ISF Logo   IS Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology
 


Welcome to the International Skeptics Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.
Tags static electricity

Reply
Old 8th February 2007, 06:25 PM   #1
Grafight
New Blood
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 12
Please help! I'm static-man

I'm pretty sure this is not a paranormal phenomenon, but it sure hurts. I collect charge like a mother and I get zapped all the time.

Every time after a ride in the car I get out and get zapped by the door. I get zapped by every door knob, water fountain, light switch...

I no longer can vacuum. Touching the vacuum cleaner after a few seconds of it being on is like grabbing a high-voltage wire. Everyone else in the house can vacuum without a problem, however.

I make a light show by taking off a sweater in the dark. I had to quit a job making road signs, where we applied reflective sheeting signs onto metal blanks. I woudl grab a sheet of metal, and if it touched another (which it had to, since they were stored in piles) there'd be a huge spark, and it was quite painful. We had a cement floor and my wearing boots with rubber soles and gloves didn't help. But everyone else was OK.

So what's wrong with me?? and why does it seem to get worse?? I fear that some day I will find myself within 10 feet of a VanDe Graaff generator and spontaneously combust. If spontaneous combustion is a paranormal phenomenon... Can I claim the JREF prize posthumously?
Grafight is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 07:55 PM   #2
rockoon
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,106
Its the cold weather.
__________________
Quality never goes begging.
rockoon is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 09:33 PM   #3
ClintonHammond
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 867
It's not the cold... it's the wind and the dry....
ClintonHammond is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 09:40 PM   #4
Grafight
New Blood
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 12
thank you

Thanks for the repies guys. I have experienced this problem all-year-round, and far more noticeably than other people around me, who share the same humidity/wind conditions.
Grafight is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 09:48 PM   #5
Solus
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,722
How do you fix such a problem?

Might I suggest grounding yourself? For example before I work on a computer I touch a piece of metal to get rid of static electricity buildup. Walk around with a metal bracelet or something, maybe that would help? Steel toed shoes too. The shoes might be a good idea.

I'm not educated enough on this subject to be of much help though.
Solus is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 09:54 PM   #6
Slimething
Illuminator
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,790
Lots of good advice here. I'm usually all charged up, too, especially in dry weather. (I live in AZ and it's dry here but not cold.) I've taken to occassionally touching anything, even walls, to disippate some of the lectric before letting it build to painful proportions. It's metal banisters I dread most.
Slimething is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th February 2007, 10:07 PM   #7
hcmom
Tagger
 
hcmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 10,391
I can help with the car problem! As you get out of the car, make sure you are already touching the metal frame of the car. I grab hold of the top of the door. Keep holding it until you are completely out of the car. For door knobs and such, use your keys for the initial contact. (I know, it sounds counter-productive...) You still kind of feel the shock, but the zap isn't in it.

My biggest problem since I found the solution to those two is canned items at the grocery store, since walking around touching everything with my keys attracts attention....
__________________
JeffWagg> hcmom, you can feel that way if you want, but you're quite innocent.
Curnir> Hcmom. taking reality into a wholly new direction

hcmom is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 02:35 AM   #8
Mosquito
Critical Thinker
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 326
Once upon a time (back in school) I had long hair and there was one floor of one building in which I seemed to charge up like nobody's business. Only that floor, but I spent some time there, so it was a problem. Others (even with long hair) didn't seem to have that problem. I think I even killed a computer once, zapping it with my Electric Power Of Doom.

My solution? Kick some metal every now and then. The spark goes from the foot/shoe and is much less problematic.

This really was just a symptom-dealing solution. The real problem I suspect was that my hair rubbing against dry air and whatever t-shirt I was wearing charged me up.

I think you could try a different conditioner (I didn't use one, but when I started, the problem went away/got much smaller).

Mosquito (now have short hair, so no problem)
__________________
Some .sigs are long and boring, this isn't long.
Mosquito is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 03:01 AM   #9
SimonD
Rouge Element
 
SimonD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,092
Fair skin?
Very dry skin (celtic/anglo-saxon decent)

.... plus the dry weather

Happens to me all the time

On fridges handles, cars, steel railings, anything metal.

It has gotten to the point where I test ever metal surface I touch, by quicky touching the surface and then jerking my hand away. All an effert to minimize the shock - you should see the looks I get at work

Being in IT it really is bad. I have even killed a couple of boards.
SimonD is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 08:52 AM   #10
Patsy
Prickly Desert Denizen
 
Patsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 580
You might try noticing how you walk as well. I have joint problems in my feet that make me tend to scuff or drag my feet a bit instead of picking them up and putting them down with each step. It seems to have the same effect on me as rubbing a balloon on your hair has on the balloon. I gather tons of static, am zapped by everything I touch, and zap every person I touch.

Living in dry as a bone Tucson doesn't help .
__________________
"Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science."
-- Charles Darwin; Introduction: The Descent of Man

Patsy is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 08:58 AM   #11
Hawk one
Emperor of the Internet
 
Hawk one's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Right below The Hat.
Posts: 13,685
My main static problem is when I'm in the supermarket, and have to open one of those doors with glass frames and a metal handle to get to the milk and other dairy products.

The only "trick" I have here isn't a solution as such, but I found that my knuckles are less sensitive to these shocks than my fingertips are, so even when I could hear the discharge, I hardly felt it. Quite an improvement, really.

Of course, my situation isn't half as serious as yours, but if you can't actually fix the problem, then at least try to find a less sensitive spot for the discharge, if possible.
__________________
Boynott everything!

If only health care was like video games. Then the ones who could pay for it would get it, and the ones who couldn't would die, like nature intended for people without money. A perfect system, right? RIGHT?
Hawk one is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 09:58 AM   #12
ClintonHammond
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 867
Is Fair Skin really a factor?!?!
ClintonHammond is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 09:59 AM   #13
hcmom
Tagger
 
hcmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 10,391
No.
__________________
JeffWagg> hcmom, you can feel that way if you want, but you're quite innocent.
Curnir> Hcmom. taking reality into a wholly new direction

hcmom is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 11:26 AM   #14
Orangutan
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,174
I most often build up a charge because I am wearing dis-similar materials. A sweater over a polyester shirt, or under a jacket with a polyester lining is ideal. As you move around you will start to generate a charge. You are essentially a big bag of water and can hold quite a static charge. You will retain this charge until it can find somewhere to leak to, either slowly because of a damp atmosphere or quickly because you come in contact with another body that has a different charge such as another person or electrical earth.

So basically look at what you are wearing, Dump the wool sweater or go for cotton shirts. Check the lining of your jackets for polyester too. Wearing rubber boots will insulate you from the earth meaning the charge has nowhere to go, it sounds like you might be stuck with the boots though. Finally hold onto a piece of metal like your car keys and touch them to anything you might get a shock from. So long as you have good contact you wont get zapped as much. Most of the pain comes from when a spark is formed from your skin to something, the rest is just muscle twitch.

Good luck.
Orangutan is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 01:52 PM   #15
BillC
Bazooka Joe
 
BillC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,380
Try wearing a different pair of shoes. There was one pair I would never wear in the test lab because I would get static shocks all the time. More conducting soles will help.
__________________
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams
"If homeopathy works, then obviously the less you use it, the stronger it gets. So the best way to apply homeopathy is to not use it at all." - Phil Plait
BillC is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 01:54 PM   #16
Dragonrock
Militant Elvisian Tacoist
 
Dragonrock's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Kotzebue, Alaska. A.K.A. Santa's first stop on his way out.
Posts: 10,217
Originally Posted by simon dalton View Post
It has gotten to the point where I test ever metal surface I touch, by quicky touching the surface and then jerking my hand away. All an effert to minimize the shock - you should see the looks I get at work
Moving your hand quickly won't help, electricity moves at the speed of light, and I doubt you can move your hand that fast. The better idea is to ground yourself with something less sensitive like your elbow of the back of your hand.
__________________
...it rings a bell in my head that just don't chime...--pillory

There is no God but the Great Taco In The Sky and Elvis is his prophet.
Dragonrock is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 01:54 PM   #17
SimonD
Rouge Element
 
SimonD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,092
Originally Posted by ClintonHammond View Post
Is Fair Skin really a factor?!?!
Your right...fair skin does not matter. I guess I was trying to give a discription of myself being of celtic decent.

I should have stuck more with the (very) dry skin....my mistake
SimonD is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 03:15 PM   #18
Crazycowbob
Bovine Overlord
 
Crazycowbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,384
Oh yeah, I have this problem too, may cats absolutely HATE it lol! One thing is, all that insulation with socks and shoes isn't helping you any, as it's only preventing the charge on your body from dissapating. Static is normally built up by motion, so touching metal before you get out of the car and such like others have suggested is a really good idea.

Of course if it's just too big a problem, a nice extreme solution would be to stick a small peice of metal/foil on the bottom of your shoe and attach an antistatic wrist strap to it and your ankle LOL
__________________
"Pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space,
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth." Eric Idle, The Meaning of Life
Crazycowbob is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 03:57 PM   #19
jimbob
Uncritical "thinker"
 
jimbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 15,159
You can buy static dissipative shoes for use in labs, If it is *really* a problem mayby lash something up (actually that might look pretty wierd- goes with the tinfoil hat brigade...)*. It is best to have a large resistnce, so any static is constantly dissipated, but slowly...

*As the tinfoil hats aren't earthed, are they just GBFO arials that would make any mind-control radio signals stronger?


Jim
jimbob is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 06:33 PM   #20
Grafight
New Blood
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 12
Thanks

Thanks everyone for the replies. I've already tested some of the solutions suggested, and I do touch every metal surface with my knuckles or the back of my hand. Sometimes I get caught by surprise, like with light switches.

I will try the key-to-metal idea, hcmom, and see if that works. Simon, I have dark short hair and I was born in Spain, so my skin is darker than an Anglo-Saxon or Nordic/Celtic, but lighter than American Hispanics (Spanish + Native American). People say I resemble Antonio Banderas, so I have the same skin/hair color as he does.

I do have dry skin. Patsy, I'll make a conscious effort not to drag my feet and see if that helps. Orangutan, I will take notice of what I'm wearing, but the rest of my family dress similarly and they don't seem affected. Also I've noticed I get charged about the same regardless of clothing (even at the pool or the beach with nothing but a bathing suit on).

Crazycowbob. Believe it or not, I've thought about grounding myself like that. For what I know about electrostatics, the charge builds up on the surface of poor conductors, like skin gradually, with most people. With me it builds really fast and I don't know how the foil in the foot trick would work. I may actually try it. I've also heard that the amount of sodium in your body makes a difference, but I don't know for sure.

Thakns everyone for the suggestions. I'm gonna do some experimenting.
Grafight is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 06:40 PM   #21
Grafight
New Blood
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 12
Oh and I forgot

I forgot to mention... I was going to ask if there's any knowledge of Static Electricity having being used by scam artists to fool the gullible into thinking someone has special powers.

I know people have used tiny magnets actually positioned under their skin, or very controlled and hard to see blowing, to move book pages.
Grafight is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 07:46 PM   #22
chippy
Muse
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 521
It's not the cold, it's the lack of humidity. All you have to do is fill up some pots with water and boil them on your stove. It's cheaper than buying a humidifier! Basically you just need more humidity in your home. The cold freezes all the moisture in the air, leaving it very dry.

Trust me, I know, I live in a state where 10 degrees is warm this time of year. It's ridiculous. I reached over to turn off a lamp the other night and practically electrocuted myself.

Last edited by chippy; 9th February 2007 at 07:48 PM.
chippy is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 07:56 PM   #23
SimonD
Rouge Element
 
SimonD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,092
Originally Posted by chippy View Post
It's not the cold, it's the lack of humidity. All you have to do is fill up some pots with water and boil them on your stove. It's cheaper than buying a humidifier! Basically you just need more humidity in your home. The cold freezes all the moisture in the air, leaving it very dry.

Trust me, I know, I live in a state where 10 degrees is warm this time of year. It's ridiculous. I reached over to turn off a lamp the other night and practically electrocuted myself.
Sometimes I get a shock from the water coming out of the tape (not from the steel tap now, but from the water itself!). It's a cool to see the water move towards your hand.
SimonD is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th February 2007, 08:07 PM   #24
Skeptic Ginger
formerly skeptigirl
 
Skeptic Ginger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 62,506
In addition to the dry air, the surface you are on can be the problem. I put foam in the back of my little camper once and anytime you scooted across it you had to ground yourself or you'd get a shock. I just learned to touch the wheel-well when moving around in the camper. Socks on certain floors can do it. Experiment with different locations and foot wear and see if you can pin down the offending materials/surfaces.
Skeptic Ginger is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 12:42 AM   #25
ChrisC
Critical Thinker
 
ChrisC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 466
If all else fails, pound a metal rod deep into the ground and tether yourself to it with a few thousand metres of aircraft cable (more if travelling out of town).

I used to get some bad-ass shocks in Edmonton during the winter. I tried, unsucessfully, to capture the discharges on photographic film. It was fun to sneak up and shock the cat and girlfriend though.
ChrisC is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 08:46 AM   #26
kmortis
Biomechanoid
Director of IDIOCY (Region 13)
Deputy Admin
 
kmortis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Texas (aka Southern Tier)
Posts: 29,814
And if all else fails, build a Faraday Cage around yourself.

Actually, the dissimilar materials and humdity control are really your best bets. So, no more rubbing lamb's wool on amber for you.
__________________
-Aberhaten did it
- "Which gives us an answer to our question. What’s the worst thing that can happen in a pressure cooker?" Randall Munroe
-Director of Independent Determining Inquisitor Of Crazy Yapping
- Aberhaten's Apothegm™ - An Internet law that states that optimism is indistinguishable from sarcasm
kmortis is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 10:14 AM   #27
MortFurd
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,999
I have the same problem.

Wear cotton clothing, and leather soled shoes. Those two make the biggest difference.
MortFurd is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 10:52 AM   #28
rockoon
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,106
Originally Posted by chippy View Post
It's not the cold, it's the lack of humidity.
...
The cold freezes all the moisture in the air, leaving it very dry.
Complicate it however you guys want.

Its cold, so it happens.
__________________
Quality never goes begging.
rockoon is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 05:16 PM   #29
kevin
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,666
BTW, one trick I've learned is to touch any metal surface with the back of my wrist before using my fingers. Either the wider surface area or fewer nerve endings (perhaps both) make it much less painful than getting zapped through my fingers.
kevin is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 05:25 PM   #30
chippy
Muse
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 521
Originally Posted by rockoon View Post
Complicate it however you guys want.

Its cold, so it happens.
I'm just saying, if you know it's due to a lack of humidity, then you know how to fix the problem. Put more humidity in your home.
chippy is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 10th February 2007, 06:03 PM   #31
Verde
Muse
 
Verde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Where the jackalopes roam.
Posts: 817
Originally Posted by kevin View Post
BTW, one trick I've learned is to touch any metal surface with the back of my wrist before using my fingers. Either the wider surface area or fewer nerve endings (perhaps both) make it much less painful than getting zapped through my fingers.
Dunno about the nerve endings, but surface area does have a major effect. For a constant electrical charge, the voltage difference is inversely proportional to the capacitance. As the surface area increases, so does the capacitance and thus the voltage drops. Try building up a charge, and then touching a grounded surface with a) the tip of the pinkey finger, b) the tip of the thumb, c) the palm of the hand.
The difference in the 'zap' effect is very noticeable.
Verde is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 11th February 2007, 10:38 AM   #32
MortFurd
Graduate Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,999
Originally Posted by Dragonrock View Post
Moving your hand quickly won't help, electricity moves at the speed of light, and I doubt you can move your hand that fast. The better idea is to ground yourself with something less sensitive like your elbow of the back of your hand.
Current does not move at the speed of light. Current flow is the movement of electrons through a conductor. Since electrons have mass, they cannot move at the speed of light. Also, electrons don't just move through empty space. They interact with the atoms of the conductor, which slows them down greatly.

The "zap" is short because there's not a lot of electrons stored on your body, not because the discharge is especially fast.

Here's a nifty site that has some information on current flow.
MortFurd is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 11th February 2007, 02:06 PM   #33
kmortis
Biomechanoid
Director of IDIOCY (Region 13)
Deputy Admin
 
kmortis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Texas (aka Southern Tier)
Posts: 29,814
Originally Posted by MortFurd View Post
Current does not move at the speed of light. Current flow is the movement of electrons through a conductor. Since electrons have mass, they cannot move at the speed of light. Also, electrons don't just move through empty space. They interact with the atoms of the conductor, which slows them down greatly.

The "zap" is short because there's not a lot of electrons stored on your body, not because the discharge is especially fast.

Here's a nifty site that has some information on current flow.
True, they don't move at c, but they do move one HELL of a lot faster than your muscles can move your arm.
__________________
-Aberhaten did it
- "Which gives us an answer to our question. What’s the worst thing that can happen in a pressure cooker?" Randall Munroe
-Director of Independent Determining Inquisitor Of Crazy Yapping
- Aberhaten's Apothegm™ - An Internet law that states that optimism is indistinguishable from sarcasm
kmortis is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th March 2008, 03:13 PM   #34
seasame
New Blood
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3
i am glad i found this site- i too have a big problem with static electricity. But I also experience it in the summer (not as bad though) walking on a marble floor ,touched marble banister and got a "zap". One of my problems is that i am a teacher and can't always ground myself before touching someone! just zapped a student yesterday. Usually I am in tennis shoes on linoleum floor. Most of my clothing is cotton- hmm.

I am glad to know that i am not going crazy

I am open to suggestions
seasame is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th March 2008, 03:41 PM   #35
Nursefoxfire
Graduate Poster
 
Nursefoxfire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,273
Here's a solution we used in my husband's car (he had velor seats and during the winter months the static was a killer!). Keep a few new dryer sheets in the car. Every week or so, rub one all over the surface of the seat where your body would be touching it. That seemed to really cut down on static buildup in the car.

The dryer sheets also work well if rubbed over your hair. This prevents fly-away hair during the winter, and static is kept to a minimum. You can also rub a dryer sheet over the bristles of your brush and comb.

I'm not sure if using dryer sheets on your hands would work when in the supermarket and trying to open one of those glass and metal dairy cases, but you might want to try that as well.
Nursefoxfire is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th March 2008, 06:30 PM   #36
casebro
Penultimate Amazing
 
casebro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 14,155
How about a copper rivet in your shoe sole, to make your own anti-static shoes? Or maybe an aluminum pop rivet. Ground yourself every step, before the charge builds.

Feet sweat is variable. Maybe some of you folks have drier feet, and don't make good contact with the earth? I'm a big guy at 1/7 of a ton, 15% body fat, and seldom get static- from anything. Or anybody. But big folks sweat more. Inverse square of the surface/cooling area. Scale something up to twice the mass, get only 70% more cooling surface area. So a 30% shortage in 'radiator'. Maybe all of you folks with electrifying personalities are slender?
__________________
Great minds discuss ideas.
Medium minds discuss events.
Small minds spend all their time on U-Tube and Facebook.

Last edited by casebro; 7th March 2008 at 06:31 PM.
casebro is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th March 2008, 08:08 PM   #37
Olowkow
Philosopher
 
Olowkow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 8,230
You can buy rubberized conductive straps for the car. They attach to the frame and drag on the ground. According to Click and Clack, these work.
Cotton clothing does not generate static, in my experience. But the floor surface and shoes are the big problem. Usually, carpets are bad but I saw a lab once that for some reason, with a tile floor, the static was deadly. I finally told them to use a long lead grounded wrist band, like they use for computer repairs. There was no other solution, except to go barefoot.

Humidifying the air works too.

Or,.....turn it into a feature...use it to charge your ipod!

Last edited by Olowkow; 7th March 2008 at 08:10 PM.
Olowkow is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 7th March 2008, 08:15 PM   #38
Gravy
Downsitting Citizen
 
Gravy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 17,072
Originally Posted by seasame View Post
I am open to suggestions
When you send me money, I will turn off the shocking device. Clear enough?
__________________
"Please, keep your chops cool and don’t overblow.” –Freddie Hubbard

What's the Harm?........Stop Sylvia Browne........My 9/11 links
Gravy is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th March 2008, 04:29 AM   #39
jimbob
Uncritical "thinker"
 
jimbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 15,159
Originally Posted by seasame View Post
i am glad i found this site- i too have a big problem with static electricity. But I also experience it in the summer (not as bad though) walking on a marble floor ,touched marble banister and got a "zap". One of my problems is that i am a teacher and can't always ground myself before touching someone! just zapped a student yesterday. Usually I am in tennis shoes on linoleum floor. Most of my clothing is cotton- hmm.

I am glad to know that i am not going crazy

I am open to suggestions
HEre is ta solution:

Originally Posted by chippy View Post
I'm just saying, if you know it's due to a lack of humidity, then you know how to fix the problem. Put more humidity in your home.
Also don't wear polyester
__________________
OECD healthcare spending
Expenditure on healthcare
http://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems/health-data.htm
link is 2015 data (2013 Data below):
UK 8.5% of GDP of which 83.3% is public expenditure - 7.1% of GDP is public spending
US 16.4% of GDP of which 48.2% is public expenditure - 7.9% of GDP is public spending
jimbob is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th March 2008, 04:45 AM   #40
baron
Illuminator
 
baron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,832
I have the same problem, mostly at work for some reason (I blame the cheap carpet).

On that point, the other week I was walking through the library at work. A staff member was showing round a group of be-suited visitors, speaking in a low voice, so I quietly edged round them being careful not to interrupt.

When I went to open the door, however, I forgot to touch the wooden surround first and got a massive jolt from the metal handle. I actually saw the spark and heard the crack.

"JESUS!" I shouted, and I could just feel everyone behind me turn to look. The staff member momentarily fell silent.

I didn't feel like explaining what had happened so I sort of winced and hurriedly left without looking back.
__________________
I'm sorry, the fish is awful.
baron is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

International Skeptics Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:06 AM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2014, TribeTech AB. All Rights Reserved.
This forum began as part of the James Randi Education Foundation (JREF). However, the forum now exists as
an independent entity with no affiliation with or endorsement by the JREF, including the section in reference to "JREF" topics.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.