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Old 10th December 2019, 04:32 PM   #1
wasapi
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That book that you reread?

There are not too many books I will reread, but I have some. Of course there are a couple of books of poetry, Mainly Galway Kinnell , Dorthey Parker, some in Portuguese.

The books, A Hundred Years of Solitude, some old Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler books, are all I can think of now, but I know there are others.

You?
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Old 10th December 2019, 04:43 PM   #2
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The Sherlock Holmes stories.
Alas Babylon by Pat Frank.
Most anything by H. Beam Piper.
A. Bertram Chandlers' Rim Worlds stories, but only the early ones, and about once a decade.

Last edited by Pope130; 10th December 2019 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 10th December 2019, 04:55 PM   #3
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How can you reread a book when you already know the ending?

Is what I used to hear a lot, from people who found out I did that. And didn't read for pleasure.

It's been a long time since I reread a book but I still have quite a stack of unread stuff to get to. I'm just getting to some comics that have been in my boxes since about 2002. (I used to buy a lot of them.) It is slightly amusing to come across an ad for a new comtemporary computer or video game system and see how little memory it holds.

The last book I remember rereading is perhaps The Tripods Trilogy.
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Old 10th December 2019, 04:58 PM   #4
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Harry Potter.
Lord of the Rings. (also The Hobbit and The Silmarillion)

In fact, I lost count of the number of times I had reread LoTR by the time I was fourteen.
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Old 10th December 2019, 05:00 PM   #5
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A 1932 print of The Bounty trilogy, the US and British versions of the HHttG by Douglas Adams, all the Mission Earth books at least thrice, several by Umberto Eco and Tom Clancy.

Not exactly the most intellectual stuff out there but it was what held my interests.

My wife reads poetry of the past century and it repels me in two pages. Mostly Mexican poets.

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Old 10th December 2019, 05:03 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
There are not too many books I will reread, but I have some. Of course there are a couple of books of poetry, Mainly Galway Kinnell , Dorthey Parker, some in Portuguese.

The books, A Hundred Years of Solitude, some old Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler books, are all I can think of now, but I know there are others.

You?
There are virtually no books I do NOT re-read. Obviously that's just me. I probably read The Lord Of The Rings ten times in ten years. But haven't in quite a while, perhaps I'll do that. I'm currently halfway through the third of the Brother Cadfael series. For the fifth or sixth time.

I used to read a lot of SF, but not much any more. I've done all of Discworld at least twice in a couple of years. I read and re-read a lot of naval historical fiction, having been hooked on it by Hornblower years ago.
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Old 10th December 2019, 05:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
How can you reread a book when you already know the ending?

Is what I used to hear a lot, from people who found out I did that. And didn't read for pleasure.
The answer, of course, is that you can see a lot of the foreshadowing stuff that you missed before. In the Brother Cadfael I'm now re-reading, Monk's Hood, the motive is a dispute over a manor. There have been several hints about the key fact that the manor is in Wales, but it hasn't come out yet.

And there's always other stuff you've missed. I know a lot more about 18th/19th century sailing warships now than when I first read Hornblower. Of course, that's not always a good thing -- I spot mistakes by the authors that went by me before.
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Old 10th December 2019, 05:11 PM   #8
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A lot. You generally get a lot more from multiple reads.

Certainly my favourite authors I will re-read many times out of sheer pleasure. Terry Pratchett, Isaac Asimov, Ursula LeGuin, Anne McCaffrey, Patrick O'Brian, Carol O'Connell, Laurie King, Charles Dickens, William Horwood. I could go on
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Old 10th December 2019, 05:22 PM   #9
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I used to reread LOTR on a regular basis. At some point, I realized I'd finally read it enough.

I've re-read Iain Banks's main Culture sequence at least once. I'll probably go back to it at least once more. Speaking of Banks, reading his later family dramas always felt like I was re-reading The Crow Road.

I re-read most of what I consider "peak Stephen King" every few years. What I think of as the "Castle Rock" period. It, Tommyknockers, Pet Sematary, The Shining. You know, the good stuff. I re-read the early Dark Tower stuff at least once, building up to the publication of the final books. But once I'd been through the door at the top of the tower... Never again.

Lately I've been working my way through a lot of the 60s crime authors. The working writers who cranked out a genre novel or two a year to pay the bills. Those all kinda feel like re-reading the same story, since they're pretty formulaic and try not to evolve the main character out of a moneymaking state.
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Old 10th December 2019, 05:56 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I used to reread LOTR on a regular basis. At some point, I realized I'd finally read it enough.
Heretic! There is no such thing as too much LoTR!
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Old 10th December 2019, 06:00 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Heretic! There is no such thing as too much LoTR!
Moderation in all things.

After you've read it ten times in ten years. After you've read it so many times you've read all the passages you used to skip or skim. After you've read it so many times that you're skipping or skimming the passages you used to look forward to reading. After that? Maybe it's time to give it a rest for a decade or two. Let it steep in the recesses of your memory long enough for the familiarity to fade, and for something new to hopefully shake loose.
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Old 10th December 2019, 06:19 PM   #12
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Recently, the only book series I reread was David Weber's Safehold.

I had originally read the series up to volume 9 some years ago, so when I bought volume 10, I refreshed my memory of 1-9!

So, OK not a complete reread...
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Old 10th December 2019, 07:50 PM   #13
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Any book I liked reading I like enough to re-read. I still have most of my best books I had in childhood, reading them is like visiting old friends. I cannot imagine not reading a good book repeatedly.
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Old 10th December 2019, 07:59 PM   #14
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London Fields by Martin Amis, four or five times. I know the story of course, but Amis, IMHO is a master of language and structure, and there is a heap of dark humour.
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Old 10th December 2019, 08:43 PM   #15
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Iíve been rereading books I read as a kid. For example: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory/Great Glass Elevator; IT; On a Pale Horse, Xanth Series (Piers Anthony). Thatís been a recent kick just to see how my adult mind might catch things I didnít back then.

I have reread almost every book by Harlan Coben; mostly because I really enjoyed them while reading them but then found that I couldnít remember them. I donít know why that is; it only happens with Coben. Must be something about his writing style.
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Old 10th December 2019, 09:55 PM   #16
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I've reread some of the classics, including just about everything by Shakespeare, and everything by Jane Austen. A few Vonneguts, after a very long period. A few Conrads. The Secret Agent and Victory are favorites and I think I've read those three or four times over the last 50 years. A couple I've read multiple times, not for the plot but for the language, include Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker, and Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities. I'm not sure short story collections quite qualify, but I've reread a fair amount of Donald Barthelme, Raymond Carver, Angela Carter, I.B. Singer, V.S. Pritchett, and others. Most of those stories are not the sort of thing where you forget the plot as there may not be one really, but want to refresh your memory on how they said it. Oh, and Saki. Gotta read the best of Saki a few times in a lifetime.
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Old 10th December 2019, 10:46 PM   #17
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World War Z
Snow Crash
Baroque Cycle
Warbreaker
Accelerando
... from the fiction side of my bookshelf
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Old 10th December 2019, 11:16 PM   #18
arthwollipot
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Moderation in all things.

After you've read it ten times in ten years. After you've read it so many times you've read all the passages you used to skip or skim. After you've read it so many times that you're skipping or skimming the passages you used to look forward to reading. After that? Maybe it's time to give it a rest for a decade or two. Let it steep in the recesses of your memory long enough for the familiarity to fade, and for something new to hopefully shake loose.
Now that somebody mentioned fiction, a thought occurred to me. The above is how I feel about nonfiction books. The Blind Watchmaker, for example. I feel that I have already learned everything I can from that book, and no longer feel the desire to reread it.

But fiction? Fiction is like art. I can go back to a beautiful painting again and again and appreciate its beauty. I can listen to a great piece of music again and again. And I can read LoTR again and again without getting tired of it. In fact, my appreciation of a work of art can actually deepen with familiarity.

That's the difference. Not trying to imply that your thoughts on the subject are any less valid (and I hope it is clear that my "heretic!" quip was a joke) but that's how it works in my mind.
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Old 11th December 2019, 12:12 AM   #19
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I've re-read Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Taylor, Nick Hornby, Ian McEwan, Daphne Du Maurier and Iris Murdoch quite a few times and a couple of other Elizabeths (names escape me). I revisit classics now and then such as Mill on the Floss, the Brontes and Catcher in the Rye. I love Jack Kerouac and often reread Dharma Bums , likewise Kurt Vonnegut Junior Cat's Cradle and Breakfast of Champions.

Oh and Kazuo Ishiguro, a British-Japanese author whose parents are from Nagasaki so we get the Japanese viewpoint of Pearl Harbour. He is a very fine writer.
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Old 11th December 2019, 12:26 AM   #20
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I have reread many, many books. One of the benefits of re-reading is actually because the story doesn't come as much of a surprise, you can see what the writer was doing and understand how the story was put together. The first time through I mostly read for plot.

Another benefit is that you come at stories differently at different ages. When you're older you may start to pick up things that you might have missed because you hadn't had the life experiences yet.

I will happily reread any PG Wodehouse books, because of course the plot is not the point with Plum--it's the language which still manages to surprise me. I reread Doestoyevsky because it is the little dialogues in his stories which are so prescient about what would happen later in the real world.
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Old 11th December 2019, 01:25 AM   #21
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Everything I have by Heinlein, which is to say pretty much everything. I have lost count how many times I have read Stranger. First the original release, then the extended edition. I also find all his juveniles bar the first one (Rocketship Gallileo) very easy to read and entertaining enough to browse through multiple times. Double Star, Door into Summer, even some of his '80's stuff, specifically Friday, Job and To Sail Beyond the Sunset.



John Wyndham as well. Day of the Triffids, Trouble with Lichen, The Midwich Cuckoos, Web, his short story collections, particularly Consider Her Ways. Douglas Adams (I am re-reading the first Dirk Gently book at the moment.



Mainstream stuff: Catch 22, Mila 18, Exodus (not the Bible one), A High Wind in Jamaica, To Kill A Mockingbird. Ben Elton stuff. Popcorn, STARK. The Hunger Games trilogy. Too much more to remember right now, and lots of non fiction as well, with Mick Foley's autobiographical books at the top of the tree.


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Old 11th December 2019, 02:42 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by fromdownunder View Post
Everything I have by Heinlein, which is to say pretty much everything. I have lost count how many times I have read Stranger.
For me it's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, which I must have read a dozen times, closely followed by The Number of the Beast.
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Old 11th December 2019, 03:57 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Pope130 View Post
The Sherlock Holmes stories.
Alas Babylon by Pat Frank.
Most anything by H. Beam Piper.
A. Bertram Chandlers' Rim Worlds stories, but only the early ones, and about once a decade.
We have similar tastes. Though there's a new-ish ABC out.
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Old 13th December 2019, 07:53 AM   #24
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The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

The Falco series by Lindsey Davies

Iain Banks (or Iain M. Banks if we are going sci-fi)
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Old 14th December 2019, 06:40 AM   #25
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Quite a lot, really. LOTR, Gene Wolf’s New Sun and Long Sun, lots of Jack Vance...
William Gibson, the Sprawl and Bridge trilogies....
Greg Bear, the Forge/Anvil novels...
Roger Zelazney, Nine Princes in Amber...
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Old 14th December 2019, 08:49 AM   #26
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I end up re-reading most of mine, at least since I started on eBooks. I have about 950 titles now. When I get bored, I'll start browsing through until I find one I haven't read in a while. Most are fantasy and sci-fi, a few thrillers/mysteries. I need to dig for all my physical books; they're still in containers in the garage. I used to buy a lot while in the Army; easy to put a paperback in a cargo pocket to read while out in the field.
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Old 14th December 2019, 10:34 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
There are virtually no books I do NOT re-read. Obviously that's just me. I probably read The Lord Of The Rings ten times in ten years. But haven't in quite a while, perhaps I'll do that. I'm currently halfway through the third of the Brother Cadfael series. For the fifth or sixth time.



I used to read a lot of SF, but not much any more. I've done all of Discworld at least twice in a couple of years. I read and re-read a lot of naval historical fiction, having been hooked on it by Hornblower years ago.
It is quite strange, I hardly ever watch movies more than once from choice but I can read any book over and over.

I also still have all the books I have ever owned since I was around 9. Unfortunately storage of books has been a perennial issue (I have thousands and thousands) and I have boxes and boxes of books in the attic, stuffed under beds, piled double deep on shelving and boxes in my outhouse. That means I can't get to them easily but there will be books in amongst those that I have read dozens of times.

Since I've become Kindled the storage problem has abated and I have quite a few PD texts that I have in physical books and in a week probably re read one or two of my back catalogue.
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Old 14th December 2019, 10:43 AM   #28
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I've tried to think of any well known or major authors that I haven't read more than once. I think the only significant one is the Wandering Jew (by Sue) which is the most boring book in existence and the only book I have ever considered giving up on.

Oh hold on there are a few others, ones that come to mind are any Austin novels and Charles Dickens novels, I find them all to be tedious.
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Old 15th December 2019, 07:18 AM   #29
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Herbertís Dune
Orwellís 1984
A lot of Lovecraftís stories

Reading through the above entries it becomes obvious to me to revisit Heinleinís Stranger in a Strange Land.
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Old 15th December 2019, 11:17 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
It is quite strange, I hardly ever watch movies more than once from choice but I can read any book over and over.

I also still have all the books I have ever owned since I was around 9. Unfortunately storage of books has been a perennial issue (I have thousands and thousands) and I have boxes and boxes of books in the attic, stuffed under beds, piled double deep on shelving and boxes in my outhouse. That means I can't get to them easily but there will be books in amongst those that I have read dozens of times.

Since I've become Kindled the storage problem has abated and I have quite a few PD texts that I have in physical books and in a week probably re read one or two of my back catalogue.
Fancy that ! we have something in common after all. I too have something in the region of thousands of books. About 95% of them are non fiction and the fiction books I have are all highbrow, Like Aldous Huxley and George Orwell and Herman Hesse. I have a large room with wall to wall bookcases full of books, and a load more books on the floor.
I keep my best books in the bedroom in another tall bookcase.
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Old 15th December 2019, 11:25 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
There are not too many books I will reread, but I have some. Of course there are a couple of books of poetry, Mainly Galway Kinnell , Dorthey Parker, some in Portuguese.

The books, A Hundred Years of Solitude, some old Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler books, are all I can think of now, but I know there are others.

You?
I re-read Bertrand Russell ' history of western philosophy' and Steven Hawking's ' brief history of time' in the last year. I am currently re-reading Fritjof Capra , ' the Tao of physics'.
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Even in the valley of the shadow of death two and two do not make six.
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Old 15th December 2019, 11:38 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Scorpion View Post
Fancy that ! we have something in common after all. I too have something in the region of thousands of books. About 95% of them are non fiction and the fiction books I have are all highbrow, Like Aldous Huxley and George Orwell and Herman Hesse. I have a large room with wall to wall bookcases full of books, and a load more books on the floor.
I keep my best books in the bedroom in another tall bookcase.
At least you are organized. My books are scattered everywhere. I started with one large bookcase, but soon they spilled over into almost every surface, even under the bed.
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Old 15th December 2019, 12:54 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
It is quite strange, I hardly ever watch movies more than once from choice but I can read any book over and over.

I also still have all the books I have ever owned since I was around 9. Unfortunately storage of books has been a perennial issue (I have thousands and thousands) and I have boxes and boxes of books in the attic, stuffed under beds, piled double deep on shelving and boxes in my outhouse. That means I can't get to them easily but there will be books in amongst those that I have read dozens of times.

Since I've become Kindled the storage problem has abated and I have quite a few PD texts that I have in physical books and in a week probably re read one or two of my back catalogue.
When we consolidated from two houses to just the smaller of the two about five years ago, the storage problem became acute. I wound up donating the majority to Goodwill Industries. When I dropped them off, the guy said "We LOVE books!" That made me feel a little better, and in fact the whole thing didn't hurt as much as I expected.
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Old 15th December 2019, 03:40 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
There are not too many books I will reread, but I have some. Of course there are a couple of books of poetry, Mainly Galway Kinnell , Dorthey Parker, some in Portuguese.

The books, A Hundred Years of Solitude, some old Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler books, are all I can think of now, but I know there are others.

You?
I don't read Portuguese, but if you like Portuguese poets, I hope you have run into Fernando Pessoa.
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Old 16th December 2019, 12:51 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Hellbound View Post
I end up re-reading most of mine, at least since I started on eBooks. I have about 950 titles now. When I get bored, I'll start browsing through until I find one I haven't read in a while. Most are fantasy and sci-fi, a few thrillers/mysteries. I need to dig for all my physical books; they're still in containers in the garage. I used to buy a lot while in the Army; easy to put a paperback in a cargo pocket to read while out in the field.
On the E-books thing, I always remember the scene in the Time Machine where Rod Taylor discovers the rotting books in the library and comments about how it explains so much. I thought it would make a great Kindle ad to have a digitized Yvette Mimieux reply, "Oh, your civilization still reads books made from dead trees?"
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Old 16th December 2019, 10:46 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
I don't read Portuguese, but if you like Portuguese poets, I hope you have run into Fernando Pessoa.
Thanks so much for the introduction of Pessoa. He is a brilliant poet!
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Old 18th December 2019, 08:01 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
When we consolidated from two houses to just the smaller of the two about five years ago, the storage problem became acute. I wound up donating the majority to Goodwill Industries. When I dropped them off, the guy said "We LOVE books!" That made me feel a little better, and in fact the whole thing didn't hurt as much as I expected.
Doesn't compute. Give a book away? That breaches the fundamental narrative of reality!
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Old 18th December 2019, 08:02 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by wasapi View Post
Thanks so much for the introduction of Pessoa. He is a brilliant poet!
Brilliant poet?

An oxymoron if I've ever seen one.
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Old 18th December 2019, 08:06 AM   #39
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I got rid of stacks of books over the last few years. Mostly large-format coffee table books I'd kept around for reference. I got most of them before the internet was the major photo reference source.

So why did I just have to buy another bookcase?! This one's going in the basement to hold the rest of the art, music, and reference books I'd had stacked up in various places.
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Old 18th December 2019, 08:42 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
Doesn't compute. Give a book away? That breaches the fundamental narrative of reality!
No, it's technically possible to give a book away and never see it again; it goes by the term "lending".

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