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Old 4th January 2018, 03:10 PM   #121
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Originally Posted by rustypouch View Post
The density of baking ingredients is not always consistent, which is why bakers use weight. Flour is compressible, as is brown sugar. Salt varies based on crystal size. Eggs are not always the same size. These small variations affect the ratios of ingredients, and can have a noticeable effect on the final product.
I first learned of this when I worked in a commercial kitchen. The baker came in at night to do all the baking and we would occasionally drop by to chat, eat leftovers and hang out. He said something about needing so many pounds of water but was measuring with a large liquid vessel. No problem, water is 8.3 pounds per gallon. The variance based on temperature is too slight to impact a huge vat of biscuits.

Then he did the same for some flour. I was so confused, he said he had the conversions down in his head and didn't need to use the scale. This made no sense to me at the time. I figured that weight was used for the reasons you give above and his conversions, especially doing them on the fly surely added in some error. But, he was nice enough to let us hang out in the kitchen when we really didn't have anywhere else to hang out, so I didn't bother him about it.

Later I was thinking about this while teaching my kids how to bake and I figured it out: He wasn't a very good baker.
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Old 4th January 2018, 05:17 PM   #122
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Originally Posted by Thor 2 View Post
So now this has morphed into a thread about cooking.

There are worse things it could morph into.
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Old 4th January 2018, 07:38 PM   #123
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Originally Posted by Thor 2 View Post
Well yes the Gram or Kilogram is a unit of mass and strictly speaking we should measure weight in Newtons - it being the force needed to resist our gravitational pull.
Part of the confusion is the pound is actually a unit of force (the FPS unit of mass is the "slug" which has a weight of 32.2 pounds on earth's surface).

When Australia went metric, people who said "I weigh 10 stones (140 lbs)" were suddenly expected to say "I have a mass of 63.5 kg". This change in nomenclature didn't really take. I understand that there is an unofficial unit of weight known as the "kilogram-weight" which is the same as 9.8 N.
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Old 4th January 2018, 07:52 PM   #124
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One of the few legit issues the Metric system does have is that since the system is exact it's scales and ranges are more universal and therefore don't always line up with real world ranges. A person is going to be more familer on an emotional level with the ranges of most of the Imperial scales than the metric.

Like in Fahrenheit 0 degree is cold. 100 degrees is hot.

In Celsius 0 degrees is cold. 100 degrees is... you're dead.

Yeah we know intellectually that the second way makes more sense, it's tied to actual reproducible physical phenomena and not... well random nonsense but the first way feels... not better for at least different. Yeah I know that it's all human base-10 random arbitrary and meaningless I do think there's some part of psyche that does react better to 0 being a really cold temperature we can conceptualize and 100 being a really hot temperature we can conceptualize.
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Old 4th January 2018, 08:07 PM   #125
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
Like in Fahrenheit 0 degree is cold. 100 degrees is hot.

In Celsius 0 degrees is cold. 100 degrees is... you're dead.
Yes, one of the more regrettable consequences of switching from celcius to fahrenheit was the loss of the definition of a hot day. 37.8 C just doesn't sound the same as 100 F.

Fortunately, thanks to global warning, 40 C has become an acceptable replacement for the definition of a hot day.
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Old 5th January 2018, 12:20 AM   #126
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I thought it always was?

I learned the metric system in Sweden, and am slowly getting used to cooking with fractions of 2.5 dl. However, I still need my calculator to set the oven right.
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Old 5th January 2018, 02:20 AM   #127
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Originally Posted by alexi_drago View Post
huffpost area man uses basic math to work something out
Where is Huffpost area? Is it a suburb of London?
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Old 5th January 2018, 02:33 AM   #128
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
Like in Fahrenheit 0 degree is cold. 100 degrees is hot.

In Celsius 0 degrees is cold. 100 degrees is... you're dead.
Depends what you're measuring though. It may not make sense to you in terms of air temperature if your head works on a range of 0-100oF, but I am quite happy thinking of 0oC as 'cold' and 30oC as 'hot'. (or 40 - depending on where you are I guess, in the UK 30 is pretty damn hot)

But in Celsius water freezes at 0 and boils at 100 (depending on altitude)
In Fahrenheit water freezes at 32 and boils at 212. Not nice round numbers. (I don't think they need to be nice round numbers, but that's what is being discussed)

In passing, I would argue that for a lot of people, 0oF is a lot closer to 'you're dead' than just 'cold', but it depends what you're used to really
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Old 5th January 2018, 04:07 AM   #129
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Originally Posted by Worm View Post
Depends what you're measuring though. It may not make sense to you in terms of air temperature if your head works on a range of 0-100oF, but I am quite happy thinking of 0oC as 'cold' and 30oC as 'hot'. (or 40 - depending on where you are I guess, in the UK 30 is pretty damn hot)

But in Celsius water freezes at 0 and boils at 100 (depending on altitude)
In Fahrenheit water freezes at 32 and boils at 212. Not nice round numbers. (I don't think they need to be nice round numbers, but that's what is being discussed)

In passing, I would argue that for a lot of people, 0oF is a lot closer to 'you're dead' than just 'cold', but it depends what you're used to really
Agreed. It depends on what you grew up with. You have heuristics in your head that you know from experience (I can walk about 4km in an hour at a leisurely pace and a warm day is 27°) . I have no easily accessible idea of how far a mile is or how hot 97F is. I would have to convert to metric before I'd be able to appreciate the significance of that same number to someone who grew up abused (taught non-metric units)
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Old 5th January 2018, 05:27 AM   #130
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Most people here seem to ignore that the Fahrenheit scale was deliberately created after and based on Ole Rømer's scale (the Danish physicist who proved light has a speed and measured it -with a 25% error-) which intentionally chose to have positive numbers for freezing conditions in Northern countries so ignorant people wouldn't get baffled by negative temperatures.

If you were slightly above an ignorant animal, the typical "middle class" of those times, you would understand temperatures in Rømer and Fahrenheit's scales, and in the case the temperature turned to be negative, you would get baffled and understand you had no proper clothes to be outside all the day in such conditions.

What history shows is societies making an effort to educate their citizens into understanding negative numbers and abandoning wacky scales, while other societies, like Belize, still embrace and cherish such ignorance.

BTUs? Are you kidding me?
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Old 5th January 2018, 05:54 AM   #131
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Originally Posted by Octavo View Post
. I would have to convert to metric before I'd be able to appreciate the significance of that same number to someone who grew up abused (taught non-metric units)
You don't understand what it's like to grow up abused because us non-metric people deigned to save your asses.
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Old 5th January 2018, 06:15 AM   #132
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In the book About the Size of it by Warwick Cairns the author argues convincingly and entertainingly that the older units - pound, inch, foot, pint, and so on, are more natural 'human scale' units and easier for people to work with in every day situations.

I think the advantages of consistent powers-of-ten multipliers instead of having to remember numbers like 12, 14, 16, 22, 220, 1760, 5280, etc. tips the advantage in favour of the metric system (even though I remember the numbers anyway as I have to work with both systems). Even if you don't agree with the author's conclusion, the book is still an interesting and educating read - I recommend it.
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Old 5th January 2018, 06:36 AM   #133
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Originally Posted by Dr. Keith View Post
Later I was thinking about this while teaching my kids how to bake and I figured it out: He wasn't a very good baker.
Not necessarily.

Bread is one of the quirks of baking where accurate measurements aren't required. They can actually work against you if the goal is a consistent end product.

The humidity of the room (and how much water is in your flour) the time of year the type of flour and a load of other variables can alter things that give rise to inconsistent results.

I worked as a baker for a couple of years at a high end hotel and while I weighed everything out the same each time at the end of the kneading process you still give the dough a pinch test and then you add more water/flour as appropriate until it looks and feels right. (Describing what it is that looks/feels right is notoriously difficult)

Lots of baking you need to be deadly accurate, bread notsomuch. If you're rushing you can eyeball ingredient quantities and get close and then correct things after kneading.


Oh and yes I weigh liquids in grams. Lots of liquids are close enough to water as to make no difference and for other liquids you just know that x ml = y grams. Egg white for example. I average sized egg white is 30g and about 33ml IIRC. Egg yolk is close enough to the density of water as to make no difference.
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Old 5th January 2018, 06:55 AM   #134
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
One of the few legit issues the Metric system does have is that since the system is exact it's scales and ranges are more universal and therefore don't always line up with real world ranges. A person is going to be more familer on an emotional level with the ranges of most of the Imperial scales than the metric.

Like in Fahrenheit 0 degree is cold. 100 degrees is hot.

In Celsius 0 degrees is cold. 100 degrees is... you're dead.

Yeah we know intellectually that the second way makes more sense, it's tied to actual reproducible physical phenomena and not... well random nonsense but the first way feels... not better for at least different. Yeah I know that it's all human base-10 random arbitrary and meaningless I do think there's some part of psyche that does react better to 0 being a really cold temperature we can conceptualize and 100 being a really hot temperature we can conceptualize.
For at least 90% of Humanity, you are wrong.
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:00 AM   #135
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Originally Posted by Ambrosia View Post
Not necessarily.

Bread is one of the quirks of baking where accurate measurements aren't required. They can actually work against you if the goal is a consistent end product.

The humidity of the room (and how much water is in your flour) the time of year the type of flour and a load of other variables can alter things that give rise to inconsistent results.

I worked as a baker for a couple of years at a high end hotel and while I weighed everything out the same each time at the end of the kneading process you still give the dough a pinch test and then you add more water/flour as appropriate until it looks and feels right. (Describing what it is that looks/feels right is notoriously difficult)

Lots of baking you need to be deadly accurate, bread notsomuch. If you're rushing you can eyeball ingredient quantities and get close and then correct things after kneading.


Oh and yes I weigh liquids in grams. Lots of liquids are close enough to water as to make no difference and for other liquids you just know that x ml = y grams. Egg white for example. I average sized egg white is 30g and about 33ml IIRC. Egg yolk is close enough to the density of water as to make no difference.
Another cautionary tale about using metric. You can't even use it to bake bread. Use the American system, our recipes always work for even the most epic explosions.
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:05 AM   #136
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Originally Posted by Senex View Post
You don't understand what it's like to grow up abused because us non-metric people deigned to save your asses.
Ah yes, because Germany was going so well in South Africa until the USA (already years late in joining the war) came in. And those 0 troops you sent there made such a huge difference. In fact South Africa had already won a total victory over German Southwest Africa (now Namibia) before the USA ever entered the war. And South Africa was never threatened with invasion in the second world war either (which you were also years late to). So shove it.
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:11 AM   #137
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Originally Posted by Damien Evans View Post
Ah yes, because Germany was going so well in South Africa until the USA (already years late in joining the war) came in. And those 0 troops you sent there made such a huge difference. In fact South Africa had already won a total victory over German Southwest Africa (now Namibia) before the USA ever entered the war. And South Africa was never threatened with invasion in the second world war either (which you were also years late to). So shove it.
We have grown immune to your non-appreciation.

You're welcome nonetheless.
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:22 AM   #138
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Okay look at it this way.

Why Celsius and not Kelvin?
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:51 AM   #139
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Exactly, because Plank's law is so important to common people in everyday life.

Imagine a house wife baking bread without direct use of Wien's!
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:55 AM   #140
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
Okay look at it this way.

Why Celsius and not Kelvin?
Why Celsius and not Hitler.

Perhaps these questions are above our pay grade.
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Old 5th January 2018, 08:41 AM   #141
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Originally Posted by ceptimus View Post
In the book About the Size of it by Warwick Cairns the author argues convincingly and entertainingly that the older units - pound, inch, foot, pint, and so on, are more natural 'human scale' units and easier for people to work with in every day situations.

I think the advantages of consistent powers-of-ten multipliers instead of having to remember numbers like 12, 14, 16, 22, 220, 1760, 5280, etc. tips the advantage in favour of the metric system (even though I remember the numbers anyway as I have to work with both systems). Even if you don't agree with the author's conclusion, the book is still an interesting and educating read - I recommend it.
I keep hearing this argument, and apart from ounces (which I do sometimes use in baking as often being easier to remember than near enough 30g), I think that the other units are similar enough in size, so that there's not much difference - unless you are mixing them, when metric wins - is 8-inches really that much easier to remember than 20cm? Is half a kilo/half a litre that much harder than a pound or just under half a UK pint?
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Old 5th January 2018, 10:35 AM   #142
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Originally Posted by jimbob View Post
I keep hearing this argument, and apart from ounces (which I do sometimes use in baking as often being easier to remember than near enough 30g), I think that the other units are similar enough in size, so that there's not much difference - unless you are mixing them, when metric wins - is 8-inches really that much easier to remember than 20cm? Is half a kilo/half a litre that much harder than a pound or just under half a UK pint?

"Easier" is the relative component here.

It really depends on how often you need to do it. People who only and always use metric units for common tasks find them much easier. People who only and always use Imperial (etc.) units find them much easier.

For people who find themselves in a situation where they need to use both or have to switch from one to the other it all depends on how regularly they have to do it. But it is the same thing. It depends on what they are used to.

Earlier in this thread there was a bit about decimal feet and I commented that it is pretty easy to convert back and forth from decimal feet to feet and inches in your head (to ~two significant decimal places). Part of that was because I did it on a daily basis, and it became automatic. Like being bilingual, I guess. If I thought about the quantity in one set of units then the other was just there, without giving it any extra thought.

No matter whether it is one or a couple of measurement systems, the ease of use is all about how often you use them.

And why.

Some are certainly more appropriate for particular applications than others. Metric wins for just about any scientific application, but most people aren't doing scientific applications.

Others are less clear. Radians, anyone? How about parsecs?

Why don't we use decimal hours? Is base 60 really all that much more sensible. For that matter, why hours?

If we were being really consistent about this whole metric thing we'd be talking about kiloseconds and megaseconds.

Or we could go with decimal days. You'd have a standard 0.333 workday.

Why twelve months in a year?

It's easy to brag on the things you are used to, and easier to flog the things you aren't, but most of us are working from a foundation of pure sand at some point. It's all relative.

Ships commonly used a day divided into six watches of four hours, and each watch was divided into eight bells of one half hour. The sailors didn't think in terms of minutes and hours so much as how many bells on each watch.

My grandparents had an old-style stand-up grandfather clock in their downstairs hallway that chimed in Westminster QuartersWP. (How obscure is that for modern youth?) I spent a lot of time there when I was a kid, and to this day, even though it's been nearly half a century ago that I stopped going there regularly, I still listen when I hear those notes, counting off what quarter hour it is.

There have been places in the not so distant past that commonly allowed twelve hours for each day and for each night, dawn to dusk, dusk to dawn, and the length of the hour changed with the seasons. Everyone was used to it, and thought anything else was a terrible idea.
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Old 5th January 2018, 10:44 AM   #143
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Originally Posted by quadraginta View Post
"Easier" is the relative component here.

It really depends on how often you need to do it. People who only and always use metric units for common tasks find them much easier. People who only and always use Imperial (etc.) units find them much easier.

For people who find themselves in a situation where they need to use both or have to switch from one to the other it all depends on how regularly they have to do it. But it is the same thing. It depends on what they are used to.

Earlier in this thread there was a bit about decimal feet and I commented that it is pretty easy to convert back and forth from decimal feet to feet and inches in your head (to ~two significant decimal places). Part of that was because I did it on a daily basis, and it became automatic. Like being bilingual, I guess. If I thought about the quantity in one set of units then the other was just there, without giving it any extra thought.

No matter whether it is one or a couple of measurement systems, the ease of use is all about how often you use them.

And why.

Some are certainly more appropriate for particular applications than others. Metric wins for just about any scientific application, but most people aren't doing scientific applications.

Others are less clear. Radians, anyone? How about parsecs?

Why don't we use decimal hours? Is base 60 really all that much more sensible. For that matter, why hours?

If we were being really consistent about this whole metric thing we'd be talking about kiloseconds and megaseconds.

Or we could go with decimal days. You'd have a standard 0.333 workday.

Why twelve months in a year?

It's easy to brag on the things you are used to, and easier to flog the things you aren't, but most of us are working from a foundation of pure sand at some point. It's all relative.

Ships commonly used a day divided into six watches of four hours, and each watch was divided into eight bells of one half hour. The sailors didn't think in terms of minutes and hours so much as how many bells on each watch.

There have been places in the not so distant past that commonly allowed twelve hours for each day and for each night, dawn to dusk, dusk to dawn, and the length of the hour changed with the seasons. Everyone was used to it, and thought anything else was a terrible idea.
I think that is sort of my point. With the proviso that at least one recipe I remember as being 6oz of everything and 5 eggs, which is marginally better than 180g of everything and 5 eggs.


I'm sure it is easier to remember one mile rather than 1.6 km, but equally it is easier to remember 1km rather than 5/8 of a mile (notice my utterly inconsistent use of fractions and decimals, which also says something).
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US 16.4% of GDP of which 48.2% is public expenditure - 7.9% of GDP is public spending
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Old 5th January 2018, 01:09 PM   #144
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Originally Posted by quadraginta View Post
My grandparents had an old-style stand-up grandfather clock in their downstairs hallway that chimed in Westminster QuartersWP. (How obscure is that for modern youth?)...
Thank you for that. Now I understand where they come the familiar sounds of one of Buenos Aires' landmarks, the Tower of the English (Always officially named "Torre Monumental", in spite what the WP article may say). This tower, the same as the Monument of the Spanish, was one of several monuments donated by local communities of expats during the Centennial.
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Old 5th January 2018, 03:41 PM   #145
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Originally Posted by psionl0 View Post
Part of the confusion is the pound is actually a unit of force (the FPS unit of mass is the "slug" which has a weight of 32.2 pounds on earth's surface).

When Australia went metric, people who said "I weigh 10 stones (140 lbs)" were suddenly expected to say "I have a mass of 63.5 kg". This change in nomenclature didn't really take. I understand that there is an unofficial unit of weight known as the "kilogram-weight" which is the same as 9.8 N.

Well not quite as simple as that. There are three approaches to the English units of mass, force, and weight.

When I studied engineering, as I mentioned ^, we used pounds as a unit of force in one subject and as a unit of mass in another. We then had slugs as a unit of mass and poundals as a unit of force correspondingly..... what a damn mess! No wonder the introduction of the metric system was welcome.

The value of "g" varies to a slight degree even on our mother planet, so you and objects will weigh slightly different values, depending on where you are. Scientists and engineers talk about mass because that stays the same.

Just to give an illustration of the logical simplicity of the metric system:

- The Metre is related to the circumference of the Earth - nominally 10,000,000 from the equator to one of the poles. The French measured/calculated this a couple of hundred years ago but were a bit out because the Earth is slightly flattened at the poles.

- 1 cubic Decimetre equals 1 Litre.

- The Gram is the mass of 1 cubic centimetre of water at a certain temperature. Hence 1 cubic Decimetre or Litre has a mass of 1 Kilogram (kG).

- The Newton is the force needed to accelerate a mass of 1 kg at a rate of 1 metre/sec/sec.

- The Pascal is a pressure of 1 Newton on one square Metre.

- The Joule is the energy needed to do the work of pushing with a force of 1 Newton for a distance of 1 Metre.

- The Watt is the unit of power and the rate of doing work at 1 Joule per second.

- And so on.

When you consider the corresponding imperil units and how they are defined you appreciate the simplicity and logic of the metric system
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Old 5th January 2018, 07:11 PM   #146
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Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
Thank you for that. Now I understand where they come the familiar sounds of one of Buenos Aires' landmarks, the Tower of the English (Always officially named "Torre Monumental", in spite what the WP article may say).
You should tell that to the City of Buenos Aires, their tourism web site says the same as Wikipedia, which is likely why Wikipedia has that information.
https://turismo.buenosaires.gob.ar/e...e-los-ingleses
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:02 AM   #147
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post

Like in Fahrenheit 0 degree is cold. 100 degrees is hot.

In Celsius 0 degrees is cold. 100 degrees is... you're dead.
I dunno. It strikes me that 0F (-18C) is more than merely cold, it's savagely cold. Given that Mr Fahrenheit worked in Holland - a temperate country - it doesn't seem likely that he chose that range based on regular personal experience.

"The lower defining point, 0 °F, was established as the temperature of a solution of brine made from equal parts of ice and salt. Further limits were established as the melting point of ice (32 °F) ..."
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:07 AM   #148
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Originally Posted by paulhutch View Post
You should tell that to the City of Buenos Aires, their tourism web site says the same as Wikipedia, which is likely why Wikipedia has that information.
https://turismo.buenosaires.gob.ar/e...e-los-ingleses
I'm 99.9% certain it's the other way around. The wiki page is older and it contained the mistake from its beginnings.

The tower was named "Torre Monumental" and in 1983 or 1984 it was renamed as "Torre Monumental" just to avoid vandalism (a little bit of magical thinking kept in all those web pages). "Known as Torre de los Ingleses" (as people has always call it) doesn't mean it was ever named that way.
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:21 AM   #149
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
Still haven't seen an answer to this, except a joke one, and I'm curious. What's the size of standard wine (or liquor) bottles in Europe/UK/your country.
In most of Europe bottled wine comes in 750 ml. Ditto for liqour. You can get wine and liquor in 1000 ml as well, but 750 ml is by far the most common.
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:29 AM   #150
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Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
One of the few legit issues the Metric system does have is that since the system is exact it's scales and ranges are more universal and therefore don't always line up with real world ranges. A person is going to be more familer on an emotional level with the ranges of most of the Imperial scales than the metric.
Billions of people are perfectly able to gauge the temperatures from around -20C to 40C and tell what clothing is appropriate for the temperature that day. It's a non-argument.
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:33 AM   #151
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Originally Posted by erlando View Post
In most of Europe bottled wine comes in 750 ml. Ditto for liqour. You can get wine and liquor in 1000 ml as well, but 750 ml is by far the most common.
Our (many ) bottles are 750 for wine but 700 for spirits.
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Old 6th January 2018, 06:37 AM   #152
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Originally Posted by GlennB View Post
Our (many ) bottles are 750 for wine but 700 for spirits.
You're right of course. I just went bottle-hunting and confirmed it.
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Old 6th January 2018, 11:08 AM   #153
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Originally Posted by GlennB View Post
Our (many ) bottles are 750 for wine but 700 for spirits.
Yes, that's pretty much what I see; you do get the occasional 70cl bottle of wine, but I don't think I've seen 75cl bottles of spirits.
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Old 6th January 2018, 11:24 AM   #154
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Originally Posted by GlennB
I dunno. It strikes me that 0F (-18C) is more than merely cold, it's savagely cold. Given that Mr Fahrenheit worked in Holland - a temperate country - it doesn't seem likely that he chose that range based on regular personal experience.

"The lower defining point, 0 °F, was established as the temperature of a solution of brine made from equal parts of ice and salt. Further limits were established as the melting point of ice (32 °F) ..."
I remember reading somewhere (though it may well be a myth) that Mr Fahrenheit, living where he did, thought that there would never be anything colder than a mixture of ice and salt - so there would never be a need for negative temperatures on his scale. And he chose one hundred degrees to be human body temperature - but as we now know that standard human body temperature is 98.6 F, his calculations were either a bit out, or he used a subject who had something of a fever when making his calibrations.
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Old 6th January 2018, 11:42 AM   #155
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Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
I'm 99.9% certain it's the other way around. The wiki page is older and it contained the mistake from its beginnings.

The tower was named "Torre Monumental" and in 1983 or 1984 it was renamed as "Torre Monumental" just to avoid vandalism (a little bit of magical thinking kept in all those web pages). "Known as Torre de los Ingleses" (as people has always call it) doesn't mean it was ever named that way.
Well if the city that has a monument is getting it's history from Wikipedia rather than their own historical records and professional historians that's an even bigger problem you should point out to them. FYI - every one of the dozens of site, book, and news references I've looked at from a Google search says that "Torre de los Ingleses" was the original name. A number of them also say the name was changed because of citizen bad feelings towards the British about the Falklands war. I can not find even one single reference that says what you claim.

If you have any references for your claim please provide them and I will gladly fix the Wikipedia article for you.
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Old 6th January 2018, 12:42 PM   #156
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Originally Posted by paulhutch View Post
Well if the city that has a monument is getting it's history from Wikipedia rather than their own historical records
And that's just the beginning of it.

I got the story of the tower in the encyclopaedia Argentina, published in 1971 when I was 8 or 9, and I learnt the real name of the tower from it. So I was draftable when they decided to change the name of the park (not the name of the tower) from "Plaza Britania" (the official name it got in 1914 because of the tower, I've just learnt) to "Plaza Fuerza Aérea Argentina", which became an ordinance one year later or so, by the end of 1983 or beginning of 1984.

And there's no contradiction, but simply mistakes, when the WP article says «Tras la Guerra de las Malvinas en 1982, la Torre de los Ingleses fue rebautizada con su nombre original "Torre Monumental", aunque los ciudadanos siguen refiriéndose a ella con el nombre "Torre de los Ingleses".». "Torre de los Ingleses" never was its official name, but it was and it continues to be its popular name.

Let's not talk of the mistakes in Wikipedia in any language. There's no hope for it. My participation today is reduced to deleting commercial links or gruesome spelling mistakes.
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Old 6th January 2018, 01:51 PM   #157
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Originally Posted by ceptimus View Post
I remember reading somewhere (though it may well be a myth) that Mr Fahrenheit, living where he did, thought that there would never be anything colder than a mixture of ice and salt - so there would never be a need for negative temperatures on his scale. And he chose one hundred degrees to be human body temperature - but as we now know that standard human body temperature is 98.6 F, his calculations were either a bit out, or he used a subject who had something of a fever when making his calibrations.
Pretty much. Having arbitrarly established 0F then 100F was a bit rough-and-ready, given the difficulty of measuring body temperature accurately. It was a good effort
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Old 6th January 2018, 03:14 PM   #158
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Old 6th January 2018, 03:20 PM   #159
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Originally Posted by jonesdave116 View Post
It is currently 294 K in my flat
295 in our living room, rounded up
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Old 6th January 2018, 03:44 PM   #160
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And it's 535 °R here now, that's why I have turned the fan on.

No need for it this morning, when it was 17 °Ré.
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