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Old 4th April 2012, 07:50 PM   #81
gumboot
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Thanks. I didn't know that story. I knew about the labyrinth and the minotaur but not the rest of the story.

Remember Rollerball? Blood sport is an interesting age old human theme. I cannot imagine watching the Gladiators or people vs lions. You have to really dehumanize people to be able to enjoy that. Dehumanizing is visible all around us. It plays a role in my novel. Do we really have any modern day openly enjoyed blood sport anywhere? I'm not talking about sports that have casualties or people who would readily spill someone's blood. But since the Gladiators has humanity been that depraved? I'm trying to think of something similar to cheering fights to the death. I'm wondering if humans have passed this phase? Or could it happen again?


To be fair, modern understanding of Gladiatorial combat is something of a myth. Fights were seldom to the death, and indeed pretty early in the Republic's history, combat "sans missio" (absent mercy, or to the death) were made illegal, except in special circumstances.

Your average gladiator only fought half a dozen times a year, and true champions might only fight once. Gladiators were expensive so you didn't just kill them off for fun.

Where the death and blood occurred was in bouts between Gladiators and animals, and in the executions ad gladium. To the first; is it really that much different to hunting as a sport? Not to mention bull fighting is still going strong in Spain, and most cities in the world have their underground pit-fighting. The second related directly to the Roman concept of justice. Rome was a republic, and all citizens were part of the government, so public execution was an important part of maintaining the transparency and "democracy" of the justice system. And it was also a last opportunity for redemption; a condemned criminal who survived their execution could go on to become a champion gladiator; indeed, in same instances a criminal who fought well would be granted life even if they lost the contest.

Interestingly enough, chariot racing was always vastly more popular than gladiatorial combat, and also far more dangerous; you were more likely to die as a charioteer than a gladiator.

I can't help but see a parallel with motor sports racing. Sure, some people watch the races for the thrill of admiring skilled drivers, but some people watch, if they're honest, in the hope of seeing some spectacular crashes.
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Old 4th April 2012, 08:02 PM   #82
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Gumboot, I read your last reply to me but elected not to reply to it directly so that I can stop derailing the thread. I just wanted to let you know I didn't ignore it, and I'm glad to have a fuller understanding of your take on the matter now.

ETA: Oh, and that I agree about the snail's pace of physical format releases. Submit. Wait. Receive. Correct. Submit. Wait. Receive. Correct. Submit. Can I have an advance please? No! But, but I'm all out of liquor . . . and food . . . and I think the cat's sick.

Last edited by Comrade Raptor; 4th April 2012 at 08:09 PM.
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Old 5th April 2012, 12:44 AM   #83
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Funnily enough I just finished the final spellcheck on my manuscript then popped onto Paltalk to check out the forums and stumbled on this thread
My story involves 3 average people from Brighton who find themselves in a world of high fantasy. They have to survive, learn the rules of the world, defeat the evil sorcerer and avoid Lovecraftian horrors using contemporary skills and mindsets. And management strategy
Current title is 'No More Heroes'.
The tone is played absolutely straight but allows for culture-shock humour and some horror.
I have loved writing it, but now it's time for the literary agents...
All advice appreciated (and yes I know how a lot of them feel about fantasy)
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Old 5th April 2012, 08:25 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by Craig4 View Post
I'm working on a cookbook. The working title is "Outrageously Difficult, Time Consuming Recipes You Can Attempt at Home". I expect this will serve a niche market.
Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
I think that's very clever. Most cookbooks are the 'wonderful dishes you can make in 30 minutes' types.
I would buy that cook book, seriously.

I love cooking and I love to spend a whole day preparing a meal (sometimes).
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Old 5th April 2012, 10:54 AM   #85
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I'm really torn on this self publishing vs. go the traditional route issue with my book. As I mentioned previously, my book is about the worst villains in religious history; ranging form ancient popes to modern televangelists. I think there is an audience for this book, but I also think it's subject matter could upset a lot of people and I think many bookstores would not want it on their shelves even if it were published via the traditional route. There are loads of inspirational books on the shelves, but not so many anti-inspirational ones out there. Those that there are are often of the new atheist movement and my book is unlike those as well, because I make no argument for atheism in it.

I don't know if it's worth it to try try and find an agent and then a publisher and then alter my book in ways I might not want to so that it can come out someday in the distant future or if I should just put it in ebook format and get it out there. Either way, I don't expect to get rich off of it.
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Old 5th April 2012, 02:10 PM   #86
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Originally Posted by Avery Dashwood View Post
I'm really torn on this self publishing vs. go the traditional route issue with my book. As I mentioned previously, my book is about the worst villains in religious history; ranging form ancient popes to modern televangelists. I think there is an audience for this book, but I also think it's subject matter could upset a lot of people and I think many bookstores would not want it on their shelves even if it were published via the traditional route. There are loads of inspirational books on the shelves, but not so many anti-inspirational ones out there. Those that there are are often of the new atheist movement and my book is unlike those as well, because I make no argument for atheism in it.

I don't know if it's worth it to try try and find an agent and then a publisher and then alter my book in ways I might not want to so that it can come out someday in the distant future or if I should just put it in ebook format and get it out there. Either way, I don't expect to get rich off of it.
Just a couple of things. First of all, my novel was barely changed before publication, and the parts that were, were done in agreement between me and the editor. You are most likely not going to have to radically change the story, just clean up the wording and phrasing. It's really not that horrible; everything my editor pointed out, she was right about.

And once it was accepted, it came out in ebook format within three months. No distant future.

I spent about a year hawking it to both agents and publishers and got 16 rejections (a fairly average number) before it got picked up. At some point you quit and take a different route, but I don't think that's too long to work at it.

Also, there's work to be done if you are going to self-publish. You will have to learn the software, whether you're going POD or ebook, create a cover, get an editor, etc. It's not just a matter of putting your Word doc up, although it's fairly easy. You might think about joing LinkedIn if you're not already a member and joing some of the writers' groups, where you can get really good advice about how to do it.

Gumboot - Scrivener - sounds like a good idea. I usually use a seperate file for each chapter, but at some point I have to start compiling stuff, and it's a pain. Sounds like something I should check out - thanks!
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Old 5th April 2012, 02:17 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by Tiktaalik View Post
I spent about a year hawking it to both agents and publishers and got 16 rejections (a fairly average number) before it got picked up. At some point you quit and take a different route, but I don't think that's too long to work at it.
Dr. Seuss was rejected 23 times. After #23, he was on his way home to dump the damn manuscript ("And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street") into the trash burner. He fortuitously ran into an old college chum who happened to be an editor of children's books, and he has never been out of print since and likely never will be.
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Old 5th April 2012, 03:08 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Tiktaalik View Post
...
I spent about a year hawking it to both agents and publishers and got 16 rejections (a fairly average number) before it got picked up. At some point you quit and take a different route, but I don't think that's too long to work at it. ...
Do you have any sense for why they rejected it? It's not like there aren't a jillion bad books that get published so why reject decent ones?

I truly can't imagine why 7 publishers would have turned down Harry Potter.
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Old 5th April 2012, 04:09 PM   #89
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"Gone With the Wind" was turned down by a score of publishers before it was picked up. The Beatles were turned down by numerous record labels.

History is full of fools that didn't recognise a revolutionary talent when it was put in front of them. I wonder how many great works human culture has missed out on, because the artist grew disheartened from all the rejection and just gave up.

And when being rejected over and over, it's hard to decide if you're one of those talents, being overlooked by fools, or if your work really is just crap.
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Old 5th April 2012, 09:05 PM   #90
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
At this point I'm going to shamelessly plug writing software called "Scrivener". I find it great, but I think if you're writing in a non-linear way it would be invaluable. ...
This does look like something I really really need right now. My story is getting unwieldy and the software reviews look great. But my computer illiteracy is already an issue. I have a Mac, I can figure out the appropriate version, but they keep talking about the Windows version differing and I'm using 'Word'. So I'm assuming I need the Mac version, Windows is not my OS, but what if I'm using a Microsoft WP?

I know, I know, my ignorance is showing. Oh well.
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Old 5th April 2012, 09:30 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
This does look like something I really really need right now. My story is getting unwieldy and the software reviews look great. But my computer illiteracy is already an issue. I have a Mac, I can figure out the appropriate version, but they keep talking about the Windows version differing and I'm using 'Word'. So I'm assuming I need the Mac version, Windows is not my OS, but what if I'm using a Microsoft WP?

I know, I know, my ignorance is showing. Oh well.


The Windows/Mac versions are solely related to Operating System. Once you have it, you would import your work into Scrivener and from then on work on it in Scrivener. You can open/import a wide range of text files (including .doc and .rtf) but alternatively you could just use copy and paste if you wanted.

The way I did it (because I had several complete drafts already in word) was I took my latest draft and opened it in scrivener which creates a new project.

Initially your entire document will be a single text file under the project structure tree. I then created folders for the chapters, and then the chopping up begins. Quite simply, I went through the single massive text file. Each place I wanted a new text file (which for me was every new scene) I simply split the file. This creates a second text file under the project structure tree which contains all the rest of the document except the little bit you just split off. Down to the next scene break and split again, and so on.
Once I reached the end of a chapter I simply selected all the text files for that chapter and dragged them into the chapter folder I'd set up (exactly as you would moving files about in Windows Explorer).

The Mac version is much more advanced than the Windows one because it started on Mac, so if you're on Mac you'll get to enjoy a bunch of features I have to sit about waiting impatiently to be added (I'll be waiting some time because it's a single person building the Windows version).
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Old 6th April 2012, 07:52 AM   #92
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But just think how many brillant novels made it to the trash burner, and that was that.
Me I'm going the E-book route
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Old 6th April 2012, 09:51 AM   #93
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Do you have any sense for why they rejected it? It's not like there aren't a jillion bad books that get published so why reject decent ones?

I truly can't imagine why 7 publishers would have turned down Harry Potter.
Every time I got a rejection, before I submitted to another pub/agent, I re-worked my query letter, my single-sentence synopsis, and my paragraph-long synopsis. Each time it got better. Finally I hit a publisher looking for my kind of work at the time I submitted it, with a decent query letter. In many cases I never got a rejection letter, or any reply, at all; I just quit expecting one after a certain period of time, so in those cases I have no idea. The others were all form letters, some more or less polite.

I doubt the pubs who got a query for Harry Potter even read the manuscript at all. They looked at the query, said, "Mmm, yeah, no, doesn't ring my bell," and that was it.

You've got about one sentence to grab an agent or publisher's attention enough to make them read the next paragraph. Then you've got that paragraph to get them to read the excerpt you've sent (or not sent) with it. No wonder so many authors are turning to self-publication. The ebook markets are collaborating with authors and making it easy. Look at Gumboot's experience with submitting hard-copy above. Really? In this day and age? That doesn't give me confidence in the marketing ability of that publisher.
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Old 6th April 2012, 09:58 AM   #94
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Originally Posted by Tiktaalik View Post
Every time I got a rejection, before I submitted to another pub/agent, I re-worked my query letter, my single-sentence synopsis, and my paragraph-long synopsis. Each time it got better. Finally I hit a publisher looking for my kind of work at the time I submitted it, with a decent query letter. In many cases I never got a rejection letter, or any reply, at all; I just quit expecting one after a certain period of time, so in those cases I have no idea. The others were all form letters, some more or less polite.

I doubt the pubs who got a query for Harry Potter even read the manuscript at all. They looked at the query, said, "Mmm, yeah, no, doesn't ring my bell," and that was it.

You've got about one sentence to grab an agent or publisher's attention enough to make them read the next paragraph. Then you've got that paragraph to get them to read the excerpt you've sent (or not sent) with it. No wonder so many authors are turning to self-publication. The ebook markets are collaborating with authors and making it easy. Look at Gumboot's experience with submitting hard-copy above. Really? In this day and age? That doesn't give me confidence in the marketing ability of that publisher.
Thanks. This sounds like very useful advice.

Re Gumboot's submission, If you had to submit your work to dozens of publishers who only wanted submissions not being submitted to more than one publisher at a time, the timeframe of the turnaround would be a killer.
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Old 6th April 2012, 10:33 AM   #95
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And as I recall, the newfangled "printed" books were considered tacky and low-class by the scrivners who produced, and the people who owned, manuscript books. Something to do with books suddenly becoming cheap and affordable to the common masses.

There's an absolutely wonderful engraving by Durer from Guttenberg's time, showing books being printed and then somewhat facetiously being "baked" in an oven, giving the impression that books would be as simple to produce as baking loaves of bread.

Beanbag
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Old 6th April 2012, 01:25 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Thanks. This sounds like very useful advice.

Re Gumboot's submission, If you had to submit your work to dozens of publishers who only wanted submissions not being submitted to more than one publisher at a time, the timeframe of the turnaround would be a killer.
Most of them say that. I just ignored it. How would they know?

Originally Posted by Beanbag View Post
And as I recall, the newfangled "printed" books were considered tacky and low-class by the scrivners who produced, and the people who owned, manuscript books. Something to do with books suddenly becoming cheap and affordable to the common masses.

There's an absolutely wonderful engraving by Durer from Guttenberg's time, showing books being printed and then somewhat facetiously being "baked" in an oven, giving the impression that books would be as simple to produce as baking loaves of bread.

Beanbag
Great analogy. Substitute computer for oven, and we've got it.
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Old 6th April 2012, 01:43 PM   #97
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Originally Posted by Tiktaalik View Post
Most of them say that. I just ignored it. How would they know?
In theory, they talk to each other. Supposedly, it's a close community.

Or so I've been told. The best thing to do is to check their write-up on what the want and see if the allow simultaneous submissions. Some will, if they're told about it.

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Old 6th April 2012, 05:01 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Re Gumboot's submission, If you had to submit your work to dozens of publishers who only wanted submissions not being submitted to more than one publisher at a time, the timeframe of the turnaround would be a killer.

I ignore that. To me it does show, however, how wrong the entire attitude of some publishing places is. Writers are the ones producing the product that makes them lots of money, not the other way around.

Until my work is published, I own all rights to it, and I'll do what I want with it.

If anything, that attitude is a warning bell. I think some publishing places take it for granted that writers should be grateful that they deigned to publish you. If you really think about it, that entire dynamic is seriously messed up. If anything they should be grateful you chose them to publish with. After all, you're selling them a product, and if they want it, that means they think it will make money, which means other publishers would want it too, which means they should be earning the right to be the one that gets it.

Although... to be fair I think writers do themselves no credit here, because so many approach publishers as beggers with their bowls out. As a contractor, I've had to negotiate contracts for myself hundreds of times, and in my experience it's always a mistake to approach with the attitude that you need the work and you're grateful for it. Even if it's true (which it usually is) you have to enter into it with the attitude that you could take it or leave it, and will only sign if the terms are acceptable to you. If you don't do that, they will ride all over you.
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Old 6th April 2012, 06:14 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
...I think writers do themselves no credit here, because so many approach publishers as beggers with their bowls out. As a contractor, I've had to negotiate contracts for myself hundreds of times, and in my experience it's always a mistake to approach with the attitude that you need the work and you're grateful for it. Even if it's true (which it usually is) you have to enter into it with the attitude that you could take it or leave it, and will only sign if the terms are acceptable to you. If you don't do that, they will ride all over you.
Bravo!!!

I'll keep that in mind. I've got a meeting with a producer tomorrow who's interested in one of my screenplays. If nothing else, I should get a decent meal (Cajun food) out of the meeting.

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Old 6th April 2012, 06:19 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by Beanbag View Post
Bravo!!!

I'll keep that in mind. I've got a meeting with a producer tomorrow who's interested in one of my screenplays. If nothing else, I should get a decent meal (Cajun food) out of the meeting.

Beanbag
I'm excited for you. Good luck.
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Old 6th April 2012, 07:32 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by Beanbag View Post
In theory, they talk to each other. Supposedly, it's a close community.

Or so I've been told. The best thing to do is to check their write-up on what the want and see if the allow simultaneous submissions. Some will, if they're told about it.

Beanbag
I'd been told that, too. But the listing services I started using listed thousands of agents and publishers. I was submitting to Chicago, New York, California, etc. Somehow I don't think they're all calling each other and comparing notes on the thousands of submissions they receive each week.

Plus, about half of them never responded at all. How would I know when I've been rejected by them? I'll give 'em a couple weeks, and if I don't hear by then, it's on to someone else.
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Old 6th April 2012, 08:13 PM   #102
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Forgive me, I'm having a bout of delirium. Damn I have a good story. I will have to learn the rest, writing skill, marketing, promoting and publishing skills.

That's all, carry on.
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Old 6th April 2012, 08:51 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by LogicFail View Post
Moby Dick, I never had to read it for school and the last time I tried to read it Katrina happened midway and I never went back to read it. Got it on the Nook for free yesterday so.... I remember it being fairly interesting.
Check the thread title -- this is for books you're currently writing.

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Old 6th April 2012, 08:55 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
I'm excited for you. Good luck.
I know the producer, have worked with them in the recent past, and have had fairly good experiences with them. However, I'm fairly certain this will NOT be the instance where I can quit my day job and write/direct/photograph for a living. Think low-budget. However, it could be a step in that direction. Like I said, I should at least get a decent meal out of the meeting. And this producer is not as flakey as a lot of others I've had to deal with.

Meanwhile, I've still got those novels in the works.

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Old 6th April 2012, 10:07 PM   #105
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Originally Posted by gumboot View Post
At this point I'm going to shamelessly plug writing software called "Scrivener".
I'll second that plug for Scrivener. I'm using it to write my novel and it is tremendously useful. I have played around with a few other nice examples of writing software, such a yWriter, but Scrivener has been a blessing.

You can try it out for thirty days for free. That's thirty days of actual use, so you're not penalized if you skip a few days. Also the trial version is exactly the same as the purchased version. If you decide to purchase, I believe it is still only $45. It's a great deal.

I have no affiliation with Scrivener other than as a satisfied customer.

Last edited by Monza; 6th April 2012 at 10:09 PM. Reason: I should make an attempt to spell properly in a thread about writing.
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Old 6th April 2012, 11:27 PM   #106
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Originally Posted by Beanbag View Post
Check the thread title -- this is for books you're currently writing.

Beanbag
well crap, guess I better go report my own post
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Old 7th April 2012, 05:26 AM   #107
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Originally Posted by LogicFail View Post
well crap, guess I better go report my own post
I'm sure somebody will be considerate enough to do that for you.



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Old 7th April 2012, 06:25 AM   #108
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Originally Posted by kedo1981 View Post
But just think how many brillant novels made it to the trash burner, and that was that.
Me I'm going the E-book route
Not so many now, with the rise of e-publishing, but you do have to wonder how many great stories never saw the light of day back when.
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Old 7th April 2012, 07:29 AM   #109
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Originally Posted by Beanbag View Post
Check the thread title -- this is for books you're currently writing.

Beanbag
LogicFail has obviously traveled back in time and is currently re-writing Moby Dick. I'm not sure why, but hey, to each time-traveler his own...
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Old 7th April 2012, 09:42 AM   #110
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I've been writing a science fiction novel for several years. It will be part of a series if/when I finish the first volume.

Plot and characters come easily to me. I've had several years to complexify then simplify the plot, and only recently did I come to understand the motivation for the characters who form the axis of the series. I really like where the plot is at.

As someone likely to have Asperger's, I thought that I'd have the most difficulty with dialog. When I wrote part of the first draft during a NaNoWriMo a few years ago, I found that focusing on dialog and writing quickly to get the novel out of my head was both effective and liberating. The dialog came easily to me, the plot went in directions I hadn't planned (but liked), characters grew and behaved differently than I expected, and some new characters popped in that I hadn't expected, more fully formed than they should have been.

I do have problems with description, something that I'm working on. It is challenging for me and I need to do several drafts before I am even barely satisfied.

I am focusing on writing for now. If it never gets beyond me, that would be ok, but I'd really enjoy sharing it. I really enjoy what I'm writing.

I may explore the conventional publishing path, but am fully prepared to deal with self-publishing as well, either as an alternative or as a fallback. I really don't enjoy interacting with most people.

I do not plan to publish fiction under my own name. While I'd enjoy sharing my work, I do not want any attention.
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Old 7th April 2012, 10:49 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by Complexity View Post
I've been writing a science fiction novel for several years. It will be part of a series if/when I finish the first volume.

Plot and characters come easily to me. I've had several years to complexify then simplify the plot, and only recently did I come to understand the motivation for the characters who form the axis of the series. I really like where the plot is at.

As someone likely to have Asperger's, I thought that I'd have the most difficulty with dialog. When I wrote part of the first draft during a NaNoWriMo a few years ago, I found that focusing on dialog and writing quickly to get the novel out of my head was both effective and liberating. The dialog came easily to me, the plot went in directions I hadn't planned (but liked), characters grew and behaved differently than I expected, and some new characters popped in that I hadn't expected, more fully formed than they should have been.

I do have problems with description, something that I'm working on. It is challenging for me and I need to do several drafts before I am even barely satisfied.....
This is amazingly similar to my experience. There are some differences. I'm not having trouble with dialog. Though when I'm revising scenes sometimes I can't believe how dorky something I wrote sounds now. But not all of it, only some. And the re-writes seem to be taking care of the really horrible stuff. My characters are growing. Their moral dilemmas are reaching more clarity and their characters less one sided.

I've been reading other peoples descriptions and all the fun suggestions you can find in short format online. One link leads to another and another. Not everything is instantly useful but the ideas are helpful for a novice writer like myself.

Cliffhangers
25 things you should know about word choice

The first link is a fun blog with more stuff and there's a 20% discount on Scrivener if you didn't turn in your 50K words for the NaNoWriMo to qualify for the 50% discount. $45 is nothing though, I spent $60 for a voice recorder to record my thoughts when I was walking and at least that much on 3 extra flash drives to keep multiple copies of the book on.

And a book of ancient inventions gave me a great idea for a whole new scene. Of course describing it is another story. But every time I have a new revelation my confidence in the book grows.


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Old 7th April 2012, 12:21 PM   #112
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Curious about people's opinions:

Should I call my 17-19 yr olds boys/girls or men/women? Or should I make an effort to let the reader put their own image to the characters and use more neutral words like guys?
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Old 7th April 2012, 12:54 PM   #113
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Curious about people's opinions:

Should I call my 17-19 yr olds boys/girls or men/women? Or should I make an effort to let the reader put their own image to the characters and use more neutral words like guys?

I wouldn't attempt the "neutral" route, personally, because the narrative voice will have its influence one way or another; no matter how neutral, the reader will still take that very neutrality as a cue. (Which is to say, the neutral route may be effectively impossible unless your goal is to have the readers view their status neutrally as well.)

Obviously not much can be said to be appropriate without knowing specifics, but my "gut" here tells me that the most natural approach would be to have the narrative voice pronounce its judgement on the matter depending on how you see their development as they transition from child to adult. For instance, referring to a character in that age consistently as "boy" so long as he acts more-so like a child or is seen more as one by others or even sees himself more as one and then switching to "man" after some timely event could have a much more powerful effect than being consistent the entire time. The decision to call a man doing a man's work "boy" can be as damning as calling a boy doing a man's work "man" can be affirming. Use that.

This could lead to interesting problems if you're dealing with multiple people of the same age. If you have two kids from the same high school graduating class and you're referring to one as man and the other as boy but they both appear in the same scenes, that could be a lot more pointed than might be desired. "Young man" (and its ilk) might be a good solution, though that exact wording often feels more appropriate (by tradition) for a patronizing way to refer to a 12 year old.

Still, consistency robs you of nice options. One solution is to use a general description, set against whatever context they're in, and also according to the context in which the narrative voice is bringing them up in the first place. If among their peers, they can all be boys or young men or men, depending on how that group might be seen by society at large. If in the company of significantly older men, they're all boys. If in the company of significantly younger kids, they're all men. If dealing with a character singly, use whatever feels appropriate as mentioned in my second paragraph.

Finally, don't forget character perspective. To a 17-year-old kid, these kinds of distinctions matter. Outside of that, not so much. Also, please excuse that I've focused on the masculine -- obviously this applies to both genders and I merely sought to avoid unnecessary verbal clutter. Although now that I mention it, the decision to treat those unequally can help inform the reader about how society in your setting regards these issues, either by enforcing that viewpoint or by clashing with it as it has been portrayed.

Anyway, that's my cents. Thanks, btw, for the link to the "25 things" posts. Those are gold and I'm enjoying them.
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Old 7th April 2012, 01:07 PM   #114
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Originally Posted by Cynic View Post
...
Anyway, that's my cents. Thanks, btw, for the link to the "25 things" posts. Those are gold and I'm enjoying them.
Thanks, that's actually very helpful.

The 25 things is indeed a hoot.
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Old 7th April 2012, 01:26 PM   #115
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Curious about people's opinions:

Should I call my 17-19 yr olds boys/girls or men/women? Or should I make an effort to let the reader put their own image to the characters and use more neutral words like guys?

If being referred to by a character, use the character's voice - how he or she would refer to them. If being referred to by a narrator, use the narrator's voice. Your characters and narrator will become real enough so that the language that they would use in each situation will become apparent.
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Old 7th April 2012, 07:47 PM   #116
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Not to derail my own thread, but I've just made it back from my meeting with a producer. I've received a --tentative-- offer for one of my screenplays (NOT a book), plus a request that I direct it as well if/when it goes into production. It seems all the arguments I gave them for why it's not a good idea for the director and screenwriter to be the same person only convinced them even more that I should direct it. Sigh. They've seen my previous shorts and have worked with me on other projects in the past, and apparently they think I know what I'm doing and they like the results.

No money has changed hands yet, and nothing's been signed; only a handshake understanding at this point that the property is available so they can start pulling together the financing and budget.

It's a heady experience, but at this point the whole deal's about as substantial as a puff of smoke, and can dissipate just as easily.

I ain't quitting my day job just yet.

We now return you to our regularly scheduled thread topic.

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Old 7th April 2012, 10:20 PM   #117
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So is this for a stage play or a film?
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Old 8th April 2012, 05:59 AM   #118
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Congratulations, Beanbag! That's great! Keep us informed...
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Old 8th April 2012, 06:24 AM   #119
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currently editing & rewriting a book called War Poets, a first world war superhero adventure.
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Old 8th April 2012, 07:20 AM   #120
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post


So is this for a stage play or a film?
Feature-length adventure film.

Logline (one-line summary of the story): Life becomes interesting (and complicated) in a quiet neighborhood when an occult group moves in next door and attempts to summon a demon in their back yard.

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