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Old 5th May 2020, 09:54 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
They are not pseudo-patriotic rednecks. Just poor immigrants people scratching to get by.
I don't care who they are or what color they are - anyone who intentionally goes without a mask and proper behavior when they ought to be doing otherwise (possibly even by law) is a "muh rights" person.

It's senseless to limit the use of the phrase "muh rights" to a very specific demographic or subculture.
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Old 5th May 2020, 10:20 AM   #82
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Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
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Old 5th May 2020, 10:22 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
Capitalism.
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Old 5th May 2020, 11:04 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
Where would they be released? I mean, modern meat and dairy production is based on feeding grain to the animals, not grazing them in pastures. Most of these animals are far away from any forage sufficient to maintain them.

If you did release them into pastures, there would be severe over-grazing with attendant erosion and water quality issues, invasive plant issues, all that.
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Old 5th May 2020, 11:08 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
I don't care who they are or what color they are - anyone who intentionally goes without a mask and proper behavior when they ought to be doing otherwise (possibly even by law) is a "muh rights" person.

It's senseless to limit the use of the phrase "muh rights" to a very specific demographic or subculture.
I am feeling like you missed something. There is no indication that these people are intentionally not wearing masks. None at all. They are not going on about rights or anything else.

What they are doing is living in dangerously overcrowded conditions and suffering from poor quality or nonexistent healthcare because they are very poor. The spread may have as much to do with living conditions as it does with the workplace.
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Old 5th May 2020, 11:15 AM   #86
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
There really are not enough foxes in the neighborhood to eat 2000 chickens. You would basically be unleashing a massive wave of an invasive species into an ecosystem, with not enough food to support them.

The turkey vultures would be pretty happy, though.

And, obviously, doing the same with pigs and cows wouldn't work at all.

In my humble opinion, a bit of planning and perhaps some government subsidization could prevent it, but that isn't happening.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:05 PM   #87
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It's probably illegal to intentionally release domestic livestock animals into the wild.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:09 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
Are you really advocating that farmers *give away* the animals they've invested a lot of time and money into?? There will be an 'after coronavirus', how are you proposing that they replace their livestock then? The whole point of mitigation and social support is so that the farms will still exist after the crisis!
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:23 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by Silly Green Monkey View Post
Are you really advocating that farmers *give away* the animals they've invested a lot of time and money into?? There will be an 'after coronavirus', how are you proposing that they replace their livestock then? The whole point of mitigation and social support is so that the farms will still exist after the crisis!
How does giving the livestock away affect the farmer differently than killing it and allowing the uneaten corpses to rot?
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:27 PM   #90
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
I am feeling like you missed something. There is no indication that these people are intentionally not wearing masks. None at all. They are not going on about rights or anything else.
I don't think I missed anything. We really don't have any idea what these tens (or hundreds) of thousands of meat processing workers do when they leave work. I see that they wear masks at work. We also don't know if they remove the mask for their lunch break at work with others around them doing the same. Maybe a 6 foot distance isn't enough when people are without masks and yapping to each other while on break.

We also have no clue what they think about rights and it isn't decided one way or another if you don't see their faces at protests or on the news.

Quote:
What they are doing is living in dangerously overcrowded conditions and suffering from poor quality or nonexistent healthcare because they are very poor. The spread may have as much to do with living conditions as it does with the workplace.
Are you talking about the kind of poor that can't afford to get their own mask and sanitizer? Neither you nor I know if they wear masks in public when they should be. Some might go without a mask because they don't really fear being punished for not wearing it.

The way I see it, anybody who isn't wearing proper gear and with proper behavior is a "muh rights" person and I don't even care what their personal feelings are. As far as the virus is concerned, they are identical. A MAGA "muh rights" Redneck without a mask is the same as a poor Somali immigrant meat worker without a mask. Both of them can kill others or be killed themselves because this virus is a bitch.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:29 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
So you literally want the chickens coming home to roost?
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:30 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by Silly Green Monkey View Post
Are you really advocating that farmers *give away* the animals they've invested a lot of time and money into?? There will be an 'after coronavirus', how are you proposing that they replace their livestock then? The whole point of mitigation and social support is so that the farms will still exist after the crisis!
Right now they're killing them and letting them rot? Either way they lose those animals, I was figuring at least some of the animals will be hunted and eaten by other people and/or animals.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:32 PM   #93
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Originally Posted by Distracted1 View Post
How does giving the livestock away affect the farmer differently than killing it and allowing the uneaten corpses to rot?
Because when they send them for slaughter they are recouping some of the costs in selling the meat. Most of the farmers who say they have to liquidate their holdings are assuming the slaughterhouses will remain active and buy the meat, perhaps even that the meat-packing plants will stop closing now that the government is going to force those employees back to work. They're not giving the animals away. Most farmers don't have near the capability to kill their animals, they only produce them.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:34 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by Silly Green Monkey View Post
Because when they send them for slaughter they are recouping some of the costs in selling the meat. Most of the farmers who say they have to liquidate their holdings are assuming the slaughterhouses will remain active and buy the meat, perhaps even that the meat-packing plants will stop closing now that the government is going to force those employees back to work. They're not giving the animals away. Most farmers don't have near the capability to kill their animals, they only produce them.
Perhaps I misunderstood the articles I read. I was under the impression that the farmers are killing the animals because they can't afford to feed them, but the slaughterhouses aren't taking them because they've closed down due to COVID. I thought the problem was stemming from the fact that some of the meat processing plants have closed.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:37 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by Meadmaker View Post
Wendy's ran out of beef in some areas of the country.

I'm pretty sure that's not the result of panic buying.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/meat-...234925159.html
Went to the local Kroger affiliate on Friday(west coast). They had everything - chicken, pork and beef. Big sale on pork. Pork shoulder roast (skin on for delicious crackling) was $0.79 a pound.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:39 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Perhaps I misunderstood the articles I read. I was under the impression that the farmers are killing the animals because they can't afford to feed them, but the slaughterhouses aren't taking them because they've closed down due to COVID. I thought the problem was stemming from the fact that some of the meat processing plants have closed.
Dang it now I'm imagining the owner of a battery egg farm standing in front of the henhouses with thousands of hens holding a hatchet...
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:54 PM   #97
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For perspective, it's not unusual for large chicken farms to have up to a million birds and more. More than a hundred thousand birds is common.

You cannot intentionally release those into the wild. It can't be legal and the social ramifications would be extreme.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:55 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Perhaps I misunderstood the articles I read. I was under the impression that the farmers are killing the animals because they can't afford to feed them, but the slaughterhouses aren't taking them because they've closed down due to COVID. I thought the problem was stemming from the fact that some of the meat processing plants have closed.
That's exactly right. The animals are being killed and the bodies disposed of by burying. (So I read. Burning? I don't know. One way or another, they are being killed and not eaten.)

Could the government step in and pay for the cost of transport to an available slaughterhouse, that has some spare capacity, and then either give the meat away or juggle the money so that only the government (i.e. us, i.e taxpayers) end up paying a portion of the cost? I would think so, but I'm sure the details are complicated.
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:59 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by Elagabalus View Post
Went to the local Kroger affiliate on Friday(west coast). They had everything - chicken, pork and beef. Big sale on pork. Pork shoulder roast (skin on for delicious crackling) was $0.79 a pound.
My guess is that the Wendy's shortages are local. The regional Wendy's probably has a contract with one company, perhaps with a backup, to supply a whole heck of a lot of beef from one really big slaughterhouse. If that one goes down, then so do the Wendy's restaurants served by that one.

I've read that the same thing can happen with grocery stores. One distributor loses its shipment, so their stores go without, while the stores across the street have plenty, because their distributor gets the meat from a different facility.


So far, I'm not reading about real crises or real shortages, just inconvenience and difficulty. Even the stories about chickens or pigs being killed and not eaten are mostly small scale, local, problems. I said I would give credit where credit is due if things are still ok this week. It seems like they are. So, Trump and team haven't done anything incredibly stupid, or failed to do the minimum. We'll see how that holds up in the weeks ahead.
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Old 5th May 2020, 01:12 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Okay, so I kind of feel like I'm missing something here. I mean, I totally get the hotspots, and plants closing down and how that disrupts the supply chain. What I'm not getting is farmers killing livestock that isn't being processed. I follow that they can't afford the feed for the animals.

But why can't they just turn them loose and let them fend for themselves?

I mean, let 2000 chickens loose in the area, and the local predators will be really happy. But I'm also betting that there's a lot of people who would be perfectly willing to go "hunt" those chickens and slaughter them on their own. Same with cows. We'll end up with a bunch of cows all over the place, some really satisfied wolves, and a solid grip of hunters willing to hunt and dress those cows for their own (or their neighbor's consumption).

Maybe not an ideal solution, but it seems somewhat better than just killing them all and letting them rot.

So I'm guessing I'm missing some key element in this that makes it not an option. Anyone feel like educating me?
Starvation is a terrible death and thatís what most would face. Itís better just to kill them.. Pigs can actually survive when set free like that, but they become pets that destroy property and damage crops.
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Old 5th May 2020, 01:21 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by lomiller View Post
Starvation is a terrible death and thatís what most would face. Itís better just to kill them.. Pigs can actually survive when set free like that, but they become pets that destroy property and damage crops.
I think you mean pests.

The kind that you eat are also very, very, large, and can run fast. You can't let pigs run around people.
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Old 5th May 2020, 01:26 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by Silly Green Monkey View Post
Because when they send them for slaughter they are recouping some of the costs in selling the meat. Most of the farmers who say they have to liquidate their holdings are assuming the slaughterhouses will remain active and buy the meat, perhaps even that the meat-packing plants will stop closing now that the government is going to force those employees back to work. They're not giving the animals away. Most farmers don't have near the capability to kill their animals, they only produce them.
Yet, I am reading that they are (in some cases) killing animals and composting- or otherwise disposing of- the corpses.
That is not recouping any cost, as selling to the slaughterhouse does, so the question stands. How is giving the animals away substantively different for the producer than wasting them?
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Old 5th May 2020, 02:41 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by William Parcher View Post
For perspective, it's not unusual for large chicken farms to have up to a million birds and more. More than a hundred thousand birds is common.

You cannot intentionally release those into the wild. It can't be legal and the social ramifications would be extreme.
Okay, that's a LOT more chickens than I was imagining.
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Old 5th May 2020, 02:43 PM   #104
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I wonder if my HOA would let me have a couple of hens? I like fresh eggs.






I doubt they'd be okay with me putting a dairy cow int eh back yard though. And I'm really not sure I'm down with milking her every day either.
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Old 5th May 2020, 03:14 PM   #105
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Originally Posted by Distracted1 View Post
Yet, I am reading that they are (in some cases) killing animals and composting- or otherwise disposing of- the corpses.
That is not recouping any cost, as selling to the slaughterhouse does, so the question stands. How is giving the animals away substantively different for the producer than wasting them?
I'd not known that some were resorting to slaughtering the excess stock themselves, but as to why they don't give it away I can only ask---how? A line of people showing up to carry off an animal each? Transport trucks taking them away----to where? Food banks are scattered everywhere, and aren't going to be able to handle a huge sudden influx. All of these options are incompatible with minimizing contacts between large groups of people. Given that this crisis is supposed to be temporary, and we're supposed to be able to pick up again after it's over, we need to provide support for the very bottom, the anchor, of the supply chains, to ensure they don't come loose and break away when we have to put weight on them again.
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Old 5th May 2020, 03:28 PM   #106
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Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
....I doubt they'd be okay with me putting a dairy cow int eh back yard though. And I'm really not sure I'm down with milking her every day either.
Ya gotta getta goat. A goat is about the right size, depending on your yard, and goat milk is under-rated.
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Old 5th May 2020, 03:28 PM   #107
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Why not make the meat-packing jobs safer? It's not like we don't know how to do that.
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Old 5th May 2020, 03:30 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by Skeptic Ginger View Post
Why not make the meat-packing jobs safer? It's not like we don't know how to do that.
That would break more than a century's worth of tradition!!
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Old 5th May 2020, 05:01 PM   #109
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Originally Posted by crescent View Post
That would break more than a century's worth of tradition!!
Where is Upton Sinclair now that we need him?
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Old 7th May 2020, 12:02 PM   #110
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'It's their own fault': HHS Secretary Alex Azar says meat processing workers' 'home and social conditions' are to blame for rapid spread of coronavirus - not their working conditions

Originally Posted by Daily Mail
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar dismissed concerns about the spread of the coronavirus at meat packing plants, saying workers were more likely to catch the deadly disease at home or in social situations.

Azar's remarks were made on a phone call with Democratic and Republican lawmakers and came after President Donald Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to keep meat plants open amid fears of a food shortage.

But the plants have also had high outbreaks of the coronavirus among workers - more than 10,000 have tested positive nationwide with at least 45 deaths.

Some of the lawmakers on the April 28 call with Azar told Politico he said it was the 'home and social' aspects of workers' lives rather than the conditions inside the facilities that led to people catching the disease.

Azar, a member of the White House's Coronavirus Task Force, noted many workers live in group housing, which contributed to the spread, and suggested one solution would be to send in more law enforcement officials to enforce social distancing rules.

Several people on the call interpreted his remarks as blaming the workers.

'He was essentially turning it around, blaming the victim and implying that their lifestyle was the problem,' Democratic Rep. Ann Kuster of New Hampshire told Politico. 'Their theory of the case is that they are not becoming infected in the meat processing plant, they're becoming infected because of the way they live in their home.'

An HHS spokesperson told the news website it doesn't comment on Azar's conversations with lawmakers but called it 'an inaccurate representation of Secretary's Azar's comments during the discussion.'

At least 10,000 meat industry workers have tested positive since the pandemic began, according to an analysis by USA Today and the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting.

At least 170 plants in 29 states have had one or more workers test positive for the coronavirus. Some of those workers also have infected others, which is included in the count.

Most meat packing workers are Latino and many are illegal immigrants.

About 44 percent of meatpackers are Latino, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research and 80 percent are undocumented or refugees, according to an analysis from The League of United Latin American Citizens...
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ad-corona.html
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Old 7th May 2020, 12:07 PM   #111
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Azar, a member of the White House's Coronavirus Task Force, noted many workers live in group housing, which contributed to the spread, and suggested one solution would be to send in more law enforcement officials to enforce social distancing rules.
Earlier I said that the Trump administration hadn't done anything extremely stupid. Let me revise and extend those remarks.


So, this quote here demonstrates that Secretary Azar, and I think we can assume everyone at the top of the Trump coronavirus team, knows that there is a problem. We know there is a problem, and we know that they know, because they are at least considering solutions to the problem.

And we know that their proposed solution is dumb as hell, which is exactly what we would expect.

ETA: Meanwhile, more and more stories in the news about limited selections and higher prices. Still not a real crisis, but definitely a small problem that is threatening to become a big problem. And what is Team Trump doing about it? Well Azar says the above is "an inaccurate representation of Secretary's Azar's comments", but since that's the only thing we've heard, I think we can assume that it is actually a pretty accurate representation. i.e. it is being dismissed as insignificant, and certainly not the fault of anyone important.

Last edited by Meadmaker; 7th May 2020 at 12:11 PM.
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Old 11th May 2020, 11:53 AM   #112
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Originally Posted by Meadmaker View Post
Earlier I said that the Trump administration hadn't done anything extremely stupid. Let me revise and extend those remarks.


So, this quote here demonstrates that Secretary Azar, and I think we can assume everyone at the top of the Trump coronavirus team, knows that there is a problem. We know there is a problem, and we know that they know, because they are at least considering solutions to the problem.

And we know that their proposed solution is dumb as hell, which is exactly what we would expect.

ETA: Meanwhile, more and more stories in the news about limited selections and higher prices. Still not a real crisis, but definitely a small problem that is threatening to become a big problem. And what is Team Trump doing about it? Well Azar says the above is "an inaccurate representation of Secretary's Azar's comments", but since that's the only thing we've heard, I think we can assume that it is actually a pretty accurate representation. i.e. it is being dismissed as insignificant, and certainly not the fault of anyone important.
If it was being dismissed as insignificant why was Defense Production Act invoked.

Up until recently the president may not have been aware (who knows) but I am certain their are people who were watching that supply line as well as many others.
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Old 11th May 2020, 03:15 PM   #113
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Originally Posted by eeyore1954 View Post
If it was being dismissed as insignificant why was Defense Production Act invoked.

Up until recently the president may not have been aware (who knows) but I am certain their are people who were watching that supply line as well as many others.
I think the answer was because invoking the Defense Production Act was the easiest thing to do that didn't actually require a real plan. We have a real issue with meat plants closing down, so issue an executive order that says they have to stay open...Ö.except it doesn't actually say that.

To be fair, while there is some disruption in supply, it still isn't a crisis, so I can't say that his policies have been a disaster in this case. Heck, for all I know, he or his administration may have absolutely done something useful. I'm not aware of it, but it could have happened. It's not like CNN is going to put "Trump Saves Meat Supply" in a headline, so if anyone knows of anything he actually did, as opposed to issuing an insignificant executive order, by all means talk about it here.
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Old 12th May 2020, 04:56 AM   #114
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Originally Posted by Meadmaker View Post
I think the answer was because invoking the Defense Production Act was the easiest thing to do that didn't actually require a real plan. We have a real issue with meat plants closing down, so issue an executive order that says they have to stay open...….except it doesn't actually say that.

To be fair, while there is some disruption in supply, it still isn't a crisis, so I can't say that his policies have been a disaster in this case. Heck, for all I know, he or his administration may have absolutely done something useful. I'm not aware of it, but it could have happened. It's not like CNN is going to put "Trump Saves Meat Supply" in a headline, so if anyone knows of anything he actually did, as opposed to issuing an insignificant executive order, by all means talk about it here.
My main point here is I would believe there are disaster plans that have been in place for years that deal with monitoring this and many supply chains. If not someone has been squandering our tax dollars.
Long before anyone even dreamed of a President Trump.

Quote:
To be fair, while there is some disruption in supply, it still isn't a crisis
Leaving the Trump administration aside, in general do you feel the government should step in if there is some disruption or should they just monitor and be ready if it becomes more than an inconvenience.

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Old 12th May 2020, 05:15 AM   #115
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Obviously something is a badly wrong with the commercial supply chain the US. In the UK we had the same issues with supplies of things like meat, but by and large supermarkets and their supply chains have adapted and if the range of meat products has been narrowed, shops longer carrying 20 different kinds of sausages, availability seems fine, so yeah it sounds like there's a systemic fault in the US chain.
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Old 12th May 2020, 07:53 AM   #116
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Originally Posted by eeyore1954 View Post
Leaving the Trump administration aside, in general do you feel the government should step in if there is some disruption or should they just monitor and be ready if it becomes more than an inconvenience.
They should be aware of the situation well enough to know that a crisis is about to happen, and should intervene to prevent it.

In other words, right at this minute, it is an inconvenience. If it is not likely to be worse than that in the future, then no intervention is necessary, beyond what is already being done. However, the future is pretty predictable, to those with the data. They should be looking ahead, and if it is likely that the situation will get worse, then they should intervene now to prevent it.
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Old 12th May 2020, 09:33 AM   #117
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Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
Obviously something is a badly wrong with the commercial supply chain the US. In the UK we had the same issues with supplies of things like meat, but by and large supermarkets and their supply chains have adapted and if the range of meat products has been narrowed, shops longer carrying 20 different kinds of sausages, availability seems fine, so yeah it sounds like there's a systemic fault in the US chain.
Hmm. I haven't noticed a lack of meat so far, just a reduction in selection as well as customer limits.
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Old 12th May 2020, 12:08 PM   #118
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I've just been to the stores. Meat supplies were near-normal. Pork was a bit sparse my first time by but five minutes later the employee was there filling the case from a big cart-load.
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Old 12th May 2020, 01:21 PM   #119
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Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
Obviously something is a badly wrong with the commercial supply chain the US. In the UK we had the same issues with supplies of things like meat, but by and large supermarkets and their supply chains have adapted and if the range of meat products has been narrowed, shops longer carrying 20 different kinds of sausages, availability seems fine, so yeah it sounds like there's a systemic fault in the US chain.
Except from what I see as of now there are not issues at least not where I live in NY.
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Old 12th May 2020, 02:26 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
Obviously something is a badly wrong with the commercial supply chain the US. In the UK we had the same issues with supplies of things like meat, but by and large supermarkets and their supply chains have adapted and if the range of meat products has been narrowed, shops longer carrying 20 different kinds of sausages, availability seems fine, so yeah it sounds like there's a systemic fault in the US chain.
Originally Posted by Emily's Cat View Post
Hmm. I haven't noticed a lack of meat so far, just a reduction in selection as well as customer limits.
Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
I've just been to the stores. Meat supplies were near-normal. Pork was a bit sparse my first time by but five minutes later the employee was there filling the case from a big cart-load.
Originally Posted by eeyore1954 View Post
Except from what I see as of now there are not issues at least not where I live in NY.

No shortages here in Durham, NC yet, either.

I was at the grocery store yesterday morning and had an abundance of choices, although a two item limit on some of them.

Bought 5 lbs. of chicken breasts (could have gotten 10 with the two item limit, but my freezer is getting full), four different kinds of sausages, and a ham (spiral cut). Also toilet paper, which, I confess, I didn't really need. In my defense there was serendipity involved. I'm probably good on the TP front through at least November. Mebbe 2020.

Anything remotely resembling a disinfectant product was a no go, though. Literally bare shelves.
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Last edited by quadraginta; 12th May 2020 at 02:28 PM.
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