly this time: a stupid man: "I'm eating my lunch."

Possibly, they're taught to respond with a canned phrase: Eating lunch/Nostalgia tripping.

A canned two-word phrase that is supposed to sum things up

All a bit too ready to the lips.

It's fine if there are undercovers. I'm just walking.

And, you don't **** with the Police. They're there, doing their jobs. (note correct use of they're, there, and their.)

Still, if the guy didn't seem like some union-busting goon or a gangster, "I'm eating my lunch" is too funny. No lunch in sight.

Last edited by calebprime; 11th March 2016 at 01:16 AM.
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Old 11th March 2016, 01:21 AM   #272
calebprime
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Originally Posted by calebprime View Post
Note: He's no longer called : xxxxxx anything. No idea for name at present
Here called Protag.

Dream of his rival Roger Scroton and wife *********** mixed with logical notation somehow
The point here is to show the depth of his practice. Even if this isn't
true of philos., it's supposed to impress the audience.

Protag finds this erotic but maybe a little disturbing.

If explicit *********** is too much, then silly Ian-Fleming style, or
watered down St. King

"Chair" calls, it's 4:30 Am

-- the usual stirrings of wife, like in cop movies.

-- The Chair (really some sinister satanic figure) abrupt and a little strange-sounding
quantized typical of cell phone

you must substitute for x, who had a stroke at last min.
the class has been relocated, there was a burst pipe,
it's over in "building 11" -- this is left vague
- I'll download directions to your Iphone

brief skirm with wife,
she's feeling sexy but she pushes him away

he finds this sexy, too, but he has to get ready

she pulls down nightgown

Makes coffee, takes dog

Getting to the CVS

stomach cramps -- joint in ashtray

he tries to be careful, but his stomach hurts. He smokes
a little but it's the super powerful stuff. (note: cannabis as remedy for stomach pain)

flashback to going to dealer
dealer said two bags, one Diesal, one is fictional weed called "Son of Barger"
reference to Hell's Angel Sonny Barger. This has chemical adulterants made, coincidentally, or not, by
someone related to mad scientist, below.



Protag. didn't really track which was which
he smokes the wrong one and becomes more intox. than he wanted to.

things get weird on the way, with bad directions, fog, weed, dog

(dog must be character)


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma...63d75b380ea7de

We hear automated directions, such as: "Turn right in 400 feet, etc."

Down Main st.

bad weird directions, suppos. to Welles. as we go

nearly off the cliff.

dog freaking

back around

to road leading to old Polaroid, building 11.

Through fence

Sign outside

Down stairs

Students: Pojo and CP

Introductions, and funny speech by Protag: "I hold philos dear. Like a farmer holds the soil dear. Like
a Christian holds the bible dear".

They are hopeless. Every time he tries to ask hypothetical, they object on
concrete premise grounds

back story -- mad Polar. scientist, made crazy machine with whatever powers
This machine still sits, rusting but still dangerous in basement of Building 11

Protag's motivation -- to be passionate like his wife
His doubts about use of logic increased by sit. see note.

His chops must be tested.

Prime's motivation -- to impress an older man, or maybe to assimilate him.
His test is to be himself, not hurt others, but without corrosive shame, without self-reproach

Things get weirder -- this has to be filled in. I have no idea, at the moment.
Can't let this fail, because it's the transition to supernatural.

Most action takes place in old Polaroid building 11. (Which I explored with a flashlight, bleating.)

back at home, daughter is possessed (use There is Enough For All from Rabbit Hill)
She's snarling the lines.

As she does, -- back in Protag's house, with wife -- these critters and things manifest themselves horrifyingly, explicitly corresponding to what happens in building 11, so there is
always cross-cutting.

After this point, like S. King, things get shoddy, almost anything goes.

Final battle is Monty Hall variation but Protag must use power of love
and swimming ability to save dog -- those access ponds
He uses his logical chops, too -- he has faith in them

use the creepy abandoned concrete bunker you found

Prime and Protag sort of merge, trade places -- Prime has what Pro wants,
and v. v.

Then party -- prime, pojo, all the ghosts from the past.

there's cake, and a band.

mike gamble, mark lamper, mick goodrick, randy roos, plus Bill Stewart and C Mc B on bass.
-Too many chord virtuosos! (This is the point)


If this becomes a screenplay, I'd actually like these guys to play.
This is maybe as absurd as "Playboy Allstars".

There is enough for all -- some booze, some dope, some cake,
some sex, some family warmth, some pay, some sleep, some work, some brains, etc.
This is ironically true.

references: See:
-Last Chap. of Rabbit Hill.
-Steely Dan--Teahouse on the Tracks
-the movie Wonderboys
-some of my posts

-----
"There is enough for all" subplot --
a book they read to their daughter

they have to read it over and over and over again -- boredom and monotony of
parenthood

when things get horrible, she twists it and taunts them -- which
is truly horrible, like Exorcist.


Satan here is more female than male. Satan here is the way people use morality and logic to shame and control each other, etc. -- no deep point intended. Better if "Satan" is capable of androg. and logic-chopping.

some notes about my background motives, etc.

--I think this is really important.

--I think that we could collaborate without agreeing, necessarily.

--I pledge that I will hold off until you take your time, read this, and get back to me.

--I'd like the final product to accomplish all of the hidden agendas and more, plus being a fun thing for you to contribute to.

--I don't usually understand what I'm about until after I start generating material, then I think about it.

-- I won't stab you in the back, I'm actually nice in my weird way. but

-- I don't want this to read, in the end, entirely like some trains-from-different directions logic problem


Over and out for tonight.

I'm going to practice some scales.

Not as much fun as writing words.


NOT-SO-HIDDEN AGENDAS



1-- to show that sex is explicit and weird for everyone, but that gay sex has been singled out unfairly.
- to show this without saying it obviously

What is my passion here: My father's life story --

2-- to show that hypomania can be useful and creative, but not necessarily dangerous,

What is my passion here: My life story and Alice Flaherty's


3-- to show -- maybe, *NEW IDEA* that neurology or brain is really the fund. reality, that is, gross physical changes to brain completely change the person,
that people are really "bundles" rather than "essences"

What is my passion here: -------------. which he denies

4-- to show that the literature we know is funny and cheesy (cheap)

a. -King, Fleming

What is my passion here: I enjoy a song like Paperback Writer by the Beatles, and I'd love to be able to churn out something like King or Fleming


5--to show that musicians actually are intelligent and write songs that you can
actually think about and benefit from

What is my passion here: People crap on musicians, call them stupid,
because they CAN. All the time.

This relates to title: Someday We'll All Meet at the End of the Street -- this comes from Steely Dan song.






6-- to show why I love Nietzsche

What is my passion: He was misunderstood. He really was writing
a kind of confessional introspective speculative psychology

and he, right or wrong,

thought philosophers were actually doing that too, even if they didn't admit it.

7 -- to show that we can do something different with this "message board"
I use scare quotes because that's what people call it, esp. if they
want to define it as something not very profound or really very important


8-- to show that Woody Allen-style humor has a real bite or,
to draw on that kind of deflationary humor:

Eric Zimmerman used to have a Woody Allen-Style sense
of humor, but unlike Allen, he was actually really smart, academically

9 -- to fake people out on this board, by making it seem for a moment
that the writer of this story actually commands logical notation

What is my passion: To show that simple trickery can work

10 -- to work with you

W i m p: To enjoy this, to open up what is usually solitary and lonely


11 -- to endulge myself in the pleasure of recalling the Polaroid building and grounds
which brings back delightful memories of that time


12 -- to have a cannabis-consuming character

W i m p: To decry the treatment of cannabis smokers

comment: Sure, the stuff isn't really good for you, but you're going to die anyway,
and the fact that it's not that good for you isn't a reason to put people in jail, as has been done. a lot. with tragic consequences.

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Old 11th March 2016, 02:29 AM   #273
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Badge #? 135 The short one who did all the talking

license? 55

We have a cordial exchange of views.

I find this line particularly amusing: "We just stopped because we thought you were trying to get our attention."

The fine line between double bind...

I should carry girl-scout cookies and offer them. Or would that be a federal case.

I did mention that I was 58, so I like to walk near my own home.

Walking while weird: It's not a crime, it's a feature.

The younger one on my left contemplated me with what I'd call friendly amusement.

They stand maybe 8 to 10 feet away.

Eventually, I will have met everyone.

Oh, of course. In final party scene at Building 11, Polaroid, etc., the cops are invited, and they come.

But they have to remain in uniform.

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Old 11th March 2016, 02:43 AM   #274
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Oh, I forgot.

In my encounter with the lady.

It should have been obvious.

She asks what my name is.

"Caleb"

"That's a biblical name".

"But I'm not religious".

And I see her disappointment.

She's drowning, from the benzos, and she's reaching out to her religion to save her. That's why she wanted me to compose that Ave Maria, or whatever it was.

I can wave from a few feet away, but I can't really help her, except by being decent.
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Old 11th March 2016, 06:42 AM   #275
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This piece of mine, a sound collage of sounds in Brighton, mostly heard from the top of Nottinghill Road, is one of the best things I've ever done.

Hard to get people to understand that.

But there's some awesome chanting.

And something else I'd almost forgotten: How incredibly gifted and willing the NEC students were, when they understood your idea.

say no more

https://app.box.com/s/1zn6xnyww01b3z6rl6w9i3e6p62o7sk0

Maybe start 4 minutes in, just to hear it climax.

On the huge billboard leading down to Brighton Center at the time:

WE WANT MOSIACH NOW

It's weird about the 3rd-rate composer thing. True, but here I just let everything I could record from the top of the hill, and a little bit of myself, in.

How great it is to come back to this, and have it sound good to me.

So good, to hear that crazy laugh, to hear her whisper hold me tight...


https://www.google.com/maps/place/33...bc8b7d9fcbab36

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Old 11th March 2016, 01:24 PM   #276
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Steve Gadd and the separation of fact and value

I saw Gadd play in the pit doing The Capeman.

At first, I thought maybe something was terribly wrong.

The music sounded perfect.

His head was held at a strange angle, as if supported by some invisible pulley.

The rest of his body -- his arms, legs, all moved independently of each other.

There was no emotion whatsoever in his body language. No need.

It was at an extreme end of music to be heard, and not to be seen.

A pro's pro.
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Old 11th March 2016, 02:14 PM   #277
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The Essential Paul Burdick

Lee Hyla: "Glad to see you and Paul are on the same page!"

Heh.

-Paul had so many good lines that I've stolen that I probably mimic him every day.

-A certain Flower on Burdick: "You never know whether it's Paul or the Prozac talking."

-The incident of the melted socket. The socket was smoking, outside of Paul's office, which was, in AC terms, just upstream from my studio.

I'm a pro, or fancy myself one. In 15 years of running a studio, I've never had a single problem with currents or wiring or gear.

Paul, on the other hand, loved to collect bric a brac. He had red-velvet theater crowd-control thingies -- like you used to find at the movies. He had a funky old lamp with a short in it.

He cared more about the charms of the lamp than he did about the short.

As a result, the goons at Building Ops were ready to descend on me, thinking it was my fault, and the kiddies were just out of control. They even proposed -- get this -- that I make an explicit wiring diagram of the gear in the NEC studio, and they themselves would do the work of assembling it.

If you can understand why that's just a really, really, really stupid idea, hats off. I'm outta here.

Paul and I both had funky feet. I have a 35-year old case of athlete's foot, incurable except maybe by Lamisil.

I believe in short-term, topical remedies, vetted by the 10-year rule. Never the latest nor the greatest when it comes to meds.

I was right about Prilosec, and maybe about Lamisil. We'll see.

I have no idea whether this site is dependable, and I don't care.

http://www.sterishoe.com/foot-care-b...s-on-the-rise/
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Old 11th March 2016, 02:22 PM   #278
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Garfein

I'd get down on my knees and suck your cock any time you like.

How come the right side of your brain is hurtin'?


-- More Kreek's notebook
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Old 11th March 2016, 04:27 PM   #279
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Fox

Here's one about Fox.

I wrote a piece, let's say the quarter is 120-ish.

The meter was 11, with a triplet feel.

So, 11 x 3 is 33 attacks per bar. We've got 33 going.

Then, I divided the bar into 2's progressively: 2, 4, 8, 16, 32.

So now we have 33 against 32 at 120.

This was all happening in the background texture, though. Not the melody.

At this tempo, (120), 33 against 32 won't sound like two independent tempos, but more like one fuzzy tempo where the two parts are sort of gradually slipping apart, or sort of phasing.

Fox heard that.

The only one.

I once described in laborious detail to Lili's father this 33 to 32 thing, but he mistook my point.

"I'm sorry it got screwed up like that."

Sigh.
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Old 11th March 2016, 04:45 PM   #280
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Cory Eisenberg, Lewis, and Mark Lambert

I roomed with Mark Lampariello on the 3rd floor for a while.

Mark could already chord amazingly well.

Each floor in the old Berklee hotel had a different personality.

The 3rd floor was the "scholarly" floor, according to Lewis.

Lewis was up on the, I think, 8th floor.

He had achieved something difficult, something that took great labor and persistence. He had managed to cover every single square inch of his dorm room with hard core porn of its time -- Hustler, I think, was a favorite.

Lewis loved to tease me from his record-store job, later. "Welcome to the big city!" he'd say. Or, "That's big-city living."

He studied with Banacos.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Banacos

I was once minding my own business in the hall-way of the dorm, after eating at the cafeteria. Lewis comes up to me, and grabs two of my fingers with one hand, two with the other, pulling them apart until it really began to hurt.

You don't **** with a musician's hands.

Gales of laughter from Lewis, who called me a faggot.

He eventually released my fingers.

I'd like to maybe get revenge for that, and only that, someday.

Maybe I could explain, in all sincerity, how much that upset me. Might work.

Cory was his friend, a nice guy and good player.

Seems I've been confused for a day or two about Mark's stage name.

Lampariello ----> Lambert

"I'm bringing out the soup now, so play something they won't dance to." -- A favorite line of mine from one of his pieces.

Oh, and from the same piece: "Figures the musicians are too stupid to come in out of the rain" was another.

It might have been a sort of Stan Mack Real Life Funnies thing. Great piece.

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