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Old 15th September 2020, 08:29 AM   #41
Jim_MDP
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
Kudos to you for being so magnanimous. (I'm being sincere here, not sarcastic). I for one think (if true) it's an incredible, even appalling, waste of time and effort. Granted, there are many people that spend weeks, months, or years training to achieve a certain goal. But most of the time those goals benefit oneself or society. I don't seen the ultimate benefit here.
Look... magnanimity and empathy overcame me and I gave in to the impulse.
I won't apologize and don't expect a recurrence.
Now get off my ass about it. Embarrassing enough as it is.


.


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Last edited by Jim_MDP; 15th September 2020 at 08:31 AM.
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Old 15th September 2020, 04:23 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
No because that's just your paraphrase of "superhuman".
It's an impressive feat, to be sure, but no reason to go overboard.
Congratulate the man on the years he dedicated to this task. I do. But just because I, and I suspect most, lack the memory (not to mention the free time) to do the same thing is no reason to believe there aren't many, many people who could.
It's a tremendous feat of rote memorization. Cool.
Well, if remembering 2 million words or so is "no reason to go overboard" I might say you are really a tough guy hard to impress. As I said, I dont know of people who have actually shown to be able to remember more than the whole content of the Qran (apparently, less than 100000 words, so less than 1/20 of that).

Originally Posted by sackett View Post
No, MMarco, you don't touch any nerves; on the contrary, you create a tired impatience, a weary feeling of, "Aw man, here comes another claim for nothing much, backed up by much nothing." That hardly rises to the level of hostility.
Well, I have quoted the Guinness of World Records, not really a Scientific Journal but at least not just a spurious claim either.
If your level of "tired impatience" is triggered by a simple question and a few extra comments I must say you have a really low threshold for that..


Originally Posted by theprestige View Post

It might help advance the discussion further if you could provide a citation for what is currently believed as possible. The consensus of the responses you've received so far seems to be that it's unlikely, unproven, but within what's currently believed as possible.
I already did but I will do it again.
The longest text that people seem to be able to remember with evidence (as far as I have found out in the web) is less than 100000 words long.
The Qran is said to be less than 80000 words long and there are a very few people being able to remember the whole Qran word by word.
I dont know of any person in history who has been able to memorize the Bible, for example, which is less than 800 thousands words long.
Many people apparently tried, but no one has been proven able to remember the whole Bible by heart.
The whole Tipitaka is apparently over 2 million words long in its English translation, that is, around 25 longer than the Qran and about 2.5 times longer.
My question is if someone knows of any (other) human being being able to remember a text of at least 1 million words long.
If not, I dont see any problem of seeing this feat (if true) as "way beyond what people usually consider as possible".

Originally Posted by Leftus View Post
Listening to some 80's music right now. I know an astonishingly large amount of the lyrics. Does it not count because it's not one work, or because I didn't learn it by reading a lyrics sheet?

Most of the works that came out of the middle ages were entirely stored in human brains. The main difference is that we don't need bards and storytellers to memorize all of their works anymore. We have YouTube and Netflix and other VOD.
A usual song of the 80s or of the 90s may have lyrics 200-300 words long
So it would take about 2 million/200 roughly equal to 10000 songs to make the same amount of content
Roughly.
If you do know the lyrics of 10000 songs by heart and be able to recite it at random without mistakes I strongly advice you to go to some TV show and to show off your abilities.
You would make tons of $$ I believe.
I am barely able to remember the lyrics of one single song and it took me ages to remember
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Old 15th September 2020, 04:46 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I already did but I will do it again.
Thank you. I know it's a pain, and I appreciate you being willing to repeat yourself.

Quote:
The longest text that people seem to be able to remember with evidence (as far as I have found out in the web) is less than 100000 words long.
The Qran is said to be less than 80000 words long and there are a very few people being able to remember the whole Qran word by word.
I dont know of any person in history who has been able to memorize the Bible, for example, which is less than 800 thousands words long.
Many people apparently tried, but no one has been proven able to remember the whole Bible by heart.
The whole Tipitaka is apparently over 2 million words long in its English translation, that is, around 25 longer than the Qran and about 2.5 times longer.
My question is if someone knows of any (other) human being being able to remember a text of at least 1 million words long.
If not, I dont see any problem of seeing this feat (if true) as "way beyond what people usually consider as possible".
The only problem I see here is that you're attributing to people in general a conclusion that is actually yours alone. You think, based on the evidence you've found, that this is (if true)way beyond what you usually consider as possible.

Personally I tend to think it's unlikely, but probably not impossible. Given that it's an extraordinary claim and it lacks good evidence, my assumption is that it probably didn't happen as claimed.

If there were good evidence that it did happen, I guess people would have to re-evaluate the limits of what they consider as possible. I'm okay with that. It's kind of how evidence and science are supposed to work.
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Old 15th September 2020, 08:44 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
...
I am barely able to remember the lyrics of one single song and it took me ages to remember
You're just listening to the wrong music.

"Hot stuff.
Hot stuff.
Lookin' for some hot stuff baby this evenin'.
Lookin' for some hot stuff baby tonight.
Hot stuff.
Hot stuff.
Yeah, yeah."
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Old 15th September 2020, 08:48 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
My question is if someone knows of any (other) human being being able to remember a text of at least 1 million words long.
If not, I dont see any problem of seeing this feat (if true) as "way beyond what people usually consider as possible".
I have provided a link regarding a girl who has memorised all of the Harry Potter books. The total word count being over a million as shown by another link.
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Old 15th September 2020, 09:54 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Well, if remembering 2 million words or so is "no reason to go overboard" I might say you are really a tough guy hard to impress. As I said, I dont know of people who have actually shown to be able to remember more than the whole content of the Qran (apparently, less than 100000 words, so less than 1/20 of that).







Well, I have quoted the Guinness of World Records, not really a Scientific Journal but at least not just a spurious claim either.

If your level of "tired impatience" is triggered by a simple question and a few extra comments I must say you have a really low threshold for that..









I already did but I will do it again.

The longest text that people seem to be able to remember with evidence (as far as I have found out in the web) is less than 100000 words long.

The Qran is said to be less than 80000 words long and there are a very few people being able to remember the whole Qran word by word.

I dont know of any person in history who has been able to memorize the Bible, for example, which is less than 800 thousands words long.

Many people apparently tried, but no one has been proven able to remember the whole Bible by heart.

The whole Tipitaka is apparently over 2 million words long in its English translation, that is, around 25 longer than the Qran and about 2.5 times longer.

My question is if someone knows of any (other) human being being able to remember a text of at least 1 million words long.

If not, I dont see any problem of seeing this feat (if true) as "way beyond what people usually consider as possible".







A usual song of the 80s or of the 90s may have lyrics 200-300 words long

So it would take about 2 million/200 roughly equal to 10000 songs to make the same amount of content

Roughly.

If you do know the lyrics of 10000 songs by heart and be able to recite it at random without mistakes I strongly advice you to go to some TV show and to show off your abilities.

You would make tons of $$ I believe.

I am barely able to remember the lyrics of one single song and it took me ages to remember
Ok, now that you have over 15 posts and can post links... it's time to do so.
You have NOT quoted Guiness and neither I nor Roland could easily find the entry. The wiki says next to nothing and the single citation there (not a link to Guiness) throws up a security alert for me. I'll let someone else follow that one.

And by the way "citation" doesn't mean your recollection of something. It means to post the direct link to your source so others can read it themselves. Some of those dozens or hundreds of folks who've done the Quran would be good too. Some might have expert opinion on the challenge involved. Cite any other text you think forwards your case as well (vids or YouTube as evidence is frowned upon here btw).
We love to be amazed, but you gotta bring the goods.
Right... the floor is yours, as it were.
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:42 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
The longest text that people seem to be able to remember with evidence (as far as I have found out in the web) is less than 100,000 words long.
The Iliad (or song of Illium) is Homer's orally recited poem of the Trojan Wars memorised by many bards from ancient Greece . It has 148,045 words. The same bards had to remember the Odyssey, which is approximately the same size.

You need to learn basic research skills before making further claims.
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:44 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Well, if remembering 2 million words or so is "no reason to go overboard" I might say you are really a tough guy hard to impress.
If true it's impressive, but I too don't consider it worthy of the degree of astonishment you appear to be experiencing. I also tend to agree with alfanier that anyone who actually achieved it ought to find something better to do with their time and skills. Any utility such an ability might once have had disappeared when writing was invented.
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:45 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Thank you. I know it's a pain, and I appreciate you being willing to repeat yourself.
You are welcome

Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
The only problem I see here is that you're attributing to people in general a conclusion that is actually yours alone. You think, based on the evidence you've found, that this is (if true)way beyond what you usually consider as possible.
I dont know of any evidence (do you?) of one single human being who has been able to remember word by word, say, the Holy Bible.
And the Holy Bible is AFAIK about one third of the Tipitaka.
Again, if such a feat (if true) fails to impression I dont know what it would

Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
Personally I tend to think it's unlikely, but probably not impossible. Given that it's an extraordinary claim and it lacks good evidence, my assumption is that it probably didn't happen as claimed.
Possibly you are right but this is a totally different point.

Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
If there were good evidence that it did happen, I guess people would have to re-evaluate the limits of what they consider as possible. I'm okay with that. It's kind of how evidence and science are supposed to work.
Yes, so now you seem to agree with me that people would not usually consider this feat (if true) as possible while above you stated that it is only me who would consider this as not possible so I see a contradiction here.

Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
The Iliad (or song of Illium) is Homer's orally recited poem of the Trojan Wars memorised by many bards from ancient Greece . It has 148,045 words. The same bards had to remember the Odyssey, which is approximately the same size.

You need to learn basic research skills before making further claims.
And you would need to count a little bit better .
148000 words is not*so-slightly-below* 2000000-plus words.
So a little bit of math knowledge would be required here.
Something like "hundreds of thousands is way less than millions" and so on..
Let alone the fact that I see no evidence that bards were able to remember the Ilium in ancient times

Last edited by MMarco; 15th September 2020 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:49 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Mingun Sayadaw, a Myanmar monk who in 1954 has been able to (apparently) flawless recall and recite all the content from the 16000 pages of the Tipitaka in front of other people.
What books and language and version are claiming Mingun Sayadaw memorised and recited?

You actually don't know. Is that correct?
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:52 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
What books and language and version are claiming Mingun Sayadaw memorised and recited?

You actually don't know. Is that correct?
Oh.. I dont know about so many things here.
This is why I came here asking.
I did not know you people would take it so personally.
I dont know much and this feat seems impressive to me (maybe only to me but..) so I came here to see if people knew more than me on the subject.
This is why..
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:58 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
Ok, now that you have over 15 posts and can post links... it's time to do so.
You have NOT quoted Guiness and neither I nor Roland could easily find the entry. The wiki says next to nothing and the single citation there (not a link to Guiness) throws up a security alert for me. I'll let someone else follow that one.

And by the way "citation" doesn't mean your recollection of something. It means to post the direct link to your source so others can read it themselves. Some of those dozens or hundreds of folks who've done the Quran would be good too. Some might have expert opinion on the challenge involved. Cite any other text you think forwards your case as well (vids or YouTube as evidence is frowned upon here btw).
We love to be amazed, but you gotta bring the goods.
Right... the floor is yours, as it were.
I was thinking it is quite easy to find the entry by using the info provided and I could not copy the link at the time so let me do it now..
https://archive.org/details/1986guin...q=human+memory
The entry is on the left
The same line seems to be in the 1991 edition as well
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Old 15th September 2020, 10:59 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by alfaniner View Post
You're just listening to the wrong music.

"Hot stuff.
Hot stuff.
Lookin' for some hot stuff baby this evenin'.
Lookin' for some hot stuff baby tonight.
Hot stuff.
Hot stuff.
Yeah, yeah."
This may be even easier to remember
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNYcviXK4rg
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Old 15th September 2020, 11:06 PM   #54
Matthew Ellard
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Oh.. I dont know about so many things here.
So you don't actually have clue how many words the Mingun Sayadaw memorised as you don't know the actual books or language or version he memorised.

Do you think someone from Burma, in the 1950s, had to remember all the Sino-Nippon commentaries that are included in the books translated into English in the 1980s?
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Old 15th September 2020, 11:24 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I did not know you people would take it so personally.
We don't. You are making an extraordinary claim on a skeptic debating forum and don't even know what books, version or language the Mingun Sayadaw is meant to have remembered.

"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence” - Carl Sagan
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Old 15th September 2020, 11:35 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
This may be even easier to remember
This may be even easier to remember.......something you forgot to mention that I already identified, as Homer used the same technique in the Iliad.

Many suttas ( in the Tipitaka) contain repetitive passages. Read the sutta as you would a piece of music: when you sing or listen to a song, you don't skip over each chorus; likewise, when you read a sutta, you shouldn't skip over the refrains. As in music, the refrains in the suttas often contain unexpected — and important — variations that you don't want to miss.
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Old 16th September 2020, 12:11 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
I was thinking it is quite easy to find the entry by using the info provided and I could not copy the link at the time so let me do it now..

https://archive.org/details/1986guin...q=human+memory

The entry is on the left

The same line seems to be in the 1991 edition as well
Again with the two sentence Guiness description. And under a different name. At least the excerpt Roland pulled from the PDF (I won't grab it on this phone, they're hell to read on a little screen) goes into detail of how the task was achieved.
Not eidetic memory but rote memorization. Are you looking to ascribe some mystical cause or divine assist? Or has this one just grabbed your fancy?
Impressive? Hells yeah. Lots of things I can't do are. Actually, that's a pretty low bar.
Interesting? Ehh... 3/10.

Rolond... did that file say how long he took? (may have to ask this again if he doesn't see it here)
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Old 16th September 2020, 12:28 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
We don't. You are making an extraordinary claim on a skeptic debating forum and don't even know what books, version or language the Mingun Sayadaw is meant to have remembered.

"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence” - Carl Sagan
You seem to have completely misunderstood what I have written.
I kindly ask you to check what I have written, not what you think I may have written
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Old 16th September 2020, 12:29 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
Are you looking to ascribe some mystical cause or divine assist? Or has this one just grabbed your fancy?
See my comment to Mr. Ellard above

Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
Impressive? Hells yeah. Lots of things I can't do are. Actually, that's a pretty low bar.
Interesting? Ehh... 3/10.
Well, if the conversation is not interesting for you, why even bother joining..
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Old 16th September 2020, 01:47 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
This may be even easier to remember
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNYcviXK4rg
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Old 16th September 2020, 01:52 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
See my comment to Mr. Ellard above







Well, if the conversation is not interesting for you, why even bother joining..
Waiting for you to point us to all you've read about this which paints MinGun in such a fantastical light.
You've actually said much, shown little and proven nothing. Every actual detail we've gleaned has come from someone else.
Show us what convinced you he was "superhuman".
I actually like the eidetic/autobio memory topic. It's as much scary curse as useful blessing IMO. But this ain't that.

.

BTW... welcome to the board, but this is what happens here. And a lot of it is tearing apart claims to find the truth inside. It's not personal, we really do want to see what's what.
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Old 16th September 2020, 03:42 AM   #62
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Quote:
....we really do want to see what's what.
Don't we all?
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Old 16th September 2020, 03:42 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
You've actually said much, shown little and proven nothing.
English.
This fabulous yet still not well understood language.

Originally Posted by EHocking View Post
I see your Pink Project and raise you, King Gizzard and the Lizzard Wizzard
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I can do better.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub747pprmJ8

Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
BTW... welcome to the board, but this is what happens here. And a lot of it is tearing apart claims to find the truth inside. It's not personal, we really do want to see what's what.
Nay!
You come here just to prove yourself right.
Sorry I was just not trying to prove my point right but ask for info.
I dont have a point BTW.

Last edited by MMarco; 16th September 2020 at 03:44 AM.
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:58 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
A usual song of the 80s or of the 90s may have lyrics 200-300 words long
So it would take about 2 million/200 roughly equal to 10000 songs to make the same amount of content
Roughly.
If you do know the lyrics of 10000 songs by heart and be able to recite it at random without mistakes I strongly advice you to go to some TV show and to show off your abilities.
You would make tons of $$ I believe.
I am barely able to remember the lyrics of one single song and it took me ages to remember
I've never bothered to count, it's just that I do know most of the words to songs played on "classic rock" stations now. Also, this doesn't count knowing the musical composition as well. How many words is a note worth?
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:04 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by MMarco View Post
Yes, so now you seem to agree with me that people would not usually consider this feat (if true) as possible while above you stated that it is only me who would consider this as not possible so I see a contradiction here.
Easily resolved:

If there were good evidence that it did happen, I guess you would have to re-evaluate the limits of what you consider as possible.

Anyway, do you believe it really happened as claimed?
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:18 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by Pixel42 View Post
If true it's impressive, but I too don't consider it worthy of the degree of astonishment you appear to be experiencing. I also tend to agree with alfanier that anyone who actually achieved it ought to find something better to do with their time and skills. Any utility such an ability might once have had disappeared when writing was invented.
If this is the only skill the guy has it may not transfer well into other fields. It may be this or nothing. Sometimes you just have to settle for what you have.
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:31 AM   #67
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I haven't thoroughly read the thread, but has the gentleman in question claimed any supernatural powers himself?
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Old 16th September 2020, 09:50 AM   #68
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Well, this monk was a mortal man, right? He was born, breathed, ate, drank, evacuated, and died, correct? If he really memorized a 2 million word 'Oly Booke, then it was a human, not superhuman, feat.

See, MMarco, it's your suggestive introduction of "superhuman" that gripes people here. We've heard way too many attempts to run a woo-hoo train into this station. It all grows stale, and predictable.

Advocates of the super-dupernatural are even known to haver, backpeddle, and act injured when they're questioned. Can you believe it?
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Old 16th September 2020, 10:11 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
I haven't thoroughly read the thread, but has the gentleman in question claimed any supernatural powers himself?
I think it's irrelevant to the actual thesis hiding behind the stalking horse: If this actually happened, most people would agree that magic is real.
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Old 16th September 2020, 10:16 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
The Iliad (or song of Illium) is Homer's orally recited poem of the Trojan Wars memorised by many bards from ancient Greece . It has 148,045 words. The same bards had to remember the Odyssey, which is approximately the same size.

You need to learn basic research skills before making further claims.
Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
This may be even easier to remember.......something you forgot to mention that I already identified, as Homer used the same technique in the Iliad.

Many suttas ( in the Tipitaka) contain repetitive passages. Read the sutta as you would a piece of music: when you sing or listen to a song, you don't skip over each chorus; likewise, when you read a sutta, you shouldn't skip over the refrains. As in music, the refrains in the suttas often contain unexpected — and important — variations that you don't want to miss.
Originally Posted by Matthew Ellard View Post
Well I thought I'd apply some other skeptic checks out of interest.

"The Tripitaka was handed down orally, then written down in the third century B.C.E. According to Buddhist tradition"

Well that's a lot to remember, however I know from Homer's Iliad, that was also handed down orally, that some of these documents are composed as poems to allow for memorising. That may be the case here but I can't speak the original language.

"Tripitaka means "three baskets," from the way in which it was originally recorded: the text was written on long, narrow leaves, which were sewn at the edges then grouped into bunches and stored in baskets."

Well that would be a lot of leaves for two million words.

I'm now openly wondering if the monk was reciting a shorter original language version of the Tripitaka and not the published modern English version.
The Iliad was not memorized, though. It was composed and transmitted orally. That involved memorization, but the poem wasn't memorized word for word. As you say, oral poets use repetitions and formulas that fit the poetic meter ("rosy-fingered dawn," "Son of Laertes and the gods of old / Odysseus, great warrior and mariner"). The formulas aid in memorization, but also give the poets breathing room to situate themselves and decide where they're going to go from there.

Milman Parry and Alfred Lord studied Serbian and Croatian oral poets, as described in Lord's book The Singer of Tales. The poets would say they recited the same poem the exact same way every time, word for word, but Parry and Lord found that the poem was actually different every time, sometimes very significantly different. The poets read the room. If people were interested in a particular part, the poet would draw that bit out. If attention was flagging, the poet would condense material. This is not to say that the poets were lying or even wrong. They just had a very different understanding of certain concepts.

So oral poetry is not fixed. It's not memorized word for word by rote. It varies in composition and transmission. Generally, it only becomes fixed when it is written down (and even then, there are often textual variants). However, it appears that the Tripitaka was orally composed and contains oral formulas and repetitions, and these, as you say, would aid memorization.
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Old 16th September 2020, 10:31 AM   #71
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In which case it's highly unlikely that he would have been verified by Guinness against a written version of the material. Either that part of the story is fiction, or Guinness's verification is worthless (since it's implausible that the guy would have happened to memorize exactly that written version).

Actually the true supernatural claim is that anyone bothered to sit down and verify a million-word oral recitation against a written text, word for word.

This renders the whole "if it really happened people would have to admit that magic might be real" line of discussion fairly moot. There's no evidence that verification actually happened, and good reason to think it probably didn't.

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Old 16th September 2020, 11:19 AM   #72
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As far as memorizing the Tipitaka, here's some Buddhist lore that comes to mind, about (one aspect of) how the Tipitaka came to be:

So there was this cousin of the Buddha's, who was also his chief disciple, who was present in most/all of the Buddha's discourses. And he, the cousin, had a freaky memory, so that, after the Buddha passed, he -- Sanjaya was his name, I think, but I could be mistaken, and am too lazy to look it up -- was found able to recall every word of those discourses. And it was from his recollections that the Tipitaka was actually written down. (First Council, I think.)

So anyway, the point of this anecdote:

1. Our Burmese (Myanmarese? That a word?) friend was necessarily not the first to have done this. If he indeed has done it. (On the other hand, the Tipitaka contains way more than just the discourses, so there's that.)

2. I can think of a reason why the monk wasted so much time with this crazy stunt. Just my speculation, but seems plausible. Given that this freak feat of verbatim recall is what enabled the Buddha's discourses to be written down at all, and given that it was his chief disciple who did this, that's two reasons why doing this might be considered something that "earns you merit", if you happen to be a Buddhist monk.

This does seem to be a crazy way to spend your time, but I guess life isn't very exciting for monks, plus if it gets you admiration and veneration from your fellow monks, well, why not?

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Old 16th September 2020, 11:25 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by Jim_MDP View Post
Rolond... did that file say how long he took? (may have to ask this again if he doesn't see it here)
It doesn't give any specific time scales for his learning but it does say:

"The Ven. Mingun Sayadaw also trained for the physically gruelling examination. Where an oral session would last for three hours he would practice reciting for five, thus accustoming himself to a test of ten hours a day. And he would do this for longer than the stretch of 33 days of the examination. He trained Likewise for the written examination."

His examination results incase you're interested:

"In the written examination in the Pali text, Commentaries, and Sub-commentaries on the Vinaya, the Ven. Mingun Sayadaw received the following marks out of a possible 100.

Parajika 98
Pacittiya 99
Mahavagga 92
~avagga 98
Parivara 100

In the Fourth and Fifth Examinations, the Yen. Mingun Sayadaw appeared for the oral and written examinations on the Abhidhamma and passed with equal facility."

So his recall wasn't flawless. Impressive nonetheless.

I get the impression from the PDF he was training to recite this for years.
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Old 16th September 2020, 11:29 AM   #74
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Originally Posted by Chanakya View Post
Our Burmese (Myanmarese? That a word?)
According to Wikipedia, the demonyms are Myanma and Myanmar, but the citations are dubious at best.
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Old 16th September 2020, 11:38 AM   #75
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I'm glad to see that it took 33 days, because at 130 words per minute, 2 million words would be 256 hours of speaking time - more than 10 days straight.
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Old 16th September 2020, 11:44 AM   #76
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
According to Wikipedia, the demonyms are Myanma and Myanmar, but the citations are dubious at best.

Myanmarese does follow, from Myanmar. (Quick Google check.)

Myanma and Myanmese -- and "demonym" as well! -- are new terms learnt, so thanks!
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Old 16th September 2020, 11:52 AM   #77
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Originally Posted by Chanakya View Post
Myanmarese does follow, from Myanmar. (Quick Google check.)

Myanma and Myanmese -- and "demonym" as well! -- are new terms learnt, so thanks!
Demonym is one of my favorite "obscure" words, because it opens up a whole world of obscure words.
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Old 16th September 2020, 01:01 PM   #78
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Kim Peek, who was autistic (reportedly the inspiration for the movie Rain Man), was reportedly able to recite the entire Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare from memory.
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Old 16th September 2020, 01:20 PM   #79
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I pity the fool who had to sit next to Kim Peek with an open Bible and verify their recitation, word for word.

The more I think about it, the less plausible it seems that any of these claims were ever actually verified.
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Old 16th September 2020, 02:00 PM   #80
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Originally Posted by theprestige View Post
I pity the fool who had to sit next to Kim Peek with an open Bible and verify their recitation, word for word.

The more I think about it, the less plausible it seems that any of these claims were ever actually verified.
I get what you're saying but I don't have a problem with believing the guy in the OP can do pretty much what has been stated. It's nothing supernatural of course, he just spent most of his life training himself to do it. Not my cup of tea but hey, what ever floats your boat.
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