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Old 5th September 2020, 04:14 PM   #41
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Professor loses job for speaking Chinese. Welcome to 2020 .

Originally Posted by Sherkeu View Post
I worked in supplier contracts and was transferred to Baltimore in the 90's. I relaized early on that using the word 'reneged' raised some eyebrows so I had to find ways around saying it. Also the word 'boy' somehow got a reaction if I used it to refer to some adult behavior. Coming from California, I had no clue how racially sensitive other parts of the country were. None of it would cause even the merest blink out this way.

eta: Oh! I do have one from college though. My friend whose speaks portugese from the Azores was calling her buddy a word in her dialect that sounded like "neee-gah' over and over which was a term of endearment. That sounded uncomfortable, even here- but no one, in our very mixed group, said anything.
The Harry Potter books keep using the word "snigger" instead of "snicker" in various ways, and while I never gave it a second thought myself, the Potterless host (whose podcast is based on him reading the HP novels and discussing his thoughts on the books with his podcast guests) points out every single time it appears that it's one letter away from that word. I don't know, I didn't ever think of that, probably because the 's' isn't exactly silent.

Rowling's frequent use of the word "ejaculate" to mean "exclaim" is perhaps a bit more unfortunate .
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Old 5th September 2020, 04:15 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
This and the OP remind me of when Toyota had a model of sports car called the MR2. All well and good, they must have thought; that'll translate easily throughout the world, they must have thought.

Except....

In French, the model name is pronounced "Emm" (M) "Airrr" (R) "duh" (2). Which, if you say it fairly quickly, and strangle the first vowel sound (as is common in colloquial French), you end up saying something which sounds almost identical to the French word "Merdeux". Which means "faeces-y" (but with the s- word instead of faeces)
They also made a model called "Fitta", which is a word for female genitalia in Scandinavian. Heck, the world is full of examples like that, both in terms of words in one language meaning something else in another, and in turns of brand/product names that didn't quite work out when the products hit the international market.
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Old 5th September 2020, 05:00 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Safe-Keeper View Post
Professor loses job for speaking Chinese. Welcome to 2020 .


The Harry Potter books keep using the word "snigger" instead of "snicker" in various ways, and while I never gave it a second thought myself, the Potterless host (whose podcast is based on him reading the HP novels and discussing his thoughts on the books with his podcast guests) points out every single time it appears that it's one letter away from that word. I don't know, I didn't ever think of that, probably because the 's' isn't exactly silent.

Rowling's frequent use of the word "ejaculate" to mean "exclaim" is perhaps a bit more unfortunate .

In British English, the word "snicker" really doesn't exist - in terms of describing a stifled laugh. We use the word "snigger" instead.


On the other hand, Rowling's use of "ejaculate" is truly a harking back to literature of the 19th Century and earlier. You'd virtually never see the word used to mean "exclaim" in any written work these days, and you'd certainly never hear it spoken in that context.

I suspect (though I haven't read any of those children's books, on account of being an adult when they were published....) that Rowling has delved into the thesaurus in order to find alternative words to describe the act of a character speaking something - "Jack said xyz, Paul said ABC, John exclaimed YYZ!, Dave said gjh, Larry exclaimed XXX!" can get awfully repetitive for the reader. Though on the other hand, most serious fiction writers and editors have something of a pet hate of taking this sort of "thesaurus lucky dip" approach to writing. Fortunately for Rowling, she's not a very good author, so obviously the "proper writer" rules don't apply to her
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Old 5th September 2020, 06:20 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by Checkmite View Post
Yeah I'm going to need to see some evidence that Greg Patton is a native speaker who was speaking in his native Chinese when he specifically invoked the idiom as an example during the lesson. His LinkedIn page and quite impressive CV don't give any indication that he is Chinese or had any pre-professional connection or interaction with China.
Still not seeing the blunder. Having watched the video now I can't see any blunder. He's literally explaining filler words. Is it a blunder to tell people about how filler words work in Chinese? He says, in Chinese people will say nage nage nage to fill in empty spaces. There's literally no room for confusion. He's telling them about the Chinese language.
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Old 6th September 2020, 03:48 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by Checkmite View Post
The problem with that incident is that "niggardly" has been outmoded English since the early 20th century, and the official who used it was not old enough to have been around during a time when it was actually in use. So the impression is of a person who knew about this archaic word and was not only well aware of the potential for misunderstanding, but was in fact counting on it so that he'd have a chance to call offended black people ignorant for not knowing the word.
I think that is really reaching. He might for instance be a reader of older books, it might have been a word used by his grandmother and so on.
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Old 6th September 2020, 04:26 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
This and the OP remind me of when Toyota had a model of sports car called the MR2. All well and good, they must have thought; that'll translate easily throughout the world, they must have thought.

Except....

In French, the model name is pronounced "Emm" (M) "Airrr" (R) "duh" (2). Which, if you say it fairly quickly, and strangle the first vowel sound (as is common in colloquial French), you end up saying something which sounds almost identical to the French word "Merdeux". Which means "faeces-y" (but with the s- word instead of faeces)
Actually, I think it’s that it sounds like “emmerdeur”, which means the equivalent of ‘pain in the arse’.
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Old 6th September 2020, 04:31 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
In British English, the word "snicker" really doesn't exist - in terms of describing a stifled laugh. We use the word "snigger" instead.
Yes, that's what I thought, that it was simply a regular UK English word.

Quote:
I suspect (though I haven't read any of those children's books, on account of being an adult when they were published....) (...) Fortunately for Rowling, she's not a very good author, so obviously the "proper writer" rules don't apply to her
You haven't read the books, but you know she isn't a very good author ?
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Old 6th September 2020, 05:10 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Safe-Keeper View Post
Yes, that's what I thought, that it was simply a regular UK English word.

You haven't read the books, but you know she isn't a very good author ?

I've read some excerpts. And I've read some respected literary criticism of her work
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Old 6th September 2020, 05:19 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
This and the OP remind me of when Toyota had a model of sports car called the MR2. All well and good, they must have thought; that'll translate easily throughout the world, they must have thought.

Except....

In French, the model name is pronounced "Emm" (M) "Airrr" (R) "duh" (2). Which, if you say it fairly quickly, and strangle the first vowel sound (as is common in colloquial French), you end up saying something which sounds almost identical to the French word "Merdeux". Which means "faeces-y" (but with the s- word instead of faeces)
My older brother has a different mother than I. His mother is from France. His middle daughter's name is Merideth. For the above reason, her grandmother refused to call her by name, insted calling her, "Mary Beth". When my brother (Who also speaks fluent french) asked her why she wasn't saying Merideth, she replied in english, "I will not call my granddaughter, ****!"
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Old 6th September 2020, 11:17 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
I suspect (though I haven't read any of those children's books, on account of being an adult when they were published....) that Rowling has delved into the thesaurus in order to find alternative words to describe the act of a character speaking something - "Jack said xyz, Paul said ABC, John exclaimed YYZ!, Dave said gjh, Larry exclaimed XXX!" can get awfully repetitive for the reader.
Actually in modern writing you should rarely stray from the "said" dialogue tag.

Generally you would set the characters in the scene by using said, and then drop the dialogue tags a together unless you had a need to reestablish who was talking, and even then you should really do it by introducing an action rather than a dialogue tag. Dialogue tags are telling not showing, and so using the near invisible "said" is the preferred way to go.

You might do something like this....

Quote:
The door creaked as it opened, and Mr Chambers, the downstairs butler shuffled in, his face pale, lines etched in his creased brow.
"Um... Your L.. Lordship," he said, stammering over the words. "There is a man downstairs to see you."
Lord Snedon's face turned similar in colour to his red locks and he stabbed his quill's nib into the blotter protecting the mahogany table. "I gave very clear instructions that I was not to be disturbed!"
Chambers shuffled his feet, tugging at his collar. "Yes, your Lordship, only he was quite adamant that he speak with you immediately. He says he has a message directly from the King himself."
"Very well, I shall be down in a minute. Hurry and tell this visitor that I will address him shortly, and that I expect his message will be of utmost import for such a rude interruption of my duties."
Chambers nodded quickly. "Yes Sir," he said fleeing from the room and pulling the door shut behind him.
Anyways, turning this into dialogue writing 101 is a little beyond the discussion so back to the OP. Yeah some words sound like over words in other languages. People need to get over that. And on the funny side. The Chevy Nova is Spanish means "Chevy, it doesn't go." Opps.
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Old 6th September 2020, 11:51 PM   #51
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I'd like to tell you a joke.

A doctor, a priest, and an artilleryman are playing golf. The doctor hit the ball, and it hooked far to the left. The priest hit the ball, and it sliced off to the right. "I got a hole in one!" yelled the artilleryman.

We're very new at tweaking the language to eliminate gender and racial biases. We've only been doing it for a couple of decades, which in terms of language evolution is almost no time at all. And it's an ongoing process. Sometimes we'll go too far in one direction, sometimes we'll go too far in the other. But like artillery, we have to bracket the target with several badly-aimed shots in order to narrow in, and in time, we should be able to come to a compromise that works in a majority of situations.

It is a shame that a badly aimed shot may cost someone their job, though. It would be nice for that not to be necessary.
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Old 7th September 2020, 12:06 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post
I'd like to tell you a joke.



A doctor, a priest, and an artilleryman are playing golf. The doctor hit the ball, and it hooked far to the left. The priest hit the ball, and it sliced off to the right. "I got a hole in one!" yelled the artilleryman.



We're very new at tweaking the language to eliminate gender and racial biases. We've only been doing it for a couple of decades, which in terms of language evolution is almost no time at all. And it's an ongoing process. Sometimes we'll go too far in one direction, sometimes we'll go too far in the other. But like artillery, we have to bracket the target with several badly-aimed shots in order to narrow in, and in time, we should be able to come to a compromise that works in a majority of situations.



It is a shame that a badly aimed shot may cost someone their job, though. It would be nice for that not to be necessary.
ArtilleryMAN?

Sickening sexism.

Not to mention artillerytransperson

(I'm joking!)
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Old 7th September 2020, 12:18 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by cullennz View Post
ArtilleryMAN?

Sickening sexism.

Not to mention artillerytransperson

(I'm joking!)
Of course you are, but you are inadvertently right. The appropriate term is artillerist. I think.
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Old 7th September 2020, 01:18 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
On the other hand, Rowling's use of "ejaculate" is truly a harking back to literature of the 19th Century and earlier.
It persisted well into the 20th Century, I think; I'm pretty sure I've seen that usage in Biggles stories.

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Old 7th September 2020, 02:05 AM   #55
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post

It is a shame that a badly aimed shot may cost someone their job, though. It would be nice for that not to be necessary.
The thing is, it's not actually necessary. He did nothing worse than explain how a filler word in Chinese is used, and was clear that that's what he was saying. The fact that it sounds similar to a racist slur doesn't matter since he made it very clear that he was using a Chinese word and then said that Chinese word. There's no reasonable misunderstanding here.
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Old 7th September 2020, 04:31 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by arthwollipot View Post

It is a shame that a badly aimed shot may cost someone their job, though. It would be nice for that not to be necessary.
Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
The thing is, it's not actually necessary.
Yeah, I fail to see how any of this is necessary.
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Old 7th September 2020, 05:00 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
The thing is, it's not actually necessary. He did nothing worse than explain how a filler word in Chinese is used, and was clear that that's what he was saying. The fact that it sounds similar to a racist slur doesn't matter since he made it very clear that he was using a Chinese word and then said that Chinese word. There's no reasonable misunderstanding here.
I see the flaw in your application of logic here. Trying to use reason these days is a fools errand.
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Old 7th September 2020, 08:04 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by Roboramma View Post
The thing is, it's not actually necessary. He did nothing worse than explain how a filler word in Chinese is used, and was clear that that's what he was saying. The fact that it sounds similar to a racist slur doesn't matter since he made it very clear that he was using a Chinese word and then said that Chinese word. There's no reasonable misunderstanding here.
Sorry, "necessary" was kind of the wrong word for what I was trying to express. "Consequence" would probably be better. "Predictable consequence" maybe. "Inevitable consequence"? I don't know. Language is hard, sometimes.
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Old 8th September 2020, 06:46 AM   #59
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I wonder what sort of horror awaits teachers of the Turkish language? There is a Turkish female name - Nigar (pronounced nee-Gar).
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Old 8th September 2020, 07:13 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by Monza View Post
I wonder what sort of horror awaits teachers of the Turkish language? There is a Turkish female name - Nigar (pronounced nee-Gar).
On the first day of class, Nigar's teacher will tell her that her new name is "Maryanne."
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Old 8th September 2020, 07:31 AM   #61
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Well, as of right now, Patton remains listed (and lauded) on the USC Marshall website:

https://www.marshall.usc.edu/personnel/greg-patton


And here is a link which refers to a letter written to the LA Times by a group of 102 USC Marshall alumni, which severely criticises Marshall's initial response to the incident:

https://reason.com/2020/09/07/letter...n-controversy/
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Old 8th September 2020, 10:22 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
Well, as of right now, Patton remains listed (and lauded) on the USC Marshall website:

https://www.marshall.usc.edu/personnel/greg-patton


And here is a link which refers to a letter written to the LA Times by a group of 102 USC Marshall alumni, which severely criticises Marshall's initial response to the incident:

https://reason.com/2020/09/07/letter...n-controversy/
Good line, this one

Quote:
We are also deeply disappointed that the spurious charge has the additional feature of casting insult toward the Chinese language, the most spoken in the world, and characterized it and its usage as vile. We feel Marshall should be open to diversity in all areas—not only those areas convenient for the moment. We further suggest that any attempt to degrade this matter and suggest that a Chinese word different in sound, tone, accent, context and language itself is "exactly like" an offensive US term would be naive, a disgusting and intentional stretch and would further degrade important societal discussion.
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Old 8th September 2020, 12:37 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by pharphis View Post
Good line, this one

Ha yeah. It does seem very odd that nothing seems to have changed over the past couple of days - in either direction.

I can't imagine that this wait will have turned up anything other than that it was a clear use of a familiar Mandarin "pause to think" part of speech, and that therefore his use of it (and his pronunciation) was intended to be in that context*. And as a result, I can't see how he won't get reinstated, together with an apology.

However, I wonder if USC Marshall are actually now taking this time to strategise their next move. After all, if they admit that their suspension - together with its very public announcement - was an error, they clearly leave themselves wide open to a (justifiable) legal claim for defamation from Patton. So perhaps they are trying to figure out a way to mitigate or remove that risk - either in the way in which they frame his reinstatement, or...... by trying to obtain (manufacture?) additional evidence to bolster their original judgement such that they terminate him.


* Though in my view (as I think I mentioned before), it's still not impossible that additional good evidence exists that Patton did have intent to use this as a way of "getting away with" using the n-word to a class of students. He may, for example, have talked about it with a colleague; or he may have previous form in either the use of racist language or other related transgressions. I'm not suggesting that any such evidence does exist - it's just that I don't think we can say definitively that it does not/cannot exist.
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Old 8th September 2020, 01:14 PM   #64
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"What do you call a person who speaks only one language?... American.”

now we must add:

"What do you call a person who speaks only one language and refuses to let other languages use words that sound offensive?... American.”
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Old 8th September 2020, 09:40 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
Ha yeah. It does seem very odd that nothing seems to have changed over the past couple of days - in either direction.

I can't imagine that this wait will have turned up anything other than that it was a clear use of a familiar Mandarin "pause to think" part of speech, and that therefore his use of it (and his pronunciation) was intended to be in that context*. And as a result, I can't see how he won't get reinstated, together with an apology.

However, I wonder if USC Marshall are actually now taking this time to strategise their next move. After all, if they admit that their suspension - together with its very public announcement - was an error, they clearly leave themselves wide open to a (justifiable) legal claim for defamation from Patton. So perhaps they are trying to figure out a way to mitigate or remove that risk - either in the way in which they frame his reinstatement, or...... by trying to obtain (manufacture?) additional evidence to bolster their original judgement such that they terminate him.


* Though in my view (as I think I mentioned before), it's still not impossible that additional good evidence exists that Patton did have intent to use this as a way of "getting away with" using the n-word to a class of students. He may, for example, have talked about it with a colleague; or he may have previous form in either the use of racist language or other related transgressions. I'm not suggesting that any such evidence does exist - it's just that I don't think we can say definitively that it does not/cannot exist.
I believe some of the comments from the letter in the article mentioned that he had used this example in the past, so it's certainly not a new thing if he's doing it for thrills.

But hell, does it even matter? What if he made this connection in language, thought it would be funny or thrilling or whatever to get away with saying a word that sounds like another word? Does it matter? It was obviously relevant-enough to the subject (and university/college professors generally have a lot of leeway on this). I struggle to see how it's any worse than, say, a sexual innuendo pun or something built into the lesson. He wasn't calling anyone in specific a name or referring to a group of people.
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:36 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by pharphis View Post
I believe some of the comments from the letter in the article mentioned that he had used this example in the past, so it's certainly not a new thing if he's doing it for thrills.

But hell, does it even matter? What if he made this connection in language, thought it would be funny or thrilling or whatever to get away with saying a word that sounds like another word? Does it matter? It was obviously relevant-enough to the subject (and university/college professors generally have a lot of leeway on this). I struggle to see how it's any worse than, say, a sexual innuendo pun or something built into the lesson. He wasn't calling anyone in specific a name or referring to a group of people.


Yeah, intent obviously DOES matter. A lot.

If* Patton had done something like communicate to a colleague how much fun he found it to be able to say something which sounded like the n-word, and especially when some of his students were black, then this would make a huge difference to the situation. Of course it would.


* Again, for the avoidance of doubt, I'm categorically NOT suggesting that Patton actually did do something like this. I'm making the point that it's reasonable to suggest that we outside observers cannot currently know whether there might be (or might not be) other evidence which has the capability of playing a significant factor in this case.
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:39 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
Yeah, intent obviously DOES matter. A lot.

If* Patton had done something like communicate to a colleague how much fun he found it to be able to say something which sounded like the n-word, and especially when some of his students were black, then this would make a huge difference to the situation. Of course it would.


* Again, for the avoidance of doubt, I'm categorically NOT suggesting that Patton actually did do something like this. I'm making the point that it's reasonable to suggest that we outside observers cannot currently know whether there might be (or might not be) other evidence which has the capability of playing a significant factor in this case.
An example of the SWJ/PC mob mindset being in the wrong and a detriment to society.
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:44 AM   #68
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ETA: as a relevant example, not long after I started my first job after uni, another person in my graduate intake communicated with us (his cohort) that he delighted in talking with a young female member of the admin staff, and telling her that he'd like to give her a "pearl necklace". She obviously thought he was referring to a gift of elegant jewellery - but he was referring to a distasteful slang term for (well, I assume perhaps that most people know - or if not, can guess - what it refers to in a slang sexual context). I found it distasteful and very unfair on the woman in question (on various grounds), but I didn't take it further because I assumed (hoped) that he'd soon get bored of doing it.

This guy had discussed it with various of us face-to-face, and he'd also alluded to it a couple of times in emails. Somebody else overheard him talking about it in the office, and informed HR. Several of his cohort - me included - were called in to be questioned over what he'd said to us. And the emails were found. As a direct result of this evidence of intent (and evidence that his intent had never been to discuss an item of jewellery) he was given a formal written warning.
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:48 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by rockysmith76 View Post
An example of the SWJ/PC mob mindset being in the wrong and a detriment to society.

Disagree. Fundamentally. You seriously hold the belief that even if evidence existed of Patton's intent (in this instance, to speak a term of racial abuse, disguised as a Mandarin terms), it wouldn't then be right to consider his act as misconduct??


(See my previous post about the "pearl necklace" as well)
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:54 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by LondonJohn View Post
Disagree. Fundamentally. You seriously hold the belief that even if evidence existed of Patton's intent (in this instance, to speak a term of racial abuse, disguised as a Mandarin terms), it wouldn't then be right to consider his act as misconduct??
No, it's a simple liberal overreaction, and the Chinese have never been racist? Their treatment of their own Muslim population and other Non Chinese. really?

Too many Professors are getting mugged by the PC agenda, and College at one time was a place where kids got confronted with a whole array of ideas, including the disturbing to help them develop into more well rounded adults as opposed to the Space Space inhabitants we see today.
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Old 9th September 2020, 05:02 AM   #71
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Originally Posted by rockysmith76 View Post
No, it's a simple liberal overreaction, and the Chinese have never been racist? Their treatment of their own Muslim population and other Non Chinese. really?

Too many Professors are getting mugged by the PC agenda, and College at one time was a place where kids got confronted with a whole array of ideas, including the disturbing to help them develop into more well rounded adults as opposed to the Space Space inhabitants we see today.


Wait: what?! What on Earth does this have to do with anything in this thread?!

As for the remainder of your post, uhhh well.... I suppose it might be fair to say that it demonstrates a poor grasp of the issue (and the issue under immediate discussion is this: if evidence were to exist that Patton was deliberately and knowingly disguising an inflammatory racial slur, would this have any bearing on the way people (and USC Marshall) should/would assess his behaviour?).
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Old 9th September 2020, 05:05 AM   #72
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Originally Posted by rockysmith76 View Post
No, it's a simple liberal overreaction, and the Chinese have never been racist? Their treatment of their own Muslim population and other Non Chinese. really?

Too many Professors are getting mugged by the PC agenda, and College at one time was a place where kids got confronted with a whole array of ideas, including the disturbing to help them develop into more well rounded adults as opposed to the Space Space inhabitants we see today.
When was this?
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Old 9th September 2020, 05:08 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by Darat View Post
When was this?
70s, 80s part of the 90s, before the PC mob ruined the whole system.
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Old 9th September 2020, 12:47 PM   #74
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Curious, I remember as a kid that adults were complaining about PC nonsense having taken over colleges in the 70s. Interesting that it's been pushed back now, perhaps in the 2050s we now will be living in the last golden age before PC!

Or perhaps we will ditch the term as useless, because it doesn't describe the speech presented as correct by the Party, disseminated through rightwing screeching heads.
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Old 9th September 2020, 02:06 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by Meadmaker View Post
This is the kind of story that, even in this day and age, I have to believe has some sort of element missing from the reporting.

Can USC be that stupid? I hope not.
My take is that there was a complaint filed which triggers an automatic review while the professor is not even suspended, just taken from the classroom pending review.

I assume the same would happen if a sexual harassment claim was submitted because a vet professor said “bitch.”

Silly in this case, but just a procedure to make sure complaints don’t fall through the cracks
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Old 9th September 2020, 02:38 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Checkmite View Post
The problem with that incident is that "niggardly" has been outmoded English since the early 20th century, and the official who used it was not old enough to have been around during a time when it was actually in use. So the impression is of a person who knew about this archaic word and was not only well aware of the potential for misunderstanding, but was in fact counting on it so that he'd have a chance to call offended black people ignorant for not knowing the word.
I've been exposed to the term niggardly many times over the course of my life, and I'm not *that* old. Anyone with a reasonably decent vocabulary should have run across it somewhere.

I think your assumption of malicious intent is... well... a poor assumption.
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Old 9th September 2020, 03:39 PM   #77
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Originally Posted by autumn1971 View Post
My take is that there was a complaint filed which triggers an automatic review while the professor is not even suspended, just taken from the classroom pending review.

I assume the same would happen if a sexual harassment claim was submitted because a vet professor said “bitch.”

Silly in this case, but just a procedure to make sure complaints don’t fall through the cracks


Yes, I'd broadly agree with this analysis. There are two caveats though:

1) As others have also said, it seems odd that uni management would not have been able to take a quick appraisal of this incident (probably in conjunction with native Mandarin speakers on its staff) such that they didn't even need to remove Patton from teaching - though I've mentioned before that there may have been other factors (that we don't currently know about) which warranted fuller investigation

2) Why - a few days now after the incidence - has a decision seemingly still not been made? Again, this might potentially be due to the presence of other factors about which we've not yet been made aware
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Old 10th September 2020, 01:04 AM   #78
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This whole thing is bizarre. Anyone who's ever listened to two Chinese people talking has most likely heard one or both of them, at some point, saying "Na ge, na ge, na ge…" and wondered why they're using that word so much. It's noticeable enough that I would have thought an explanation would result in less offence, not more.

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Old 10th September 2020, 01:38 AM   #79
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Originally Posted by Dave Rogers View Post
This whole thing is bizarre. Anyone who's ever listened to two Chinese people talking has most likely heard one or both of them, at some point, saying "Na ge, na ge, na ge…" and wondered why they're using that word so much. It's noticeable enough that I would have thought an explanation would result in less offence, not more.

Dave

I agree. But as I said, it might be* that there is other evidence, of which we observers are not yet aware, which supports the suggestion that he deliberately used the phrase in order to "allow" him to utter something which sounded close to the n-word. And we also have no understanding at all whether there may be previous form.


* Please note that I'm not claiming that there is any such other evidence - merely that IMO it's a possibility that cannot be entirely ruled out at the moment.
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Old 10th September 2020, 02:41 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by rockysmith76 View Post
70s, 80s part of the 90s, before the PC mob ruined the whole system.
You need to go back and look at the actual history of what university was like.
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