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Old 21st November 2019, 07:56 AM   #81
Giordano
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The perception of color is heavily processed by the brain. One of the best examples is if one is in a room lit by typical incandescent bulbs the lighting may seem “warm” to you but not otherwise very odd. Take a picture there with a camera that doesn’t automatically adjust color balance and the picture will look incredibly yellow or even orange when you view it later. Most fluorescent bulbs output light in narrow wavelengths; we don’t usually notice when in a room lit by them but again an uncompensated photo will usually reveal odd color tints, such as greens.
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Old 21st November 2019, 08:03 AM   #82
JeanTate
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Originally Posted by smartcooky View Post
I use the word "cyan" a lot but that is just because in my trade, cyan, magenta and yellow are key parts of everyday subject material

"this photo needs more/less cyan"
"the photo-cyan cartridge is low on dye"
"the cyan filter is stuck/broken"



etc

In this country the "amber" light is more often referred to as the "orange" light.

Also, I think our lights work a little differently from some other countries... the orange light comes on for about 6 seconds after the green light goes out and before the red light comes on. At no time is more than one light on..... green > orange > red > green
How about green -> yellow/orange/amber -> red -> red AND amber together -> green?
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Old 21st November 2019, 08:22 AM   #83
William Parcher
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Originally Posted by HansMustermann View Post
I learned about colours like teal, alpaca and whatnot only when I started to do graphics modding for games.
That was the color I chose for my bedroom.
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Old 21st November 2019, 08:42 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
That was the color I chose for my bedroom.
Now I'm fascinated by what that color would look like.

Maybe it's actually a pattern or texture, not just a color.
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Old 21st November 2019, 08:56 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by Ziggurat View Post
Now I'm fascinated by what that color would look like.

Maybe it's actually a pattern or texture, not just a color.
It is everything at once. The color has color, pattern, texture, flavor and attitude (or mood if you prefer). Maybe that is why the color is called whatnot but I'm not sure.

This morning the attitude was good. On some days it can be slow and mostly worthless. But I have found that throwing a cup of strong coffee upon it will kick it into a higher gear.
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Old 21st November 2019, 11:48 AM   #86
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Originally Posted by Apathia View Post
"Geoluread" (yellow-red)

Which, in a way, nicely circles us right back to the start.

"Blue-green" was a common use word for "cyan", and in fact, is still in common English use.
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Old 21st November 2019, 02:45 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by kellyb View Post
Back in the old acid days of the wild 90's, an artist friend of mine and I freaked out thinking about color blindness and how, in theory, what I call green, he could see as red, and we'd never notice we were actually seeing different colors. We'd just have a different word we were taught for all the colors.
Except, of course, that you have to be careful about your environment.

Here's an experiment: You are locked in a room, and presented with two buttons, one red (a white ground-glass illuminated by a 633 nm laser) and one green (using a 532 nm laser). In 60 seconds the room will turn into an incinerator. You can push one and only one button (the act will lock out the other). If you push the red button the door will open and you can go free. If you push the green button, nothing will happen.

50% of the time a truly colorblind person will die, as well as those who for whatever reason, have no words to distinguish red from green, vs 0% for a non-neurodiverse person. This is not what most people consider a negligable consideration.

As you say, wavelength is the best reference point.
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Old 21st November 2019, 02:58 PM   #88
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Be that as it may, as someone who lived in the USA (FL) and Germany, I can state with confidence that German green traffic lights are most positively green. US 'green' traffic lights frequently ... aren't. (Maybe they are now more, since they shifted to LEDs.) Very very often I have seen traffic lights where the 'green' element was almost white, with a strong blue component. I cannot recall to have ever seen such a color on a traffic light here in Germany.
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Old 21st November 2019, 05:21 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by kellyb View Post
Wavelength is definitely the best objective measure and "point" to focus on for creating a consensus around and deciding on a name of a color.
As RecoveringYuppy noted, wavelength alone is far from sufficient. Individual variations aside, we sense light with three types of color sensors with overlapping sensitivity curves and a fourth that is sensitive to a much broader range than any of them and becomes dominant at low light levels. Even wavelength distributions don't have a unique mapping to colors, the same color can be produced by very different spectra.

Just think about the range of color impressions produced by computer monitors/TVs...all from various combinations of three component colors. And since those components don't exactly match your eyes, there are colors that can't be represented on such displays. (Flower colors in particular seem to frequently be off in photographs, maybe due to spectra extending further into the violet range than sensors and displays can handle.)
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Old 21st November 2019, 05:43 PM   #90
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I'm just going to note that here a "green" light does not mean "go" and I suspect the same is true elsewhere in the world.

What a "Green" light actually means is that "you may proceed, if it is safe to do so, and you do not have to give way to other traffic."

It's like a lot of people think that a Yellow/Amber/Orange light means "get ready to stop", when is fact it means "Stop! If it is safe for you to do so."
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Old 21st November 2019, 05:57 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
My understanding of the claim is that before Old English they simply had no name for the color we call orange. To me that means that they didn't call it "amber", or "like amber", or "Fred", or anything. They simply said nothing at all.

I find that to be an extraordinary claim and I am skeptical. Maybe I don't understand the claim.
Ach! They simply didn't have a specific name for that color, calling it, instead, yellow-red which is a little like saying yellow-blue for the color green.*



*Depending on the color mixing involved, of course. https://isle.hanover.edu/Ch06Color/Ch06ColorMixer.html

Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
Excellent. Claims that they didn't have a word for orange are false.

Again! They didn't have a word for orange and instead combined two words used for two different colors but when these two colors are mixed together result in what we modernists call orange.

As a side note, in almost all the western European languages the color orange is also the name of the fruit orange. Jean Tate's post explains why.
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Old 21st November 2019, 06:10 PM   #92
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They did have a name for the color that we now call orange. That name was geoluhread.

I was skeptical of the claim that they had no name.
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Old 21st November 2019, 06:15 PM   #93
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Who cares what the color is called? All I want to know is what color it really is.
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Old 21st November 2019, 06:26 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Who cares what the color is called? All I want to know is what color it really is.
The only objective way to convey that information is by stating its wavelength, which has already been done. Different people will have different words for the same wavelength of light.
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Old 21st November 2019, 08:53 PM   #95
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I had a friend in high school who had a class ring. Some days I'd see the stone as red, and sometimes as green. He gave it to me to hold once (while bowling or something) and I held it up very close to my eye and immediately say "Oh! It's red!" (or green, whichever). I realized that as it covered much more of my field of vision I was incorporating many more of my poor color sensors, and it kicked into the right hue.

It still works for me with little power indicator LED lights. Back when I had a PC and had to call for support, they'd often ask me what color the lights were in the back. I'd then have to get on my knees and put my eye right up to it.

Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
That was the color I chose for my bedroom.
One of the few things my sister did when staying with me (in lieu of paying rent) was to paint the bathroom. I'd asked for a nice neutral light gray. Turned out she did it while I was on vacation without telling me. What I got was a cold steely white-blue which I instantly detested.
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Old 21st November 2019, 09:13 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
I had a friend in high school who had a class ring. Some days I'd see the stone as red, and sometimes as green. He gave it to me to hold once (while bowling or something) and I held it up very close to my eye and immediately say "Oh! It's red!" (or green, whichever). I realized that as it covered much more of my field of vision I was incorporating many more of my poor color sensors, and it kicked into the right hue.
Might it have been one of these?

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Old 21st November 2019, 09:26 PM   #97
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
Might it have been one of these?
No, it wasn't iridescent or anything like that. Not even a Mood Ring (and that was the time period for them, so I know.) Just a mostly transparent, colored, reflective stone.
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Old 21st November 2019, 10:12 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
When I hear "Midori" I can only think of a musician or a drink.
I can only think of My Hero Academia.

And thanks to this thread, I understand his costume better.
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Old 21st November 2019, 10:55 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by Puppycow View Post
Oh, and I just came across an explanation:

The Japanese traffic light blues: Stop on red, go on what?
It's very interesting that the Chinese word qing, which has the same character representation (青), as the Japanese word that is transated as blue, means "green".

Or at least, I've always understood the Chinese word 青 to mean green. Google translate agrees. We also have the word "lv“ 绿,which means green, and is generally used when referring to the color green. I only encounter 青 in other words like 青菜.
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Old 21st November 2019, 11:06 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
They did have a name for the color that we now call orange. That name was geoluhread.

I was skeptical of the claim that they had no name.
Why are you skeptical of that? How many names for colors do you have? How many names for colors does your wife have? Do we really need to go down this road, Parcher?!
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Old 22nd November 2019, 05:23 AM   #101
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
It's another tiny piece of evidence for the gradual shift of Australian popular culture from British influence to American influence that I grew up calling the middle light amber, and I was taught that in school, but today I hear it more often referred to as yellow.
What colour is the light though? Here in the UK we call them "amber" and they're a shade I'd pretty squarely categorise as orange, not yellow.

I recently ran into the opposite version of what the relationship is between "orange" and "amber" on the red-to-yellow scale. I had to replace tiny display backlight LEDs in some equipment and, as working ones looked red to me, I ordered red LEDs (from a choice of yellow, orange, amber or red) but they were clearly not a good match when fitted. In the end the right choice was called "amber" but to me the colour was a very slightly orangey red.

So is amber a reddish orange or a yellowish orange?

And don't get me started on car indicators/turn signals. Here they must be amber all round and it really bugs me when I occasionally see a car (mostly French I think) using a very pale yellow. Makes me wonder if they were meant to use an amber tinted bulb inside a yellowish lens but fitted a plain one by mistake.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 05:56 AM   #102
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Originally Posted by Jack by the hedge View Post
What colour is the light though? Here in the UK we call them "amber" and they're a shade I'd pretty squarely categorise as orange, not yellow.

I recently ran into the opposite version of what the relationship is between "orange" and "amber" on the red-to-yellow scale. I had to replace tiny display backlight LEDs in some equipment and, as working ones looked red to me, I ordered red LEDs (from a choice of yellow, orange, amber or red) but they were clearly not a good match when fitted. In the end the right choice was called "amber" but to me the colour was a very slightly orangey red.

So is amber a reddish orange or a yellowish orange?

And don't get me started on car indicators/turn signals. Here they must be amber all round and it really bugs me when I occasionally see a car (mostly French I think) using a very pale yellow. Makes me wonder if they were meant to use an amber tinted bulb inside a yellowish lens but fitted a plain one by mistake.
Obviously, amber's brown. Brown's a totally different color from orange, right? You wouldn't mix up the color of a fresh juicy orange and a dry old acorn, would you?

And then you try to represent them on an RGB monitor...they differ only in intensity and in context within the image.
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Old 22nd November 2019, 02:29 PM   #103
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Looking at the spectrum of the green traffic light the color would appear be a slightly bluish green or a mix of some cyan and green. The perceptual change between cyan and green is very rapid over a small wavelength change from 490nm to 510nm.

To determine the actual color that most people name you have to integrate the spectra over three color matching functions which gives you X, Y, and Z. From these you determine x and y by dividing X and Y by the sum X,Y, and Z. This is a 2D coordinate that indicates saturation and color.

There are studies on how the naming of color for various xy pairs varies culturally.

https://clarkvision.com/articles/col...nd-perception/
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Old 26th November 2019, 06:31 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by ahhell View Post
This is discussed in the context of the claim that agent people didn't see blue because if you read things like Homer, he never called anything blue. The sea and sky were described in all sorts ways that seem almost to deliberately avoid, "blue", the most commonly sited, "wine dark see". Apparently this is true of a lot of ancient prose and poetry.
https://www.businessinsider.com.au/w...e-color-2015-2 This was a relatively widespread news story, about 2 years ago ish.
It was pure crap. The Greeks simply were more likely to prioritize some other aspect of color like brightness/darkness rather than hue. In fact, ancient Greek and Hittite cognates of "cyan" meaning "blue" (kuanos/kuwanna) are among the color words that can be traced back the farthest and have held their meaning the most consistently over the years compared to how fickle most others are. And the same article also ignored dyes & pigments & paints, along with the fact that no biological change in the species could possibly have spread to us all since such a recent date. It even ended with the author telling the story of how (s)he experimented on his/her daughter by not telling her the sky was blue until she could speak well enough to be asked, and she answered "blue", and the author tried to use this as evidence that people can't see blue until they're told there's something blue to see, because the daughter supposedly hesitated a couple of seconds before independently producing that answer.

Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
Did they just use a different word? What was their word for the color of orange flowers and orange leaves, etc?
Yellow, or sometimes red, or sometimes yellowish-red. Just like what our current language would seem like to future people if, by their time, another word has sprouted up between orange and yellow. Before a new color word appears, there's no hole in the vocabulary where they just can't describe something; the boundaries between other adjacent categories just close in. (Also, keep in mind that orange was a pretty rare color in the Medieval English world, so the need to describe it didn't come up much, so there wasn't much incentive to give it its own word instead of using words they already had.)

Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
They did have a name for the color that we now call orange. That name was geoluhread.
That's literally just "yellow-red", in Old/Middle English. (There's a tendency for "g" to become "y" later on.)
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Old 26th November 2019, 06:39 AM   #105
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I wouldn't be surprised if there's a British Standard for the colour of traffic signals, but I'm struggling to find an online reference.

Seems to be BS EN 12368:2015, but can only find paid sources.
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Old 26th November 2019, 07:27 PM   #106
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For an emission source (such as a traffic light), objectively there is a unique specification, the SED (Spectral Energy Density, or Distribution): the intensity (or energy) vs wavelength (or frequency).

How this SED is perceived, by human eyes, depends on many factors, as noted in posts upthread.
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Old 26th November 2019, 08:06 PM   #107
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
The only objective way to convey that information is by stating its wavelength, which has already been done. Different people will have different words for the same wavelength of light.
Thank you. This is what I was going to say. It comes up in my household when people argue whether tennis balls are green or yellow. “Look up the wavelength” was my regular and ignored advice.
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Old 26th November 2019, 09:09 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
She is saying that those people would have never given a name for the color in nature until they themselves created a dye or paint with that color. I would call that an extraordinary claim. Can you explain more about it?
Well, we know that languages sometimes add or lose color words, thus increasing or decreasing their number of them, just from the fact that they don't all have the same number of them (and even when the numbers are the same they might be unrelated where cognates would be expected, indicating substitution). There's nothing controversial or unexpected about that part.

So the theory is just a matter of when & why it happens. And there are certainly plenty of other examples of the more generalized rule that languages acquire more words for something when the thing itself begins to play more of a role in their speakers' lives. For example, any group of people can be expected to have a word for a wild animal that lives in their area, but if they domesticate that animal, then more words related to it start to appear: separate words for adults of the two genders, a third one for castrated individuals, separate words for them at different ages, words identifying which of several functions an individual might be used to serve, words for what to feed them or how to give it to them, a word for their meat or multiple words for meat cut from different parts, words for the colors or color patterns they come in, words for equipment used in association with them, and words for stages of training or practices & methods involved in training. So there's certainly nothing wrong with expecting the creation of a new dye or such to mark the beginning of the use of a new word for its color, because people would begin having more experience with that color in their lives, or at least could easily begin using the name of the dye as the name of the color, just as Englishers used the name of a fruit as the name of the fruit's color. And there are certainly quite well established examples of that, like "purple" coming from an ancient Semitic name for a type of sea snail from which purple dye was made.

The only problem is with saying that this would be the only way it ever happens. I can see some more examples where it could be argued either way, such as getting "black" from an ancient word for something that had been "burned"; it could happen by observation of the color of charred things but maybe it didn't happen until people started using ashes & soot to make black face-paint & such... but there are others where it seems to just not fit at all. "Green" is related to "grow", "grew", and "growth" because it's the color of growing things (and you see a lot more of it in spring when things are starting to grow again or in places where plants grow well compared to more barren places). Are we to think that, as recently as that, in the development of the Germanic languages, people just then finally started using plants for green paint/dye?

Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
Ok, let's pretend that way back then they did use the terms "carrot colored" or "the color of a carrot" when speaking about the color we call orange...

A person picks an orange flower and asks "what color is this?" The other person correctly answers "carrot colored"...

But then within a minute the same person picks a carrot and asks "what color is this?"...

What would the answer have been?
In a world where that color was called "carrot", the answer would be "carrot"... just like the fact that, in a world where it's called "orange", the answer is "orange", which is also the color you'd say an orange is... because "orange" itself is, just like "carrot", just a comparison with a familiar object, not a just-color-nothing-else word.

Originally Posted by JeanTate View Post
In languages still spoken, in which there are only black/white words, how is the sky described? Blood? Tree leaves, especially deciduous ones? A sunset or sunrise? Where fruits are abundant and eaten, one kind from another? Ripe from not?
There are rather few of those languages, but those that I've heard of do have a general word for "color", so comparisons can be made, but also tend to be mutually comparative; you'd end up saying a poison frog's head is the color of a ripe zuzo berry (I just made that up), but also that zuzo berries are ripe when they're poison-frog-head-colored. Or you might say one or both of them was fire-colored, or blood-colored, but also that blood was ripe-zuzo-colored or poison-frog-head-colored or fire-colored, and so on. There's no limit to the comparisons you could make in such a system, but also no abstract general concept of a thing that manifests in zuzo berries and poison frogs' heads, and thus no name for such a concept.

(It's sort of like languages in which numbers exist only as adjectives, not nouns; you can say there are four boats as part of your description of those boats, but there's no concept of "four" {fourness? fouritude? fourhood?} as a distinct thing to mentally work with separate from a case where that's how many things there are.)

A far more common nearly-minimalist situation with colors in languages is the set of three: white/bright, black/dark, and red/reddish. You can think of the "red" there as anything that relatively strongly stimulates people's red-sensing cone cells, so it would also include yellows, oranges, and maybe bright purples. Notice also that we still load up more on color-words at the red-orange-yellow end of the spectrum even in modern English: not only do we have "orange" for a relatively narrow sliver of the spectrum that really could be looked at as the red-yellow border just like the green-blue border is just the green-blue border, but also, both orange and yellow also include brightness as part of their definitions, with colors of the same hue range going to "brown" when they get too dark, and red is the only hue that also separates from an alternative based on saturation, with low-saturation reds being called "pink".

And all of that is based on the stimulation of the one type of cone cell that evolved the most recently, and these are the colors that seem to stand out from their environment the most to us and grab our attention the most and are used for warning/danger signs, warning/danger lights, and places on a map that vote Republican. None of this is coincidental (well, maybe that last one... maybe). It's evolutionarily useful to get that kind of perceptive impact from those colors and pay that much extra attention to those colors, because those colors are uncommon in natural environments and tend to be found in things that are worth paying attention to: ripe fruits & veggies, poisonous animals, blood, fire, and the transitions between day and night.

So, in languages that have only one word for them all, when you say something is that color, you're saying that there is probably something important about it... which means that the question "what color is that" would be answered essentially "the color of something that stands out for us to pay attention to it", just in one word instead of a bunch. So again, like in the comparison-based system, colors are treated as something about how you relate to the physical world, deciding what to avoid and what to use and how to use it, not abstractions. Abstractification of the concept of colors, such as that demonstrated by the idea that all colors must have names to enable narrow descriptions of them like we're comparing them on a palette, and the idea of asking questions like "what do you call this color", develops somewhere farther down the line, when a language adds more color words.

Originally Posted by JeanTate View Post
I'm curious to learn what the limits of historical linguistics are, given that the vast majority of languages had no written form until quite recently (all those Aboriginal Australian ones, Papuan ones, Amazonian forest ones, ... Yes, bouquets for the extraordinary work in reconstructing PIE, but what chance is there that some 5,000 year old ancestor of Pitjantjatjara, say, can be reconstructed?
In general, past languages don't really get reconstructed, at least not completely. The inability to recover certain sounds or words or grammatical principles begins even over short time spans, essentially immediately; if the available early writings in one Germanic language, for example, don't contain a word that still has known cognates in the other Germanic languages, then even an expert in early Germanic languages won't know whether that language had already lost that word, or still had it but just didn't write it in the writings that we have available now. Then it just gets worse gradually with more time.

PIE is close to the edge of where we can even be sure that a language existed at all. We know of a few hundred undoubted root words and how to inflect/conjugate them, but there must have been a lot more words that are lost, there are a bunch of possible words that we can't tell really were or weren't real words, there are some phonemes that we know were there but not exactly what they sounded like or how certain sequences would even be possible to pronounce at all, and we don't know what order people would naturally have put the words in for most sentences or under what circumstances they might change the order. There have been attempts to find signs of PIE's membership in an even older family together with one or more other major language families we know of like Uralic, but then the number of alleged common root words drops into the dozens and they're suspiciously short & simple with almost no hint of how to inflect or conjugate them to put them in real sentences, so most linguists find them unconvincing.

The name "Pitjantjatjara" is relatively widespread & well known for an Australian language, so it tends to get treated as a language, but it is mutually intelligible with others around it, so standard linguistic convention is to call them dialects of the "Western Desert" language. Some linguists have assembled a language family called Pama-Nyungan which would include Western Desert, but others have said the case that that's a real thing is just too weak, and I'm on their side. The reason I don't buy it is the nature of the case for it, as you can see described at its Wikipedia page: "Hale provides... more than fifty basic-vocabulary cognates (showing regular sound correspondences)... to support the Pama–Nyungan grouping". Fifty? In linguistics as applied to Eurasian families, that's known as... approximately nothing. It's having so little to show for the effort, and having about the same amount of support for multiple contradictory language-family arrangements, that convinced most Eurasian linguists to abandon ideas like Nostratic which would have included a list of known major Eurasian families such as PIE as its branches. And this was Hale's idea of a "decisive riposte" to those who found Pama-Nyungan unconvincing. I guess linguists' standards for accepting as "decisive" such deep-past grouping are just lower in Australia; maybe it's because they have so much less to work with than their counterparts in Eurasia.

An interesting point of comparison between the hypothetical Pama-Nyungan, Eurasian hypotheticals like Nostratic, and the definitely real IE, is the issue of timing. PIE can be dated pretty reliably to about 5-6 millennia ago based on what technology and domesticated animals & plants its speakers apparently did and didn't have. Advocates of Pama-Nyungan put its proto-language at about 5 millennia ago, which sounds about the same (although I don't know with what basis and I can only hope that it's something solid, not just because that's how long it feels like the given amount of diversification should take). But, since the available information to base PIE's reconstruction on includes a written history over the last 2½-3 millennia, there's only a span of about 2½-3 millennia to try to penetrate without writing. And that makes Pama-Nyungan effectively about that much older than PIE for reconstruction purposes because its 5000-year age is essentially entirely without writing. That's the equivalent of trying to find an ancestor of PIE from 8-8½ millennia ago. And that time frame happens to be about when it would have hypothetically been united with one or more other neighboring families like Afro-Asiatic or Turkic or Uralic. So the Pama-Nyunganists are doing about the same thing as the Nostraticists, not only in the amount of evidence they're being swayed by but also in the pre-literacy time frame they ended up at.

Originally Posted by JeanTate View Post
And even for languages for which there is a (long) historical record, how can we say for certain how color words were used colloquially (there are surely a few for which we can have considerable confidence)?
Color words seem to shift around and get replaced somewhat faster on average than most other kinds of words, because of their tendency to either come from metaphors or become metaphors.

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Old 27th November 2019, 08:14 AM   #109
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The last post reminds of some color related trivia. The English words "Black" "Blank" and Spanish "Blanco" are probably cognates from the same proto indo european root which probably meant to burn, gleam brightly. So in German languages is becomes black, whats left after burning, or blank(empty) and in spanish Blanco, white.
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Old 27th November 2019, 10:38 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
Ok, let's pretend that way back then they did use the terms "carrot colored" or "the color of a carrot" when speaking about the color we call orange...
Something in the back of my mind is telling me that orange carrots are a relatively recent thing, and they may well not have been modern carrot coloured "way back when".
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Old 27th November 2019, 11:58 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by Jack by the hedge View Post
Something in the back of my mind is telling me that orange carrots are a relatively recent thing, and they may well not have been modern carrot coloured "way back when".
Indeed, carrots did come in a small variety of colours - white, yellow, purple. You can still get them too - they sell purple carrots at the local farmer's market. You can even buy purple carrot seeds at the local hardware/garden shop to grow your own.

https://www.mitre10.co.nz/shop/mcgre...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

Now they are orange, and William of Orange is to blame...

https://www.tested.com/science/43812...orange-carrot/
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Old 27th November 2019, 12:06 PM   #112
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If anyone wants to substitute this for the carrot question, they may.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg dd.jpg (8.0 KB, 134 views)
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Old 27th November 2019, 12:42 PM   #113
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I was diagnosed with some form of red-green color blindness when I was a kid. I never really noticed it. Red apples look red to me and green grass looks green. I would sometimes have trouble telling some colors apart or seeing details others could spot, but it was never anything too dramatic. Traffic lights appear to be green, yellow, and red.

Then, not too long ago we started using some software at work that listed file names in red if the file was deleted, green if it was new, and grey if it had been changed. I noticed that sometimes when I looked at the list, all of the filenames were shades of grey until I recognized one as deleted or added. Then they suddenly became the correct colors of red, green, or grey.

(The ring story earlier reminded me of the above. I do occasionally get corrected, mostly by my wife, when I get a color wrong or at least what she says is wrong.)

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Old 27th November 2019, 09:28 PM   #114
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Colorblind in the US.

I see white lights with a hint of green from certain angles if I look very carefully. I thought they were white for a very long time. I kinda still do
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Old 28th November 2019, 12:15 AM   #115
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Not sure about green and blue, but my complete lack of telling dark blue and black apart is atrocious.
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Old 28th November 2019, 05:14 PM   #116
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Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Not sure about green and blue, but my complete lack of telling dark blue and black apart is atrocious.

I like your white and dark purple avatar by the way.
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Old 30th November 2019, 03:13 PM   #117
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Men and women see the blue/green crossover differently. Men tend to see blue where women see green.
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Old 30th November 2019, 05:04 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Not sure about green and blue, but my complete lack of telling dark blue and black apart is atrocious.
You should talk to Father Ted about buying priest socks.
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Old 2nd December 2019, 03:47 PM   #119
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Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Not sure about green and blue, but my complete lack of telling dark blue and black apart is atrocious.
Yeah, me too. If you look up images for "dress blue uniform" (US military uniforms), they mostly all appear to be black to me. They are actually "navy blue" but it's such a dark shade of blue that it appears black to my eyes. (Like this, for example)
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Old 2nd December 2019, 06:40 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
Not sure about green and blue, but my complete lack of telling dark blue and black apart is atrocious.
You're in for a terrible problem with your mates if they find out that all this time you've been rooting for the Blues!
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